Found 43 article(s) for author 'Wages'

Does Productivity Still Determine Worker Compensation? Domestic and International Evidence

Does Productivity Still Determine Worker Compensation? Domestic and International Evidence. Robert Lawrence, 2016, Book Chapter. “The American dream is that each generation should live twice as well as the previous one, and this requires that incomes rise at an annual rate of around 2 percent per year. At this pace, incomes will double every 35 years. Between 1947 and 1970, average real compensation in the US increased at annual rate of 2.6 percent—a pace that was actually faster than required to achieve the dream. But since 1970, the average real compensation of US workers has grown at less than 1 percent per year, and at that pace it would take almost a lifetime to see incomes double.Link

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On Equal Pay Day, Why The Gender Gap Still Exists

On Equal Pay Day, Why The Gender Gap Still Exists. Claudia Goldin, April 12, 2016, Audio. “President Obama has declared today Equal Pay Day. There’s a reason it falls on April 12. As the proclamation says, today marks how far into the new year women would have to work in order to earn the same as men did in the previous year. Women, on average, make 79 cents for every dollar men earn. Harvard economics professor Claudia Goldin has looked into the reasons for this, and you say the reason is not primarily discrimination. Is that right?Link

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Tax Aversion in Labor Supply

Tax Aversion in Labor Supply. Michael I. Norton, April 2016, Paper. “In a real-effort laboratory experiment, labor supply decreases more with the introduction of a tax than with a financially equivalent drop in wages. This “tax aversion” is large in magnitude: when we decompose the productivity decrease that arises from taxation, we estimate that 40% is due to the lower net wage and the remaining 60% to tax aversion. This tax aversion affects labor supply more on the extensive margin (working less) than on the intensive margin (being less productive while working). The aversion is equally strong whether tax revenue goes to the U.S. government or back to the experimenter (a “laboratory tax”). We discuss the implications of our results for the relationship between labor supply and taxation.Link

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The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants

The Labor Supply of Undocumented Immigrants. George Borjas, March 2016, Paper. “The Department of Homeland Security estimates that 11.4 million undocumented persons reside in the United States. Congress and President Obama are considering a number of proposals to regularize the status of the undocumented population and provide a “path to citizenship.” Any future change in the immigration status of this group is bound to have significant effects on the labor market, on the number of persons that qualify for various government-provided benefits, on the timing of retirement, on the size of the population receiving Social Security benefits, and on the funding of almost all of these government programs. This paper provides a comprehensive empirical study of the labor supply behavior of undocumented immigrants in the United States.Link

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How to use Economic Theory to Improve Estimators, with an Application to Labor Demand and Wage Inequality

How to use Economic Theory to Improve Estimators, with an Application to Labor Demand and Wage Inequality. Maximilian Kasy, March 12, 2016, Paper. “Economic theory, when it has empirical content, provides testable restrictions on empirically identified objects. These empirical objects might be estimated in an unrestricted way, leading to estimates of potentially large variance, or subject to the theoretical restrictions, leading to estimates of lower variance that are potentially biased, inconsistent, and non-robust.Link

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Real Fixes for Workplace Bias

Real Fixes for Workplace Bias. Iris Bohnet, March 11, 2016, Opinion. “Corporations, not-for-profit groups and governments spend billions of dollars every year on diversity training—without knowing whether the programs work. A review of almost 1,000 studies on interventions aimed at reducing prejudice found that most programs weren’t tested.Link

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Tethered Lives: A Couple-Based Perspective on the Consequences of Parenthood for Time Use, Occupation, and Wages

Tethered Lives: A Couple-Based Perspective on the Consequences of Parenthood for Time Use, Occupation, and Wages. Alexandra Killewald, March 2016, Paper. “Prior research on parenthood effects has typically used single-sex models and estimated average effects. By contrast, we estimate population-level variability in partners’ changes in housework hours, paid work hours, occupation traits, and wages after becoming parents, and we explore whether one partner’s adjustment offsets or supplements the other’s. We find tradeoffs between spouses on paid work adjustments to parenthood, but complementarity in adjustments to housework hours, occupation traits, and wages. The effect of parenthood on wives’ behaviors is larger and more variable than husbands’ in every domain.Link

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The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: Additional Results

The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: Additional Results. George Borjas, December 2015, Paper. “Card’s (1990) study of the Mariel supply shock is an important contribution to the literature that measures the labor market impact of immigration. My recent reappraisal (Borjas, 2015) revealed that even the most cursory reexamination implied that the wage of low-skill workers in Miami declined substantially in the years after Mariel. In the three  months since the public release of my paper, there has already been one “re-reappraisal” of  the evidence.Link

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Why Do Firms Have “Purpose”? The Firm’s Role as a Carrier of Identity and Reputation

Why Do Firms Have “Purpose”? The Firm’s Role as a Carrier of Identity and Reputation. Rebecca Henderson, Eric Van den Steen, May 2015 , Paper. “This article develops a theory in which a firm’s adoption of a prosocial purpose can increase profitability by strengthening employees’ reputation and identity–leading to higher effort and lower wages–as long as implementing purpose is costly with respect to direct monetary payoffs. Employees who value prosocial action will select into firms with a social purpose, which then become a visible carrier for these employees’ identity and reputation.” Link

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Demand Side Secular Stagnation

Demand Side Secular Stagnation. Lawrence Summers, May 2015, Paper. “The experience of first Japan and now Europe and the USA suggests that Hansen’s concept of secular stagnation is highly relevant. Recovery has been anemic and follows a generation of financially unsustainable and often lackluster growth. Investment demand has declined while the supply of saving has increased, leaving the economy vulnerable to liquidity traps. Although some US indicators have improved, forward real rates have declined sharply, European prospects remain muddled, and the zero-bound will likely constrain again during the next recession...” Link

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