Found 10 article(s) for author 'Race'

Race, Work, and Leadership: New Perspectives on the Black Experience

Race, Work, and Leadership: New Perspectives on the Black Experience. Anthony Mayo, David Thomas, , “Work, and Leadership is a rare and important compilation of essays that examines how race matters in people’s experience of work and leadership. What does it mean to be black in corporate America today? How are racial dynamics in organizations changing? How do we build inclusive organizations? Inspired by and developed in conjunction with the research and programming for Harvard Business School’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the HBS African American Student Union, this groundbreaking book shines new light on these and other timely questions and illuminates the present-day dynamics of race in the workplace. Contributions from top scholars, researchers, and practitioners in leadership, organizational behavior, psychology, sociology, and education test the relevance of long-held assumptions and reconsider the research approaches and interventions needed to understand and advance African Americans in work settings and leadership roles. At a time when there are fewer African American men and women in corporate leadership roles, Race, Work, and Leadership will stimulate new scholarship and dialogue on the organizational and leadership challenges of African Americans and become the indispensable reference for anyone committed to understanding, studying, and acting on the challenges facing leaders who are building inclusive organizations.Link

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Racial wealth inequality: Social problems and solutions

Racial wealth inequality: Social problems and solutions. Alexandra Killewald, June 3, 2019, Video, “White college graduates have over seven times more wealth than black college graduates and nearly four times more wealth than Latino college graduates. White single parents have roughly two times more wealth than two-parent black and Latino households. Rather than education, family structure, or conspicuous consumption, scholars point to historic policies (e.g., Homestead Act, GI Bill, Social Security) that have excluded minorities from having similar wealth-building opportunities as white individuals. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that discrimination and structural racism are among contemporary drivers that prevent minority communities from obtaining equitable housing loans, adequate neighborhood resources (such as grocery stores and healthcare services), and access to jobs and education. A series of policy solutions including student loan forgiveness, universal basic income, federal job guarantee, baby bonds, and reparations have been presented as potential solutions.Link

 

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Intergenerational Wealth Mobility and Racial Inequality

Intergenerational Wealth Mobility and Racial Inequality. Alexandra Killewald, 2019, Paper, “The black-white gap in household wealth is large and well documented. Here, we visualize how this racial wealth gap persists across generations. Animating the flow of individuals between the relative wealth position of parents and their adult children, we show that the disadvantage of black families is a consequence both of wealth inequality in prior generations and race differences in the transmission of wealth positions across generations: Black children both have less wealthy parents on average and are far more likely to be downwardly mobile in household wealth. By displaying intergenerational movements between parental and offspring wealth quintiles, we underline how intergenerational fluctuation coexists with the maintenance of a severely racialized wealth structure.Link

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The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: The Role of Race

The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: The Role of Race. George Borjas, January 30, 2019, Paper, “The author’s 2017 reappraisal of the impact of the Mariel supply shock revealed that the wage of low-skill workers declined in post-Mariel Miami. Clemens and Hunt (2019) assert that a data quirk in the March CPS—specifically, a substantial increase in the black share of Miami’s low-skill workforce in the period—implies that those wage trends do not correctly measure the impact of the Marielitos. Because blacks earn less than whites earn, the increased black share would spuriously reduce the average low-skill wage in Miami. The author examines the sensitivity of the evidence to the change in the racial composition of the sample. The Clemens and Hunt assertion is demonstrably false. The timing of the post-Mariel decline in Miami’s wage does not coincide with the increase in the black share. And sensible adjustments for racial composition do not change the finding that Miami’s low-skill wage fell after 1980.Link

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Falling Behind: The Role of Inter- and Intragenerational Processes in Widening Racial and Ethnic Wealth Gaps through Early and Middle Adulthood

Falling Behind: The Role of Inter- and Intragenerational Processes in Widening Racial and Ethnic Wealth Gaps through Early and Middle Adulthood. Alexandra Killewald, July 13, 2018, Paper, “Whites’ wealth advantage compared to blacks and Hispanics is vast and increases with age. While prior research on wealth gaps focuses primarily on wealth levels, we adopt a life-course perspective that treats wealth as a cumulative outcome and examine wealth accumulation across individuals’ lives. We test to what extent intergenerational disadvantage and disparities in achieved characteristics explain accumulation disparities. We hypothesize that disparities in wealth determinants, like income and education, family and household characteristics, and homeownership and local context, increase through early and middle adulthood, widening wealth accumulation gaps.Link

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Race and Economic Opportunity in the United States: An Intergenerational Perspective

Race and Economic Opportunity in the United States: An Intergenerational Perspective. Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, March 2018, Paper, “We study the sources of racial and ethnic disparities in income using de-identified longitudinal data covering nearly the entire U.S. population from 1989-2015. We document three sets of results. First, the intergenerational persistence of disparities varies substantially across racial groups. For example, Hispanic Americans are moving up significantly in the income distribution across generations because they have relatively high rates of intergenerational income mobility. In contrast, black Americans have substantially lower rates of upward mobility and higher rates of downward mobility than whites, leading to large income disparities that persist across generations.Link

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Race, Class, Politics, and the Disappearance of Work

Race, Class, Politics, and the Disappearance of Work. Jennifer Hochschild, June 5, 2017, Paper, ““When Work Disappears” has shaped research agendas on poverty, racial hierarchy, and urban social and economic dynamics. That is a lot for one article, yet two issues warrant more analysis. They are the ways in which socially defined “race” – rather than or in combination with class – explains the impact of sustained joblessness, and the political behaviours that may emerge in response to work’s disappearance. I point to evidence showing that both race and class have independent associations with the loss of work in poor African-American communities, as well as interactive effects. In the political arena – too often neglected by sociologists studying poverty – sustained, community-wide joblessness or underemployment are associated both with withdrawal from political engagement and with the recent resurgence of right-wing populism. Even after several decades of intensive research, we have more to learn about the interactions of race, class, politics, and the disappearance of work.Link

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Racial Inequality in Employment and Earnings after Incarceration

Racial Inequality in Employment and Earnings after Incarceration. Bruce Western, February 2017, Paper, “This paper analyzes monthly employment and earnings in the year after incarceration with survey data from a sample of individuals just released from prison. More than in earlier research, the data provide detailed measurement of temporary and informal employment and richly describe the labor market disadvantages of formerly-incarcerated men and women. We find that half the sample is jobless in any given month and average earnings are well below the poverty level. Jointly modeling employment and earnings, blacks and Hispanics are estimated to have lower total earnings than whites even after accounting for health, human capital, and criminal involvement.Link

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Who speaks for the dispossessed?

Who speaks for the dispossessed? Matthew Desmond, April 22, 2015, Paper. “This commentary articulates three perspectives on race in America: economic determinism, institutionalism and a field-theoretic approach. It argues that William Julius Wilson’s masterwork, The Declining Significance of Race, was informed by the first and anticipated the latter two. Wilson’s most profound and enduring legacy is his unwavering concern for the dispossessed...” Link

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Slavery, Inequality, and Economic Development in the Americas: An Examination of the Engerman-Sokoloff Hypothesis

Slavery, Inequality, and Economic Development in the Americas: An Examination of the Engerman-Sokoloff Hypothesis, Nathan Nunn, October 2007, Book Chapter. “Recent research argues that among former New World colonies a nation’s past dependence on slave labor was important for its subsequent economic development (Engerman and Sokoloff, 1997, 2002). It is argued that specialization in plantation agriculture, with its use of slave labor, caused economic inequality, which concentrated power in the hands of a small elite, adversely affecting the development of domestic institutions needed for sustained economic growth…” Link

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