Found 18 article(s) for author 'Tariffs'

USMCA Won’t Pave The Way For Best Trade Deal With China

USMCA Won’t Pave The Way For Best Trade Deal With China. Robert Lawrence, October 3, 2018, Audio, “Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment at Harvard Kennedy School, on the new Mexico-Canada trade deal, and how that impacts the outlook for China negotiations. Hosted by Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz.Link

 

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US Imposes New $200bn Tariffs on China

US Imposes New $200bn Tariffs on China. Mark Wu, September 17, 2018, Audio, “The US is imposing new tariffs on $200bn worth of Chinese goods as it escalates its trade war with Beijing. We hear from Mark Wu, professor of international trade law at Harvard Law School. So what is the view on this in China? We speak to our Asia Business Correspondent Karishma Vaswani from the World Economic Forum in Tianjin, China.Link

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Can the Trading System Survive US–China Trade Friction?

Can the Trading System Survive US–China Trade Friction? Robert Lawrence, September 13, 2018, Paper, “Donald Trump has sought to change US trading relationships by raising protection at home and taxing the offshore activities of US companies abroad. These measures, which both use and violate trade rules, have provoked retaliation from other countries. Such friction has restricted and distorted trade and investment, undermined the rules‐based trading system and perhaps permanently damaged global value chains that depend on stable rules for market access. Trump has justified some of his measures as a response to China’s alleged unfair practices and indeed, China has adopted industrial and technology policies that are formally neutral between domestic and foreign firms but in practice have led foreign firms to complain about discriminatory practices that favor Chinese firms.Link

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Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal

Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal. Robert Lawrence, August 15, 2018, Audio, “Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment at the Harvard Kennedy School and former economic advisor to Clinton, on the deal that Trump really wants with China. Hosted by Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz.Link

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The Use—and Abuse—of Tariffs

The Use—and Abuse—of Tariffs. Martin Feldstein, July 5, 2018, Opinion, “President Trump’s threatened barrage of tariffs on more than $400 billion of Chinese exports to the U.S. is set to begin Friday. While I am a strong advocate of free trade, the threat of tariffs can be useful in the right context. But the president has never specified his objective. What would the Chinese government have to do to stop Mr. Trump’s tariffs?Link

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US-China Trade Frictions and the Global Trading System

US-China Trade Frictions and the Global Trading System. Robert Lawrence, 2018, Book Chapter, “Recent trade frictions between the United States and China have violated several rules and practices of the rules-based multilateral trading system established under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and its successor, the World Trade Organization (WTO). President Donald Trump’s preoccupation with trade balances in goods, both bilateral and total, has led to protectionist trade policies at home— primarily to minimize imports and offshoring by US firms—and aggressive demands for more market opening abroad. President Trump appears to view trade not as an activity from which all nations can gain but rather as a zero-sum game in which some win and some lose.Link

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U.S. tariffs boost trade tensions and protectionist theory

U.S. tariffs boost trade tensions and protectionist theory. Jeffry Frieden, June 14, 2018, Audio, “In the potential tariff war between China and the United States, each state is choosing to protect different sectors. Which is right? And is there a way for a country to engage in “good” protectionism for its own interests? First off, economists in general agree that tariffs should be avoided because they bring costly trade-offs. If a country taxes imported sneakers, for instance, it helps domestic shoemakers but deprives shoe buyers of the best, low-price kicks.Link

 

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