Found 698 article(s) for author 'Regulation'

A Unified Welfare Analysis of Government Policies

A Unified Welfare Analysis of Government Policies. Nathaniel Hendren, August 2018, Paper, “We conduct a comparative welfare analysis of 133 historical policy changes over the past half-century in the United States, focusing on policies in social insurance, education and job training, taxes and cash transfers, and in-kind transfers. For each policy, we use existing causal estimates to calculate both the benefit that each policy provides its recipients (measured as their willingness to pay) and the policy’s net cost, inclusive of long-term impacts on the government’s budget. We divide the willingness to pay by the net cost to the government to form each policy’s Marginal Value of Public Funds, or its “MVPF”. Comparing MVPFs across policies provides a unified method of assessing their impact on social welfare. Our results suggest that direct investments in low-income children’s health and education have historically had the highest MVPFs, on average exceeding 5. Many such policies have paid for themselves as governments recouped the cost of their initial expenditures through additional taxes collected and reduced transfers.Link

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Prices versus Quantities across Jurisdictions

Prices versus Quantities across Jurisdictions. Martin Weitzman, August 9, 2019, Paper, “We extend the standard “prices versus quantities” framework for pollution control to cover multiple heterogeneous jurisdictions interacting strategically with each other. When multi-jurisdictional externalities are present and the uncertainties among jurisdictions are independent, the regulatory game exhibits a unique subgame perfect equilibrium. For any one jurisdiction, the equilibrium choice of instrument is given by the sign of the original prices versus quantities formula. Thus, it is an optimal strategy for a jurisdiction to choose a price instrument when the slope of its own marginal benefit is less than the slope of its own marginal cost and a quantity instrument when this condition is reversed. The result suggests that the original nonstrategic criterion for the comparative advantage of prices over quantities may have wider applicability to determining instrument choice in a noncooperative strategic environment.Link

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Costs, Benefits and Regulation Post-Trump

Costs, Benefits and Regulation Post-Trump. Cass Sunstein, August 1, 2019, Opinion, ““I told you so.” That is what some progressives are saying about bipartisan policies that Democratic presidents carried over from their Republican predecessors and that the Trump administration is sometimes putting in a less-than-wonderful light.Link

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Rethinking the Regulation of Employment Discharge: The Design of a Monetary Resolution System

Rethinking the Regulation of Employment Discharge: The Design of a Monetary Resolution System. J. Mark Ramseyer, July 4, 2019, Paper, “Should a firm try to discharge an employee, Japanese judges swat it hard. They have been swatting firms hard since the early 1950s. Before the war, most workers and firms had used at-will contracts, and judges had enforced them: workers could quit when they wanted, and firms could discharge them when they wanted. After the war, the Supreme Command for the Allied Powers (SCAP) freed the socialists and communists from prison, and both groups quickly started unionizing the work force. When firms now tried to discharge workers, the unions struck. They could strike violently: When the national railway tried to slash its work force, someone ran an unmanned train into…” Link

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Climate Change, Climate Policy, and Economic Growth

Climate Change, Climate Policy, and Economic Growth. James Stock, July 1, 2019, Paper, “The topics of climate change and climate change policy encompass a complex mixture of the natural sciences, economics, and a mass of institutional, legal, and technical details. This complexity and multidisciplinary nature make it difficult for thoughtful citizens to reach their own conclusions on the topic and for potentially interested economists to know where to start. This essay aims to provide a point of entry for macroeconomists interested in climate change and climate change policy but with no special knowledge of the field. I therefore start at the beginning, with some basic background on climate change, presented through the eyes of an econometrician. I then turn to climate policy in the United States. That discussion points to a large number of researchable open questions which macroeconomists are particularly well-suited to tackle.Link

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Procedural Justice and the Risks of Consumer Voting

Procedural Justice and the Risks of Consumer Voting. Leslie John, Michael I. Norton, 2019, Paper, “Firms are increasingly giving consumers the vote. Eight studies demonstrate that when firms empower consumers to vote, consumers infer a series of implicit promises—even in the absence of explicit promises. We identify three implicit promises to which consumers react negatively when violated: representation (Experiments 1A–1C); consistency (Experiment 2), and non-suppression (Experiment 3). However, when firms honor these implicit promises, voting can mitigate the disappointment that arises from receiving an undesired outcome (Experiment 4). Finally, Experiment 5 identifies one instance when suppressing the vote outcome is condoned: when voters believe that the process of voting has resulted in an unacceptable outcome. More generally, we show that procedural justice plays a key mediating role in determining the relative success or failure of various empowerment initiatives—from soliciting feedback to voting. Taken together, we offer insight into how firms can realize the benefits of empowerment strategies while mitigating their risks.Link

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The Macroeconomic Implications of Housing Supply Restrictions

The Macroeconomic Implications of Housing Supply Restrictions. Edward Glaeser, June 15, 2019, Paper, “Housing supply restrictions, including historic preservation policies, minimum lot sizes and height limitations, are typically approached with static Pigouvian tools, but these policies also have dynamic implications. Restricted supply will typically make quantities, which determine construction employment, less volatile, and prices, which determine financial stability, more volatile. A prominent exception occurs when supply-unconstrained areas build so much during a boom that construction halts during the bust, and in that case, elastic supply can be associated with both price volatility and a limited ability to use credit instruments to boost employment during a bust. As institutions with counter-cyclical missions grapple with housing policies, they must recognize that housing regulation interacts with monetary policy, and that reforming housing policy may have implications for the business cycle.Link

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Can Global Rules Prevent National Self-Harm?

Can Global Rules Prevent National Self-Harm? Dani Rodrik, June 11, 2019, Opinion, “Most policy mishaps in the world economy today – as in the case of US President Donald Trump’s tariffs – occur as a result of failures at the national level, not because of a lack of international cooperation. And, with the exception of two types of cases, countries should be allowed to make their own mistakes.Link

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For International Cap-and-Trade in Carbon Permits, Price Stabilization Introduces Secondary Free-Rider-Type Problems

For International Cap-and-Trade in Carbon Permits, Price Stabilization Introduces Secondary Free-Rider-Type Problems. Martin Weitzman, June 7, 2019, Paper, “In this brief note (Without holding them responsible for errors, omissions, or interpretations, I am grateful for constructive comments on an earlier version of this note by Joseph Aldy, Severin Borenstein, Maureen Cropper, Carolyn Fischer, Meredith Fowlie, Lawrence Goulder, Geoffrey Heal, N. Gregory Mankiw, Michael Mehling, Gilbert Metcalf, Adele Morris, Ian Parry, William Pizer, Simon Quemin, Andrew Schein, Richard Schmalensee, E. Somanathan, Robert Stavins, David Victor, and Gernot Wagner.), I take the initial allocation of carbon emissions as a prototype international public goods problem. Overcoming the free-rider problem in carbon emissions is central to a successful comprehensive international climate-change agreement. Volunteerism alone may go part way, but is unlikely to fully adequately overcome this free-rider problem. (The numerical values of the pledged “Nationally Determined Contributions” under the Paris Agreement are voluntary, although the Paris Agreement itself may help constructively by laying a legal foundation for participation, reporting, verification, transparency, and trust.)Link

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