Found 27 article(s) for author 'Raj Chetty'

Measuring the Impact of Teachers I: Evaluating Bias in Teacher Value-Added Estimates

Measuring the Impact of Teachers I: Evaluating Bias in Teacher Value-Added Estimates. Raj Chetty, John N. Friedman, 2014, Paper. “Are teachers’ impacts on students’ test scores (“value-added”) a good measure of their quality? One reason this question has sparked debate is disagreement about whether value-added (VA) measures provide unbiased estimates of teachers’ causal impacts on student achievement. We test for bias in VA using previously unobserved parent characteristics and a quasi-experimental design based on changes in teaching staff. Using school district and tax records for…” Link

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Measuring the Impact of Teachers II: Teacher Value-Added and Student Outcomes in Adulthood

Measuring the Impact of Teachers II: Teacher Value-Added and Student Outcomes in Adulthood. Raj Chetty, John N. Friedman, 2014, Paper. “Are teachers’ impacts on students’ test scores (“value-added”) a good measure of their quality? This question has sparked debate partly because of a lack of evidence on whether high value-added (VA) teachers improve students’ long-term outcomes. Using school district and tax records for more than one million children, we find that students assigned to high-VA teachers are more likely to attend college, earn higher salaries, and are less likely to have children as teenagers. Replacing a teacher whose VA is in the bottom 5% with an average teacher would increase the present value of students’ lifetime income by approximately $250,000…” Link verified August 21, 2014

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Is the United States Still a Land of Opportunity? Recent Trends in Intergenerational Mobility

Is the United States Still a Land of Opportunity? Recent Trends in Intergenerational Mobility. Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, January 2014, Paper. “We present new evidence on trends in intergenerational mobility in the U.S. using administrative earnings records. We find that percentile rank-based measures of intergenerational mobility have remained extremely stable for the 1971-1993 birth cohorts. For children born between 1971 and 1986, we measure intergenerational mobility based on the correlation between parent and child income percentile ranks. For more recent cohorts, we measure mobility…” Link

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Is the United States Still a Land of Opportunity? Recent Trends in Intergenerational Mobility

Is the United States Still a Land of Opportunity? Recent Trends in Intergenerational Mobility, Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, January 2014, Paper. “We present new evidence on trends in intergenerational mobility in the U.S. using administrative earnings records. We find that percentile rank-based measures of intergenerational mobility have remained extremely stable for the 1971-1993 birth cohorts. For children born between 1971 and 1986, we measure intergenerational mobility based on the correlation between parent and child income percentile ranks…” Link

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THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF TAX EXPENDITURES: EVIDENCE FROM SPATIAL VARIATION ACROSS THE U.S.

THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF TAX EXPENDITURES: EVIDENCE FROM SPATIAL VARIATION ACROSS THE U.S. Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, April 2013, Paper. “Enabling children to rise out of poverty is a primary goal of policies such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and other tax expenditures. We study whether tax expenditures are effective in achieving this goal by asking whether differences in tax expenditures across areas of the U.S. are correlated with the economic outcomes of children from poor families…” Link

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How Does Your Kindergarten Classroom Affect Your Earnings? Evidence from Project STAR

How Does Your Kindergarten Classroom Affect Your Earnings? Evidence from Project STAR. Raj Chetty, John N. Friedman, 2010, Paper. “In Project STAR, 11,571 students in Tennessee and their teachers were randomly assigned to classrooms within their schools from kindergarten to third grade. This paper evaluates the long-term impacts of STAR by linking the experimental data to administrative records. We first demonstrate that kindergarten test scores are highly correlated with outcome such as earnings at age 27, college attendance, home ownership, and retirement savings. We then document…” Link

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The Spike at Benefit Exhaustion: Leaving the Unemployment System or Starting a New Job?

The Spike at Benefit Exhaustion: Leaving the Unemployment System or Starting a New Job? Raj Chetty, 2007, Paper. “In this paper, we review the literature on the spike in unemployment exit rates around benefit exhaustion, and present new evidence based on administrative data for a large sample of job losers in Austria. We and that the way unemployment spells are measured has a large e§ect on the magnitude of the spike at exhaustion, both in existing studies and in our Austrian data. Spikes are typically much smaller when spell length is defined by the time to next job than when it is defined by the time spent on the unemployment system...” Link

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