Found 137 article(s) for author 'Ricardo Hausmann'

Female Labor in Jordan: A Systematic Approach to the Exclusion Puzzle

Female Labor in Jordan: A Systematic Approach to the Exclusion Puzzle. Ricardo Hausmann, Tim O’Brien, Miguel Santos, October 2019, Paper, “Women in Jordan are excluded from labor market opportunities at among the highest rates in the world. Previous efforts to explain this outcome have focused on specific, isolated aspects of the problem and have not exploited available datasets to test across causal explanations. We develop a comprehensive framework to analyze the drivers of low female employment rates in Jordan and systematically test their validity, using micro-level data from Employment and Unemployment Surveys (2008-2018) and the Jordanian Labor Market Panel Survey (2010-2016). We find that the nature of low female inclusion in Jordan’s labor market varies significantly with educational attainment, and identify evidence for different factors affecting different educational groups. Among women with high school education or less, we observe extremely low participation levels and find the strongest evidence for this phenomenon tracing to traditional social norms and poor public transportation. On the higher end of the education spectrum – university graduates and above – we find that the problem is not one of participation, but rather of unemployment, which we attribute to a small and undiversified private sector that is unable to accommodate women’s needs for work and work-family balance.Link

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Don’t Blame Economics, Blame Public Policy

Don’t Blame Economics, Blame Public Policy. Ricardo Hausmann, September 1, 2019, Opinion, “Engineering and medicine have in many respects become separate from their respective underlying sciences of physics and biology. Public-policy schools, which typically have a strong economics focus, must now rethink the way they teach students – and medical schools could offer a model to follow.Link

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How to Address Venezuela’s Crushing Debt Burden

How to Address Venezuela’s Crushing Debt Burden. Ricardo Hausmann, July 10, 2019, Opinion, “The legacy of Chávismo includes a mountain of foreign-currency-denominated claims against the Venezuelan public sector, totaling $150 billion, almost all of which is now in default. When Nicolás Maduro finally leaves power, how can these claims be settled while meeting the country’s desperate need for humanitarian relief and economic recovery?Link

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Smart Development Banks

Smart Development Banks. Ricardo Hausmann, 2019, Paper, “The conventional paradigm about development banks is that these institutions exist to target well-identified market failures. However, market failures are not directly observable and can only be ascertained with a suitable learning process. Hence, the question is how do the policymakers know what activities should be promoted, how do they learn about the obstacles to the creation of new activities? Rather than assuming that the government has arrived at the right list of market failures and uses development banks to close some well-identified market gaps, we suggest that development banks can be in charge of identifying these market failures through their loan-screening and lending activities to guide their operations and provide critical inputs for the design of productive development policies. In fact, they can also identify government failures that stand in the way of development and call for needed public inputs. This intelligence role of development banks is similar to the role that modern theories of financial intermediation assign to banks as institutions with a comparative advantage in producing and processing information. However, while private banks focus on information on private returns, development banks would potentially produce and organize information about social returns.Link

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Ricardo Hausmann on Venezuela, Inequality in Productivity, and Policy Lessons for International Development

Ricardo Hausmann on Venezuela, Inequality in Productivity, and Policy Lessons for International Development March 2019. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Ricardo Hausmann, Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at Harvard Kennedy School and Director of the Center for International Development at Harvard University, on Venezuela, inequality in productivity, and policy lessons for international development. | […]

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Humanitarian Markets

Humanitarian Markets. Ricardo Hausmann, March 25, 2019, Opinion, “The role of humanitarian assistance is like that of a car battery: it gets the cylinders moving until the sequence of internal explosions in the engine recharges the battery and makes the process self-sustaining. That task is made easier by using, rather than replacing, markets.Link

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Jordan: The Elements of a Growth Strategy

Jordan: The Elements of a Growth Strategy. Ricardo Hausmann, Tim O’Brien, Miguel Angel Santos,  2019, Paper, “In the decade prior to the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, Jordan enjoyed a period of impressive macroeconomic performance. The prolonged expansion was export-led, with total exports of goods and services tripling over that period. The boom was not only due to better prices for Jordan’s exports, as there were also significant gains in global market share of Jordan’s garment, agriculture and chemical exports. Throughout these years, the country ran large current account deficits that were largely financed by massive inflows of foreign direct investment (FDI) coming from the United Arab Emirates, United States, India, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. By 2009, the size of total public debt was moderate, at 55% of the size of the economy. The Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009 and a series of subsequent negative external shocks affected Jordan in significant ways, throwing its economy out of balance. Conflict in neighboring countries led to reduced demand from key export markets and cut off important trade routes. FDI, which averaged 12.7% of gross domestic product (GDP) over the period 2003-2009, fell to 5.1% of GDP over the period of 2010-2017. At the same time, they brought a massive wave of migrants and refugees, resulting in a net population increase of 50.4% between 2008 and 2017.Link

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