Found 24 article(s) for author 'Taxes'

Taxes and the macro economy

Taxes and the macro economy. Robert Barro, December 17, 2019, Paper, “My research with Furman (2018) assessed the 2017 U.S. tax reform and concluded that economic growth would be boosted by about 1 percent per year for 2018-19 and to a lesser extent for the following eight years. This forecast accorded well with realizations through the first quarter of 2019, but subsequent growth is slower, likely due to adverse effects from the ongoing trade war. Extensions from the previous research consider effects from businesses’ choices of legal form between corporate and pass-through status. Corporate form conveys benefits from perpetual legal identity, limited liability, potential for public trading of shares, and ability to retain earnings. However, legal changes have enhanced pass-through alternatives, for example, through the invention of the S-corporation in 1958 and the improved legal status of LLCs (limited liability companies) at the end of the 1980s. Corporate form is subject to a time varying tax wedge, which offsets the productivity benefits. In a theoretical framework, with a distribution of firms’ productivities associated with corporate and pass-through status, the tax wedge determines the fraction of firms that opt for corporate status, the level of economywide output (productivity), and the share of output generated by corporations. This framework underlies the empirical analysis of corporate shares of business economic activity. Long-difference regressions for 1968-2013 show that a higher tax wedge reduces the corporate share of gross assets. The corporate share also exhibits downward trends, likely reflecting underlying legal changes.” Link

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A GILTI High-Tax Exclusion Election Would Erode the U.S. Tax Base

A GILTI High-Tax Exclusion Election Would Erode the U.S. Tax Base. Stephen Shay, November 18, 2019, Paper, “This article responds to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking under Sections 958 and 951A published in the Federal Register on June 21, 2019 (the “Proposed Regulations”).1 The proposed expansion of the high tax election should not be adopted for the reasons set out in this article, including most importantly that the statute does not provide a basis for the interpretation proposed to be adopted.Link

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Warren’s plan to finance Medicare-for-all pushes into dangerous and uncharted territory

Warren’s plan to finance Medicare-for-all pushes into dangerous and uncharted territory. Lawrence Summers, November 5, 2019, Opinion, “Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren last week mounted a passionate defense of universal government-provided health care and made a detailed case that it can be paid for without burdening the middle class. The vision of Medicare-for-all is immensely attractive and evokes health systems in other countries that perform much better than ours does. I could easily imagine supporting a well-designed Medicare-for-all plan.Link

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My Best Growth Forecast Ever

My Best Growth Forecast Ever. Robert Barro, April 29, 2019, Opinion, “The Trump administration’s tax reform of 2017, which took effect in 2018, was viewed prospectively, and now retrospectively, as a contributor to US economic growth. But there was – and remains – a great deal of controversy over the size of the macroeconomic effects of the tax changes.Link

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Do Tax Cuts Produce more Einsteins? The Impacts of Financial Incentives Versus Exposure to Innovation on the Supply of Inventors

Do Tax Cuts Produce more Einsteins? The Impacts of Financial Incentives Versus Exposure to Innovation on the Supply of Inventors. Raj Chetty, April 12, 2019, Paper, “Many countries provide financial incentives to spur innovation, ranging from tax incentives to research and development grants. In this paper, we study how such financial incentives affect individuals’ decisions to pursue careers in innovation. We first present empirical evidence on inventors’ career trajectories and income distributions using deidentified data on 1.2 million inventors from patent records linked to tax records in the United States. We find that the private returns to innovation are extremely skewed—with the top 1% of inventors collecting more than 22% of total inventors’ income—and are highly correlated with their social impact, as measured by citations. Inventors tend to have their most impactful innovations around age 40 and their incomes rise rapidly just before they have high-impact patents. We then build a stylized model of inventor career choice that matches these facts as well as recent evidence that childhood exposure to innovation plays a critical role in determining whether individuals become inventors. The model predicts that financial incentives, such as top income tax reductions, have limited potential to increase aggregate innovation because they only affect individuals who are exposed to innovation and have essentially no impact on the decisions of star inventors, who matter most for aggregate innovation.Link

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A ‘wealth tax’ presents a revenue estimation puzzle

A ‘wealth tax’ presents a revenue estimation puzzle. Lawrence Summers, April 4, 2019, Opinion,“Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) recently proposed a 2 percent “wealth tax” on those worth more than $50 million. Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman, economists at the University of California at Berkeley, have played a major role in developing and validating this proposal. They estimate that the tax would raise $187 billion in 2019 (Warren’s additional 1 percent “billionaire surcharge” brings their total revenue estimate to $212 billion). This represents a substantial sum and has been widely quoted in both academic and policy discussions of wealth taxation.Link

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Do Tax Cuts Produce More Einsteins? The Impact of Financial Incentives vs. Exposure to Innovation on the Supply of Inventors

Do Tax Cuts Produce More Einsteins? The Impact of Financial Incentives vs. Exposure to Innovation on the Supply of Inventors. Raj Chetty, January 2019, Paper, “Many countries provide financial incentives to spur innovation, ranging from tax incentives to research and development grants. In this paper, we study how such financial incentives affect individuals’ decisions to pursue careers in innovation. We _first present empirical evidence on inventors’ career trajectories and income distributions using de-identified data on 1.2 million inventors from patent records linked to tax records in the U.S. We find that the private returns to innovation are extremely skewed – with the top 1% of inventors collecting more than 22% of total inventors’ income – and are highly correlated with their social impact, as measured by citations. Inventors tend to have their most impactful innovations around age 40 and their incomes rise rapidly just before they have high-impact patents. We then build a stylized model of inventor career choice that matches these facts as well as recent evidence that childhood exposure to innovation plays a critical role in determining whether individuals become inventors.Link

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The Trump Tax Cuts Boosted Growth and Jobs, but at What Cost?

The Trump Tax Cuts Boosted Growth and Jobs, but at What Cost? Jason Furman, December 18, 2018, Opinion, “It has been nearly a year since President Trump signed sweeping tax changes into law. The macroeconomic data already rule out some of the more extravagant claims about immediate jumps in wages and capital. But the more serious debate over the tax cuts’ long-run impact is still far from decided. Here’s what we do know..Link

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Three (almost) inexplicable parts of the Republican tax plan

Three (almost) inexplicable parts of the Republican tax plan. Lawrence Summers, November 5, 2017, Opinion, “With the release of the Republican tax proposal, the most important tax debate in a generation is in full swing. Most reasonable experts agree that tax reform has the potential to spur investment and raise wages while also simplifying the system and increasing its fairness and legitimacy. The right question for debate is not the desirability of tax reform or even of business tax reform directed at spurring investment. It is the likely economic effect of particular proposals.Link

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