Found 9 article(s) for author 'Nien-he Hsieh'

A Claim to Own Productive Property

A Claim to Own Productive Property. Nien-he Hsieh, 2019, Book Chapter, “The status of economic liberties remains a serious lacuna in the theory and practice of human rights. Should a minimally just society protect the freedoms to sell, save, profit, and invest? Is being prohibited to run a business a human rights violation? While these liberties enjoy virtually no support from the existing philosophical theories of human rights and little protection by the international human rights law, they are of tremendous importance in the lives of individuals, particularly the poor. Like most individual liberties, economic liberties increase our ability to lead our own life. When we enjoy them, we can choose the occupational paths that best fit us and, in so doing, define who they are in relation to others. Furthermore, in the absence of good jobs, economic liberties allow us to create an alternative path to subsistence. This is critical for the millions of working poor in developing countries who earn their livelihoods by engaging in independent economic activities. Insecure economic liberties leave them vulnerable to harassment, bribery, and other forms of abuse from middlemen and public officials. This book opens a debate about the moral and legal status of economic liberties as human rights. It brings together political and legal theorists working in the domain of human rights and global justice, as well as people engaged in the practice of human rights, to engage in both foundational and applied issues concerning these questions.Link

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The social purpose of corporations

The social purpose of corporations. Nien-he Hsieh, November 13, 2018, Paper, “To think about the purpose of corporations is to think about what corporations are for. In the article, argue that the concept of a purpose has an important role in thinking about the moral evaluation of corporations. We make three contributions. First, we distinguish different uses of the concepts of social and corporate purpose. Social purpose concerns the contribution that the corporation makes to realising societal goals. Corporate purpose concerns the goals the corporation should actively pursue. Second, we investigate whether corporations ought to serve a social purpose and whether corporations ought to actively pursue their corporate purpose. Third, we explore critically what roles the concepts of social and corporate purpose can fulfil in moral reflection on and of corporations. In particular, we distinguish the constructive, the communicative, and the critical role of social and corporate purpose.Link

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Business Responsibilities for Human Rights

Business Responsibilities for Human Rights: A Commentary on Arnold. Nien-he Hsieh, 2017, Paper, “Human rights have come to play a prominent role in debates about the responsibilities of business. In the business ethics literature, there are two approaches to the question of whether businesses have human rights obligations. The ‘moral’ approach conceives of human rights as antecedently existing basic moral rights. The ‘institutional’ approach starts with contemporary human rights practice in which human rights refer to rights enumerated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and subsequent international documents, and in which states are the primary duty bearers of human rights. This commentary argues that the implications of adopting one or the other approach are much greater than most scholars recognize, and that we have reason to reject the moral approach and to adopt the institutional approach instead. The commentary highlights key questions that need to be addressed if human rights are to play a central role in framing the responsibilities of business.Link

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The Responsibilities and Role of Business in Relation to Society: Back to Basics?

The Responsibilities and Role of Business in Relation to Society: Back to Basics? Nien-hê Hsieh, April 11, 2017, Paper, “In this address, I outline a “back to basics” approach to specifying the responsibilities and role of business in relation to society. Three “basics” comprise the approach. The first is arguing that basic principles of ordinary morality, such as a duty not to harm, provide an adequate basis for specifying the responsibilities of business managers. The second is framing the role of business in society by looking to the values realized by the basic building blocks of contemporary economic activity, i.e., markets and firms. The third is making explicit the basic institutions that structure the background against which business operates. The aim is to develop a plausible framework for managerial decision making that respects the fact of value pluralism in a global economy and that fosters meaningful criticism of current business practices while remaining sufficiently grounded in contemporary circumstances so as to be relevant for managers. Link

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Should Business Have Human Rights Obligations?

Should Business Have Human Rights Obligations? Nien-hê Hsieh, July 2015, Paper. “Businesses and their managers are increasingly called upon to take on human rights obligations. Focusing on the case of multinational enterprises (MNEs), the paper argues we have reason to reject assigning human rights obligations to business enterprises and their managers. The paper begins by distinguishing business and human rights from the more general topic of corporate responsibility. Following Buchanan (2013), the paper takes the ideal of status egalitarianism to be central to human rights...” Link

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Corporate Social Responsibility and Multinational Corporations

Corporate Social Responsibility and Multinational Corporations. Nien-he Hsieh, 2014, Book Chapter. “A central question that arises from the perspective of global ethics is what standards ought to apply to the activities of multinational corporations (MNCs). This chapter surveys the contemporary theoretical literature on this question. The first section provides background on MNCs and their rise. Section two summarizes attempts to promulgate global standards for MNCs in relation to human rights, labour, bribery, and the natural environment…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 12, 2014

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Can For-Profit Corporations Be Good Citizens? Perspectives from Four Business Leaders

Can For-Profit Corporations Be Good Citizens? Perspectives from Four Business Leaders. Nien-he Hsieh, 2014, Book Chapter. “This chapter serves an epilogue, turning to ask practitioners how they would answer the question, “Can for-profit corporations be good citizens?” In reflecting on their answers, the chapter puts forward an account that grounds the purpose and responsibilities of for-profit corporations in their role in enabling productive activity that allows members of society to meet their needs and wants. This account is contrasted with prevailing accounts in scholarly literature…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Governance and Sustainability at Nike (A)

Governance and Sustainability at Nike (A). Nien-he Hsieh, June 17, 2013, Case. “Two members of Nike’s executive team must decide what sustainability targets to propose to Nike’s CEO and to the corporate responsibility committee of Nike’s board of directors. Set in 2012, the case traces the evolution of Nike’s approach to environmental and social concerns from its origins in student protests against labor conditions in the supply chain in the 1990s through the development of a board-level corporate responsibility (CR) committee in 2001 to the creation of the Sustainable Business & Innovation…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Multinational Corporations, Global Justice and Corporate Responsibility: A Question of Purpose

Multinational Corporations, Global Justice and Corporate Responsibility: A Question of Purpose. Nien-he Hsieh, 2013, Paper. “Do multinational corporations (MNCs) have a responsibility to address unjust conditions—not simply by refraining from contributing to injustice, but also by actively working to bring about a just state of affairs? This paper examines whether this question can be meaningfully addressed without having to engage two contentious debates in contemporary scholarship…” Link Verified October 12, 2014

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