Found 23 article(s) for author 'Robert Lawrence'

Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal

Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal. Robert Lawrence, August 15, 2018, Audio, “Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment at the Harvard Kennedy School and former economic advisor to Clinton, on the deal that Trump really wants with China. Hosted by Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz.Link

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U.S. Should Use Allies, WTO, To Combat China On Trade

U.S. Should Use Allies, WTO, To Combat China On Trade. Robert Lawrence, July 9, 2018, Audio, “GUEST: Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment at Harvard Kennedy School and former economic advisor to President Bill Clinton, on the global supply chain and whether trade globalization can be undone at this point.Link

 

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US-China Trade Frictions and the Global Trading System

US-China Trade Frictions and the Global Trading System. Robert Lawrence, 2018, Book Chapter, “Recent trade frictions between the United States and China have violated several rules and practices of the rules-based multilateral trading system established under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and its successor, the World Trade Organization (WTO). President Donald Trump’s preoccupation with trade balances in goods, both bilateral and total, has led to protectionist trade policies at home— primarily to minimize imports and offshoring by US firms—and aggressive demands for more market opening abroad. President Trump appears to view trade not as an activity from which all nations can gain but rather as a zero-sum game in which some win and some lose.Link

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Five Reasons Why the Focus on Trade Deficits Is Misleading

Five Reasons Why the Focus on Trade Deficits Is Misleading. Robert Lawrence, March 2018, Opinion, “President Trump has asserted that trade balances are a key measure of a nation’s commercial success and that large US trade deficits prove that past trade approaches have been flawed. But trade deficits are not in fact a good measure of how well a country is doing with respect to its trade policies. Many of the assumptions on which the administration’s beliefs rest are not supported by the evidence. This Policy Brief argues that trade deficits are not necessarily bad, do not necessarily cost jobs or reduce growth, and are not a measure of whether foreign trade policies or agreements with other countries are fair or unfair. Efforts to use trade policy and agreements to reduce either bilateral or overall trade deficits are also unlikely to produce the effects the administration claims they will and instead lead to friction with US trading partners, harming the people the policies claim to help.Link

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Trade deficits caused by foreign borrowings; Harvard economist at Sri Lanka forum

Trade deficits caused by foreign borrowings; Harvard economist at Sri Lanka forum. Robert Lawrence, February 9, 2018, Video, “Trade and current account deficits are a result of foreign borrowings, a US economist told a forum in Sri Lanka as US President Donald Trump mistakenly attacked trade deficit based on false Mercantilist doctrine. Exporting more will not reduce a trade deficit, Robert Lawrence, a professor at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Business told an economic forum organized by Advocata Institute, a Colombo-based think tank.Link

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Recent US Manufacturing Employment: The Exception that Proves the Rule

Recent US Manufacturing Employment: The Exception that Proves the Rule. Robert Lawrence, November 2017, Paper, “This Working Paper challenges two widely held views: first that trade performance has been the primary reason for the declining share of manufacturing employment in the United States, and second that recent productivity growth in manufacturing has actually been quite rapid but is not accurately measured. The paper shows that for many decades, faster productivity growth interacting with unresponsive demand has been the dominant force behind the declining share of employment in manufacturing in the United States and other industrial economies. It also shows that since 2010, however, the relationship has been reversed and slower productivity growth in manufacturing has been associated with more robust performance in manufacturing employment.” Link

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Manufacturing and Inclusive Growth: The Experience in the Rest of the World

Manufacturing and Inclusive Growth: The Experience in the Rest of the World. Robert Lawrence, 2017, Paper, “This report describes some of the results from the second phase of the research project on the role of manufacturing in inclusive growth. The first phase of the project examined the US experience. In the second phase, undertaken by Robert Lawrence and Danial Lashkari – a graduate student in the Harvard Department of Economics, the scope of the analysis has broadened to explore the experience of manufacturing employment growth in the rest of the world.Link

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Making US Trade and Investment Policies Work for Global Development

Making US Trade and Investment Policies Work for Global Development. Robert Lawrence, , Paper, “In an interconnected world, sustainable and inclusive economic growth in less developed countries helps to secure US interests and values. Economic development nurtures peaceful societies, reduces refugee flows, ameliorates humanitarian crises, expands markets for US exports, and safeguards human rights and other core US aspirations. Well-designed trade and investment policies are indispensable tools to achieve these objectives.Link

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Does Productivity Still Determine Worker Compensation? Domestic and International Evidence

Does Productivity Still Determine Worker Compensation? Domestic and International Evidence. Robert Lawrence, 2016, Book Chapter. “The American dream is that each generation should live twice as well as the previous one, and this requires that incomes rise at an annual rate of around 2 percent per year. At this pace, incomes will double every 35 years. Between 1947 and 1970, average real compensation in the US increased at annual rate of 2.6 percent—a pace that was actually faster than required to achieve the dream. But since 1970, the average real compensation of US workers has grown at less than 1 percent per year, and at that pace it would take almost a lifetime to see incomes double.Link

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Adjustment and Income Distribution Impacts on the TPP

Adjustment and Income Distribution Impacts on the TPP. Robert Lawrence, April 2016, Book Chapter. “Like all free trade agreements, the Trans-Pacifi c Partnership (TPP) will yield gains to the economy in general but force difficult adjustments on some workers and businesses. Peter A. Petri and Michael G. Plummer (2016) find that the agreement will benefi t the United States as a whole, raise real wages of both skilled and unskilled workers, and increase the real return to capital. It will, however, hurt some workers. In particular, some workers will be displaced by imports and lose income from being unemployed or earning less in their new jobs.Link

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