Found 3 article(s) for author 'Social Norms'

Harvard Professor Cass Sunstein explains how social change happens

Harvard Professor Cass Sunstein explains how social change happens. Cass Sunstein, April 14, 2019, Audio, “Brian talks to Cass Sunstein, the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Sunstein served in the Obama administration as the Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs from 2009 to 2012. In his conversation with Brian, he discusses his new book, “How Change Happens,” which answers the question of how social change happens and how change is impacted by social norms.Link

Tags: , , , ,

License to Cheat: Voluntary Regulation and Ethical Behavior

License to Cheat: Voluntary Regulation and Ethical Behavior. Francesca Gino, September 2012, Paper. “While monitoring and regulation can be used to combat socially costly unethical conduct, their intended targets are often able to avoid regulation or hide their behavior. This surrenders at least part of the effectiveness of regulatory policies to firms’ and individuals’ decisions to voluntarily submit to regulation. We study individuals’ decisions to avoid monitoring or regulation and thus enhance their ability to engage in unethical conduct…” Link

Tags: , , , , ,

Is There Reciprocity In A Reciprocal-exchange Economy? Evidence Of Gendered Norms From A Slum In Nairobi, Kenya

Is There Reciprocity In A Reciprocal-exchange Economy? Evidence Of Gendered Norms From A Slum In Nairobi, Kenya. Iris Bohnet, 2008, Paper, “Norms of reciprocity help enforce cooperative agreements in bilateral sequential exchange. We examine the norms that apply in a reciprocal-exchange economy. In our one-shot investment game in a Nairobi slum, people adhered to the norm of “balanced reciprocity,” which obligates quid-pro-quo returns for any level of trust. The norm is gendered, with people more likely to comply when confronted with women rather than men, and differs from “conditional reciprocity,” prevalent in developed countries, according to which greater trust is rewarded with proportionally larger returns. Balanced reciprocity produces less trust and trustworthiness and smaller gains from trade than conditional reciprocity.Link

Tags: , , , ,