Found 36 article(s) for author 'Lawrence Katz'

The Most Egalitarian of All Professions: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation

The Most Egalitarian of All Professions: Pharmacy and the Evolution of a Family-Friendly Occupation. Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, September 2012, Paper. “Pharmacy has become a female-majority profession that is highly remunerated with a small gender earnings gap and low earnings dispersion relative to other occupations. We sketch a labor market framework based on the theory of equalizing differences to integrate and interpret our empirical findings on earnings, hours of work, and the part-time work wage penalty for pharmacists. Using extensive surveys of pharmacists for…” (May require user account or purchase) Link

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Neighborhood Effects on the Long-Term Well-Being of Low-Income Adults

Neighborhood Effects on the Long-Term Well-Being of Low-Income Adults. Lawrence Katz, Ronald Kessler, July 13, 2012, Paper. “Nearly 9 million Americans live in extreme-poverty neighborhoods, places that also tend to be racially segregated and dangerous. Yet the effects on the well-being of residents of moving out of such communities into less-distressed areas remain uncertain. Using data from Moving to Opportunity, a unique randomized housing mobility experiment, we find that moving from a high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhood leads to long-term (10 to 15 year) improvements in adult physical and mental…” Link

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Notes on Behavioral Economics and Labor Market Policy

Notes on Behavioral Economics and Labor Market Policy. Lawrence Katz, Sendhil Mullainathan, 2012, Paper. “Labor market policies succeed or fail at least in part depending on how well they reflect or account for behavioral responses. Insights from behavioral economics, which allow for realistic deviations from standard economic assumptions about behavior, have consequences for the design and functioning of labor market policies. We review key implications of behavioral economics related to procrastination, difficulties in dealing with complexity, and potentially biased labor market expectations for the design of selected labor market…” Link

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The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators?

The For-Profit Postsecondary School Sector: Nimble Critters or Agile Predators? David Deming, Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, December 2011, Paper. “Private for-profit institutions have been the fastest growing part of the U.S. higher education sector. For-profit enrollment increased from 0.2 percent to 9.1 percent of total enrollment in degree-granting schools from 1970 to 2009, and for-profit institutions account for the majority of enrollments in non-degree granting postsecondary schools. We describe the schools, students, and programs in the for-profit higher education sector, its phenomenal recent growth, and its relationship to the…” Link

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The Cost of Workplace Flexibility for High-Powered Professionals

The Cost of Workplace Flexibility for High-Powered Professionals. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, November 2011, Paper. “We study the pecuniary penalties for family-related amenities in the workplace (e.g., job interruptions, short hours, part-time work, and flexibility during the workday), how women have responded to them, and how the penalties have changed over time. The pecuniary penalties to behaviors that are beneficial to family appear to have decreased in many professions. Self-employment has declined in many of the high-end professions (e.g., pharmacy, optometry, dental, law, medicine, and veterinary medicine) where it was…” Link

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Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment

Neighborhoods, Obesity and Diabetes – A Randomized Social Experiment. Lawrence Katz, Ronald Kessler, October 20, 2011, Paper. “Using data from a large social experiment (Moving to Opportunity), which offered low-income women the chance to move from high-poverty to lower-poverty neighborhoods, this study estimates the association of the randomized intervention with obesity and diabetes.” Link

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Mass Secondary Schooling and the State: The Role of State Compulsion in the High School Movement

Mass Secondary Schooling and the State: The Role of State Compulsion in the High School Movement. Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, August 2011, Book Chapter. “From 1910 to 1940, a period known in U.S. educational history as the high school movement, the fraction of youths enrolled in public and private U.S.
secondary schools increased from 18 to 71 percent. The fraction graduating nationwide soared from 9 to 51 percent and the increase was even greater in most northern and western states. Such increases are as large as those achieved in the recent histories of nations undergoing the most rapid of transitions to mass secondary schooling. In South Korea, for example, the fraction…”
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Grand Challenges in the Study of Employment and Technological Change

Grand Challenges in the Study of Employment and Technological Change. Lawrence Katz, September 29, 2010, Paper. “Leading economists from Paul Samuelson to Paul Krugman have labored to allay the fear that technological advances may reduce overall employment, causing mass unemployment as workers are displaced by machines. This ‘lump of labor fallacy’ – positing that there is a fixed amount of work to be done so that increased labor productivity reduces employment – is intuitively appealing and demonstrably false. Technological improvements create new products and services…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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Putting the Co in Education: Timing, Reasons, and Consequences of College Coeducation from 1835 to the Present

Putting the Co in Education: Timing, Reasons, and Consequences of College Coeducation from 1835 to the Present. Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, August 2010, Paper. “The history of coeducation in U.S. higher education is explored through an analysis of a database containing information on all institutions offering four-year undergraduate degrees that operated in 1897, 1924, 1934, or 1980, most of which still exist today. These data reveal surprises about the timing of coeducation and the reasons for its increase. Rather than being episodic and caused by financial pressures brought about by wars and recessions, the process of…” Link

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The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much

The Future of Inequality: The Other Reason Education Matters So Much, Lawrence Katz, Claudia Goldin, August 22, 2009, Paper. “As almost every economic policy maker is aware, the gap between the wages of educated and less-educated workers has been growing since the early 1980s – and that change has been both large and pervasive even when the measurement is narrowed by gender, industry or occupation. What’s not widely known, though, is that expanding wage inequality is a relatively new phenomenon. In fact, inequality actually narrowed from around 1910 to the 1950s, and then remained fairly stable until the 1980s…” Link 

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