Found 22 article(s) for author 'Political Economy'

Varieties of Outward Chinese Capital: Domestic Politics Status and Globalization of Chinese Firms

Varieties of Outward Chinese Capital: Domestic Politics Status and Globalization of Chinese Firms. Meg Rithmire, , Paper, “A great deal of scholarly and popular attention has been devoted the “specter of global China” (Lee 2017). Contemporary China has been interacting with and shaping processes of globalization since it opened its door in 1978, but the more recent spate of attention has focused specifically on Chinese outward investment, which has soared since the early 2000s and especially since the global financial crisis in 2008. Scholars and journalists have sought to understand the extent to which China is “buying the world,” what it means for both the developing world (presumed to be the target) and developed world (presumed to be the competition), and what patterns of investment can illuminate about whether China is “playing our game” (harmonizing with western political and economic institutions) or pursuing a revised world order (Nolan 2013; Steinfeld 2010; Toh 2017).Link

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Crony Capitalism in the Middle East

Crony Capitalism in the Middle East: Business and Politics from Liberalization to the Arab Spring. Ishac Diwan, June 2019, Book, “The popular uprisings in 2011 that overthrew Arab dictators were also a rebuke to crony capitalism, diverted against both rulers and their allied businessmen who monopolize all economic opportunities. While the Middle East has witnessed a growing nexus between business and politics in the wake of liberalization, little is discussed about the nature of business cronies, the sectors in which they operate, the mechanisms used to favour them, and the possible impact of such crony relations on the region’s development. Combining inputs from leading scholars in the field, Crony Capitalism in the Middle East: Business and Politics from Liberalization to the Arab Spring presents a wealth of empirical evidence on the form and function of this aspect of the region.Link

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Identity Politics and Trade Policy

Identity Politics and Trade Policy. Elhanan Helpman, October 2, 2018, Paper, “We characterize trade policies that result from political competition when assessments of wellbeing include both material and psychosocial components. The material component reflects, as usual, satisfaction from consumption. Borrowing from social identity theory, we take the psychosocial component as combining the pride and self-esteem an individual draws from the status of groups with which she identities and a dissonance cost she bears from identifying with those that are different from herself.Link

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Historical Political Economy

Historical Political Economy. Sophus Reinert, August 17, 2018, Book Chapter, “This chapter explores the cyclicality of historical awareness in economics. It shows how, over the centuries, there have been numerous moments when a tendency toward theoretical abstraction has resulted in real-world catastrophes which, in turn, have inspired a return to more historically-grounded approaches to economic inquiry and policy.Link

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The Political Economy of Ideas: On Ideas Versus Interests in Policymaking

The Political Economy of Ideas: On Ideas Versus Interests in Policymaking. Dani Rodrik, March 2018, Paper, “We develop a conceptual framework to highlight the role of ideas as a catalyst for policy and institutional change. We make an explicit distinction between ideas and vested interests and show how they feed into each other. In doing so the paper integrates the Keynes-Hayek perspective on the importance of ideas with the currently more fashionable Stigler-Becker (interests only) approach to political economy. We distinguish between two kinds of ideational politics – the battle among different worldviews on the efficacy of policy (worldview politics) versus the politics of victimhood, pride and identity (identity politics).Link

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New Perspectives on the History of Political Economy

New Perspectives on the History of Political Economy. Sophus Reinert, 2018, Book, “This volume offers a snapshot of the resurgent historiography of political economy in the wake of the ongoing global financial crisis, and suggests fruitful new agendas for research on the political-economic nexus as it has developed in the Western world since the end of the Middle Ages. New Perspectives on the History of Political Economy brings together a select group of young and established scholars from a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds—history, economics, law, and political science—in an effort to begin a re-conceptualization of the origins and history of political economy through a variety of still largely distinct but complementary historical approaches—legal and intellectual, literary and philosophical, political and economic—and from a variety of related perspectives: debt and state finance, tariffs and tax policy, the encouragement and discouragement of trade, merchant communities and companies, smuggling and illicit trades, mercantile and colonial systems, economic cultures, and the history of economic doctrines more narrowly construed.Link

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Collaborative is Superadditive in Political Economics

Collaborative is Superadditive in Political Economics. Richard Zeckhauser, 2017, Book Chapter, “This collection gathers some of the greatest minds in economics to discuss their experiences of collaborative research and publication. Nobel Prize winners and other eminent scholars from a representative sample of economics’ major sub-disciplines share how and why they came to work primarily in partnerships or on their own, whether naturally or by necessity. The contributions include discussions of personal experiences, statistical analyses, different levels of investment, and how the digital age has changed researcher interactions. As budget cuts and resource consolidation make working together vital in ever more fields of academia, this book offers valuable advice to help young and seasoned scholars alike identify the right co-author(s).Link

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Land Institutions and Chinese Political Economy – Institutional Complementarities and Macroeconomic Management

Land Institutions and Chinese Political Economy – Institutional Complementarities and Macroeconomic Management. Meg Elizabeth Rithmire, February 22, 2017, Paper, “This article critically examines the origins and evolution of China’s unique land institutions and situates land policy in the larger context of China’s reforms and pursuit of economic growth. It argues that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has strengthened the institutions that permit land expropriation—namely, urban/rural dualism, decentralized land ownership, and hierarchical land management—in order to use land as a key instrument of macroeconomic regulation, helping the CCP respond to domestic and international economic trends and manage expansion and contraction.Link

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The Political Economy of Transportation Investment

The Political Economy of Transportation Investment. Edward Glaeser, January 2017, Paper, “Will politics lead to over-building or under-building of transportation projects? In this paper, we develop a model of infrastructure policy in which politicians overdo things that have hidden costs and underperform tasks whose costs voters readily perceive. Consequently, national funding of transportation leads to overspending, since voters more readily perceive the upside of new projects than the future taxes that will be paid for distant highways. Yet when local voters are well-informed, the highly salient nuisances of local construction, including land taking and noise, lead to under-building. This framework explains the decline of urban mega-projects in the US (Altshuler and Lubero§ 2003) as the result of increasingly educated and organized urban voters. Our framework also predicts more per capita transportation spending in low-density and less educated areas, which seems to be empirically correct.Link

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