Found 42 article(s) for author 'tax reform'

The Impact of Intranational Trade Barriers on Exports: Evidence from a Nationwide VAT Rebate Reform in China

The Impact of Intranational Trade Barriers on Exports: Evidence from a Nationwide VAT Rebate Reform in China. Jie Bai, December 2019, Paper, “It is well known that various forms of non-tariff trade barriers exist within a country. Empirically, it is difficult to measure these barriers as they can take many forms. We take advantage of a nationwide VAT rebate policy reform in China as a natural experiment to identify the existence of these intranational barriers due to local protectionism and study the impact on exports and exporting firms. As a result of shifting tax rebate burden, the reform leads to a greater incentive of the provincial governments to block the domestic flow of non-local goods to local export intermediaries. We develop an open-economy heterogenous firm model that incorporates multiple domestic regions and multiple exporting technologies, including the intermediary sector. Consistent with the model’s predictions, we find that rising local protectionism leads to a reduction in interprovincial trade, more “inward-looking” sourcing behavior of local intermediaries, and a reduction in manufacturing exports. Analysis using micro firm-level data further shows that private companies with greater baseline reliance on export intermediaries are more adversely affected.Link

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Shrinking the Tax Gap: Approaches and Revenue Potential

Shrinking the Tax Gap: Approaches and Revenue Potential. Lawrence Summers, November 2019, Paper, “Between 2020 and 2029, the IRS will fail to collect nearly $7.5 trillion of taxes it is due. It is not possible to calculate with precision how much of this “tax gap” could be collected. This paper offers a naïve approach. The analysis suggests that with feasible changes in policy, the IRS could aspire to shrink the tax gap by around 15 percent in the next decade—generating over $1 trillion in additional revenue by performing more audits (especially of high-income earners), increasing information reporting requirements, and investing in information technology. These investments will increase efficiency and are likely to be very progressive.Link

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A GILTI High-Tax Exclusion Election Would Erode the U.S. Tax Base

A GILTI High-Tax Exclusion Election Would Erode the U.S. Tax Base. Stephen Shay, November 18, 2019, Paper, “This article responds to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking under Sections 958 and 951A published in the Federal Register on June 21, 2019 (the “Proposed Regulations”).1 The proposed expansion of the high tax election should not be adopted for the reasons set out in this article, including most importantly that the statute does not provide a basis for the interpretation proposed to be adopted.Link

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Yes, our tax system needs reform. Let’s start with this first step

Yes, our tax system needs reform. Let’s start with this first step. Lawrence Summers, November 17, 2019, Opinion, “While there’s plenty of disagreement about how the money should be used, almost everyone involved in public-policy debates agrees that it would be good if the federal government could collect more revenue without raising tax rates or reducing tax deductions or credits.Link

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A ‘wealth tax’ presents a revenue estimation puzzle

A ‘wealth tax’ presents a revenue estimation puzzle. Lawrence Summers, April 4, 2019, Opinion,“Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) recently proposed a 2 percent “wealth tax” on those worth more than $50 million. Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman, economists at the University of California at Berkeley, have played a major role in developing and validating this proposal. They estimate that the tax would raise $187 billion in 2019 (Warren’s additional 1 percent “billionaire surcharge” brings their total revenue estimate to $212 billion). This represents a substantial sum and has been widely quoted in both academic and policy discussions of wealth taxation.Link

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Fair, comprehensive tax reform is the right path forward

Fair, comprehensive tax reform is the right path forward. Lawrence Summers, March 28, 2019, Opinion, “Over the last several weeks, we have paid careful attention to tax proposals by Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, for a 70 percent marginal tax rate on top earners, and by Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, for a wealth tax on those worth more than $50 million.Link

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A broader tax base that closes loopholes would raise more money than plans by Ocasio-Cortez and Warren

A broader tax base that closes loopholes would raise more money than plans by Ocasio-Cortez and Warren. Lawrence Summers, March 28, 2019, Opinion, “Tax reform debates have been transformed in recent weeks by a shift in emphasis from revenue raising and progressivity to an emphasis on going after the rich for the sake of equality and justice. Bold proposals from Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, for a 70 percent marginal tax rate on top earners, and from Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts — a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate — for a wealth tax on those worth more than $50 million have attracted widespread attention.Link

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Economy is fragile, recession could occur, Harvard professor warns

Economy is fragile, recession could occur, Harvard professor warns. Martin Feldstein, July 18, 2018, Video, “Renowned Harvard professor and economist Martin Feldstein said the Federal Reserve would not be prepared if a recession were to occur soon. Feldstein told FOX Business Opens a New Window. ’ Maria Bartiromo during an interview on “Mornings with Maria Opens a New Window. ” on Wednesday that the economy is in good shape because of low unemployment Opens a New Window. and inflation, but despite that, it is still very fragile.Link

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Is tax reform working? Not if you’re a worker in need of a raise

Is tax reform working? Not if you’re a worker in need of a raise. Jason Furman, July 10, 2018, Opinion, “We now have about six months of macroeconomic data since the passage of the 2017 tax cut, reform, scam, or whatever you want to call it — since the “Tax Cut and Jobs Act” name was removed in the amendment process.Link

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