Found 36 article(s) for author 'Lawrence Katz'

Reducing inequality: Neighborhood and school interventions

Reducing inequality: Neighborhood and school interventions. Lawrence Katz, 2015, Paper. “Fifty years after the Civil Rights Act and the declaration of the War on Poverty, much has changed for the better in the United States, but substantial racial inequality persists. Large gaps remain between African Americans and whites in earnings, employment, family income, health, life expectancy, incarceration, teen pregnancy, educational attainment, and academic achievement. Substantial gaps also remain between Hispanics and whites in economic and educational outcomes. Differences in socioeconomic status are increasingly linked to differences in neighborhoods and schools…” Link

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Addressing long-term unemployment in the aftermath of the Great Recession

Addressing long-term unemployment in the aftermath of the Great Recession. Lawrence Katz, December 3, 2014, Paper. “In the aftermath of the Great Recession, there remains a large number of long-term unemployed across countries. This column argues that policies targeting the long-term unemployed, if effective, may have substantial benefits for the aggregate labour markets. However, evidence of the effectiveness of active labour market policies varies across policies and populations…” Link

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The Value of Postsecondary Credentials in the Labor Market: An Experimental Study

The Value of Postsecondary Credentials in the Labor Market: An Experimental Study. Claudia Golden, Lawrence Katz, September 2014. Paper. “We study employers’ perceptions of postsecondary degrees using a field experiment. We randomly assign the sector and selectivity of institution to fictitious resumes and send them to real vacancy postings on a large online job board. According to our results, a bachelor’s degree in business from a for-profit “online” institution is 22 percent less likely to receive a callback than a similar degree from a non-selective public institution…” Link

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Long-Term Unemployment and the Great Recession: The Role of Composition, Duration Dependence, and Non-Participation

Long-Term Unemployment and the Great Recession: The Role of Composition, Duration Dependence, and Non-Participation. Lawrence Katz, June 2014, Paper. “We explore the extent to which composition, duration dependence, and labor force non-participation can account for the sharp increase in the incidence of long-term unemployment (LTU) during the Great Recession. We …first show that compositional shifts in demographics, occupation, industry, region, and the reason for unemployment jointly account for very little of the observed increase in LTU…” Link

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Technical Change and the Relative Demand for Skilled Labor

Technical Change and the Relative Demand for Skilled Labor. Lawrence Katz, 2014, Book Chapter. “Skill-biased technical change has been a pervasive feature of the twentieth-century American economy Goldin and Katz 2008). At the ground level. technical change is frequently embodied in new capital goods, whose price relative to output or labor becomes cheaper over time. As the relative price of capital declines, more capital per worker is used, and capital “deepening” occurs. In the twentieth century, physical capital and skill have been shown to be relative complements so that capital deepening has increased the demand for skilled relative to…” Link

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America’s Job Challenges and the Continuing Role of the U.S. Department of Labor

America’s Job Challenges and the Continuing Role of the U.S. Department of Labor. Lawrence Katz, March 2013, Paper. “The Great Recession and its aftermath has been a particularly trying period for American workers and their families. Employment collapsed in 2008-9 in the wake of the financial crisis with the unemployment rate more than doubling from 2007 to 2009 and peaking at 10.0 percent in October 2009. Four years into an economic recovery, the unemployment rate remains abnormally high and long-term joblessness a major problem. The employment crisis has exacerbated longer-term U.S. labor market trends of rising…”  Link verified March 28, 2014

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For-Profit Colleges

For-Profit Colleges. David Deming, Claudia Goldin, Lawrence Katz, Spring 2013, Paper. “For-profit, or proprietary, colleges are the fastest-growing postsecondary schools in the nation, enrolling a disproportionately high share of disadvantaged and minority students and those ill-prepared for college. Because these schools, many of them big national chains, derive most of their revenue from taxpayer-funded student financial aid, they are of interest to policy makers not only for the role they play in the higher education spectrum but also for the value they provide their students…” Link Verified October 13, 2014

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Achieving Escape Velocity: Neighborhood and School Interventions to Reduce Persistent Inequality

Achieving Escape Velocity: Neighborhood and School Interventions to Reduce Persistent Inequality. Roland Fryer, Lawrence Katz, 2013, Paper. “This paper reviews the evidence on the efficacy of neighborhood and school interventions in improving the long-run outcomes of children growing up in poor families. We focus on studies exploiting exogenous sources of variation in neighborhoods and schools and which examine at least medium-term outcomes. Higher-quality neighborhoods improve family safety, adult subjective well-being and health, and girls’ mental health. But they have no detectable impact on youth human…”  Link

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Long-Term Neighborhood Effects on Low-Income Families: Evidence from Moving to Opportunity

Long-Term Neighborhood Effects on Low-Income Families: Evidence from Moving to Opportunity. Lawrence Katz, Ronald C. Kessler, 2013, Paper. “We examine long-term neighborhood effects on low-income families using data from the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) randomized housing-mobility experiment. This experiment offered to some public-housing families but not to others the chance to move to less-disadvantaged neighborhoods. We show that ten to 15 years after baseline, MTO: (i) improves adult physical and mental health; (ii) has no detectable effect on economic outcomes or youth schooling or physical health; and (iii) has…”  Link verified March 28, 2014

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Technical Change and the Relative Demand for Skilled Labor: The United States in Historical Perspective

Technical Change and the Relative Demand for Skilled Labor: The United States in Historical Perspective. Lawrence Katz, January 2013, Paper. “This paper examines long-term shifts in the relative demand for skilled labor in the United States. Although de-skilling in the conventional sense did occur overall in nineteenth century manufacturing, a more nuanced picture is that occupations “hollowed out”: the share of “middle-skill” jobs – artisans – declined while those of “high-skill” – white collar, non-production workers – and “low-skill” – operatives and laborers increased…” Link Verified October 13, 2014

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