Found 6 article(s) for author 'Rema Hanna'

Environmental Economics, Developing Nations and Michael Greenstone

Environmental Economics, Developing Nations and Michael Greenstone. Rema Hanna, 2019, Book Chapter, “I am very excited for this opportunity to honor Michael Greenstone and his work in shaping how we think about environmental economics in developing countries. What I’d like to do today is talk about Michael’s contributions in development and environmental economics, particularly around why we even really care that environmental economics is being focused on developing countries. I also will discuss work with Michael that illustrates the complexity of crafting effective environmental policy in developing countries and the potentially big pay-offs of effective policy.Link

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Universal Basic Incomes vs. Targeted Transfers: Anti-Poverty Programs in Developing Countries

Universal Basic Incomes vs. Targeted Transfers: Anti-Poverty Programs in Developing Countries. Rema Hanna, August 2018, Paper, ” Developing country governments are increasingly implementing cash assistance programs to combat poverty and inequality. This paper examines the potential tradeoffs between targeting these transfers towards low income households versus providing universal cash transfers, also known as a Universal Basic Income. We start by discussing how the fact that most households in poor countries do not pay income taxes changes how we conceptually think about Universal Basic Incomes. We then analyze data from two countries, Indonesia and Peru, to document the tradeoffs involved.Link

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Implementation Ups and Downs: Monitoring Attendance to Improve Public Services for the Poor in India

Implementation Ups and Downs: Monitoring Attendance to Improve Public Services for the Poor in India. Rema Hanna, July 14, 2018, Paper, “High levels of absenteeism among health workers and teachers have negative effects on citizen health and human capital development. An attendance-monitoring intervention in schools reduced absenteeism and improved test scores, but the impact on health care workers was limited.Link

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Cumulative Impacts of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs: Experimental Evidence from Indonesia

Cumulative Impacts of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs: Experimental Evidence from Indonesia. Rema Hanna, May 2018, Paper, “Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs have spread worldwide, and are designed to promote comprehensive human capital investments in children, starting from encouraging pre-natal and maternal care and early childhood health interventions and continuing through incentivizing school attendance. Yet evaluating these claims over more than a few years is hard, as most CCT experiments extend the program to the control group after a short experimental period. This paper experimentally estimates the impacts of Indonesia’s cash transfer program (PKH) six years after the program launched, using data from about 14,000 households in 360 sub-districts across Indonesia, taking advantage of the fact that treatment and control locations remained largely intact throughout the period.Link

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Technology Beats Corruption

Technology Beats Corruption, Rema Hanna, January 20, 2017, Paper, “More than 1.9 billion individuals in the developing world benefit from social safety net programs: noncontributory transfer programs that distribute cash or basic in-kind products to the poor. But despite their importance, high levels of corruption often stifle the effectiveness of these programs. If cash transfer programs are particularly prone to graft, then in-kind programs should be preferred in practice. In a recent paper, Muralidharan et al. report evidence to the contrary by showing that use of a modern banking technology—biometric smart cards—can help to drastically reduce corruption in cash transfer programs.Link

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Does Elite Capture Matter? Local Elites and Targeted Welfare Programs in Indonesia

Does Elite Capture Matter? Local Elites and Targeted Welfare Programs in Indonesia. Rema Hanna, February 2013, Paper. “This paper investigates the impact of elite capture on the allocation of targeted government welfare programs in Indonesia, using both a high-stakes field experiment that varied the extent of elite influence and non-experimental data on a variety of existing government transfer programs. Conditional on their consumption level, there is little evidence that village elites and their relatives are more likely to receive aid programs than non-elites. However, this overall result masks…” Link verified August 21, 2014

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