Found 134 article(s) for author 'Ricardo Hausmann'

Smart Development Banks

Smart Development Banks. Ricardo Hausmann, 2019, Paper, “The conventional paradigm about development banks is that these institutions exist to target well-identified market failures. However, market failures are not directly observable and can only be ascertained with a suitable learning process. Hence, the question is how do the policymakers know what activities should be promoted, how do they learn about the obstacles to the creation of new activities? Rather than assuming that the government has arrived at the right list of market failures and uses development banks to close some well-identified market gaps, we suggest that development banks can be in charge of identifying these market failures through their loan-screening and lending activities to guide their operations and provide critical inputs for the design of productive development policies. In fact, they can also identify government failures that stand in the way of development and call for needed public inputs. This intelligence role of development banks is similar to the role that modern theories of financial intermediation assign to banks as institutions with a comparative advantage in producing and processing information. However, while private banks focus on information on private returns, development banks would potentially produce and organize information about social returns.Link

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Ricardo Hausmann on Venezuela, Inequality in Productivity, and Policy Lessons for International Development

Ricardo Hausmann on Venezuela, Inequality in Productivity, and Policy Lessons for International Development March 2019. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Ricardo Hausmann, Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at Harvard Kennedy School and Director of the Center for International Development at Harvard University, on Venezuela, inequality in productivity, and policy lessons for international development. | […]

Tags: , , ,

Humanitarian Markets

Humanitarian Markets. Ricardo Hausmann, March 25, 2019, Opinion, “The role of humanitarian assistance is like that of a car battery: it gets the cylinders moving until the sequence of internal explosions in the engine recharges the battery and makes the process self-sustaining. That task is made easier by using, rather than replacing, markets.Link

Tags: , , ,

Jordan: The Elements of a Growth Strategy

Jordan: The Elements of a Growth Strategy. Ricardo Hausmann, Tim O’Brien, Miguel Angel Santos,  2019, Paper, “In the decade prior to the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, Jordan enjoyed a period of impressive macroeconomic performance. The prolonged expansion was export-led, with total exports of goods and services tripling over that period. The boom was not only due to better prices for Jordan’s exports, as there were also significant gains in global market share of Jordan’s garment, agriculture and chemical exports. Throughout these years, the country ran large current account deficits that were largely financed by massive inflows of foreign direct investment (FDI) coming from the United Arab Emirates, United States, India, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. By 2009, the size of total public debt was moderate, at 55% of the size of the economy. The Global Financial Crisis of 2008-2009 and a series of subsequent negative external shocks affected Jordan in significant ways, throwing its economy out of balance. Conflict in neighboring countries led to reduced demand from key export markets and cut off important trade routes. FDI, which averaged 12.7% of gross domestic product (GDP) over the period 2003-2009, fell to 5.1% of GDP over the period of 2010-2017. At the same time, they brought a massive wave of migrants and refugees, resulting in a net population increase of 50.4% between 2008 and 2017.Link

Tags: , , , , , , ,

China’s Malign Secrecy

China’s Malign Secrecy. Ricardo Hausmann, January 2, 2019, Opinion, “In principle, China’s massive savings, infrastructure know-how, and willingness to lend could be great for developing economies. Alas, as many countries have learned the hard way, Chinese development finance often delivers a corruption-filled sugar high to the economy, followed by a nasty financial (and sometimes political) hangover.Link

Tags: , , , , ,

Machine-learned patterns suggest that diversification drives economic development

Machine-learned patterns suggest that diversification drives economic development. Ricardo Hausmann, Matthew Bonds, December 11, 2018, Paper, “We develop a machine-learning-based method, Principal Smooth-Dynamics Analysis (PriSDA), to identify patterns in economic development and to automate the development of new theory of economic dynamics. Traditionally, economic growth is modeled with a few aggregate quantities derived from simplified theoretical models. Here, PriSDA identifies important quantities. Applied to 55 years of data on countries’ exports, PriSDA finds that what most distinguishes countries’ export baskets is their diversity, with extra weight assigned to more sophisticated products. The weights are consistent with previous measures of product complexity in the literature. The second dimension of variation is a proficiency in machinery relative to agriculture. PriSDA then couples these quantities with per-capita income and infers the dynamics of the system over time. According to PriSDA, the pattern of economic development of countries is dominated by a tendency toward increased diversification. Moreover, economies appear to become richer after they diversify (i.e., diversity precedes growth). The model predicts that middle-income countries with diverse export baskets will grow the fastest in the coming decades, and that countries will converge onto intermediate levels of income and specialization. PriSDA is generalizable and may illuminate dynamics of elusive quantities such as diversity and complexity in other natural and social systems.” Link

Tags: , , ,

The workforce of pioneer plants: The role of worker mobility in the diffusion of industries

The workforce of pioneer plants: The role of worker mobility in the diffusion of industries. Ricardo Hausmann, October 2018, Paper, “Because many skills are tacit and specific to an industry, the diffusion of industries and the technologies they employ often requires that workers skilled in the use of these technologies relocate to the new region…Link

Tags: , , , , , , , ,