Found 133 article(s) for author 'Ricardo Hausmann'

How Should Uganda Grow?

How Should Uganda Grow? Ricardo Hausmann, February 2014, Paper. “Income per capita in Uganda has doubled in the last 20 years. This remarkable performance has been buoyed by significant aid flows and large external imbalances. Economic growth has been concentrated in non-tradable activities leading to growing external imbalances and a growing gap between rural and urban incomes. Future growth will depend on achieving sufficient export dynamism. In addition, growth faces a number of other challenges: low urbanization rate, rapid rural population growth and high dependency ratios. However, both the dependency…” Link verified August 21, 2014

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A Brain’s View of Economics

A Brain’s View of Economics. Ricardo Hausmann, January 29, 2014, Opinion. In his pathbreaking 2005 book On Intelligence, Jeff Hawkins proposed an alternative paradigm of how the human brain works. In his view, the brain is not a Turing machine that manipulates symbols according to a table of rules, which is the model on which computers and artificial intelligence have been based. Instead, the brain is a giant hierarchical memory that is constantly recording what it perceives and predicting what will come next. The brain makes predictions by finding similarities between patterns in recent sensory inputs and previous experiences stored in its vast memory…” Link

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How Should Uganda Grow?

How Should Uganda Grow? Ricardo Hausmann, January 14, 2014, Paper, “Income per capita in Uganda has doubled in the last 20 years. This remarkable performance has been buoyed by significant aid flows and large external imbalances. Economic growth has been concentrated in non-tradable activities leading to growing external imbalances and a growing gap between rural and urban incomes. Future growth will depend on achieving sufficient export dynamism. In addition, growth faces a number of other challenges: low urbanization rate, rapid rural population growth and high dependency ratios. However, both the dependency ratio and fertility rates have begun to decline recently. Rural areas are also severely overcrowded with low-productivity subsistence agriculture as a pervasive form of production. Commercial agriculture has great possibilities to increase output, but as the sector improves its access to capital, inputs and technology it will shed jobs rather than create them.” Link

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The Global Gender Gap Report 2014

The Global Gender Gap Report 2014. Ricardo Hausmann, 2014, Paper. “Through the Global Gender Gap Report 2014, the World Economic Forum quantifies the magnitude of gender-based disparities and tracks their progress over time. While no single measure can capture the complete situation, the Global Gender Gap Index presented in this Report seeks to measure one important aspect of gender equality: the relative gaps between women and men across four key areas: health, education, economy and politics…” Link

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Implied Comparative Advantage

Implied Comparative Advantage. Ricardo Hausmann, January 2014. “Ricardian theories of production often take the comparative advantage of locations in different industries to be uncorrelated. They are seen as the outcome of the real- ization of a random extreme value distribution. These theories do not take a stance regarding the counterfactual or implied comparative advantage if the country does not make the product. Here, we find that industries in countries and cities tend to have a relative size that is systematically correlated…Link

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Neighbors and the evolution of the comparative advantage of nations: Evidence of international knowledge diffusion?

Neighbors and the evolution of the comparative advantage of nations: Evidence of international knowledge diffusion? Ricardo Hausmann, January 2014, Paper. “The literature on knowledge diffusion shows that knowledge decays strongly with distance. In this paper we document that the probability that a product is added to a country’s export basket is, on average, 65% larger if a neighboring country is a successful exporter of that same product…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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The Specialization Myth

The Specialization Myth. Ricardo Hausmann, December 30, 2013, Opinion. “Some ideas are intuitive. Others sound so obvious after they are expressed that it is hard to deny their truth. They are powerful, because they have many nonobvious implications. They put one in a different frame of mind when looking at the world and deciding how to act on it. One such idea is the notion that cities, regions, and countries should specialize. Because they cannot be good at everything, they must concentrate on what they are best at – that is, on their comparative advantage. They should make a few things very well and exchange them for other goods…” Link

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Why Countries Grow

Why Countries Grow. Ricardo Hausmann, October 23, 2013, Video. “Nations rich in transferable skills have more growth potential than those that merely exploit their natural resources, according to Harvard’s Ricardo Hausmann. In part one of a discussion with John Authers he explains how to map a country’s usefulness…” Link verified August 21, 2014

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Housing versus Habitat

Housing versus Habitat. Ricardo Hausmann, September 26, 2013, Opinion. “Peter Drucker, the influential management guru, famously said, ‘What does not get measured, does not get done.’ He might have added that what gets measured poorly gets done poorly. Consider low-income housing. Most developing countries, and many rich ones, define their housing deficit according to the number of families living in units deemed socially unacceptable. But what is meant by unacceptable varies greatly from country to country. Piped water, sewerage, and electricity are seen as essential in the Americas, but not in India…” Link

 

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