Found 7 article(s) for author 'Law'

Rule of Law and Female Entrepreneurship

Rule of Law and Female Entrepreneurship. Edward Glaeser, October 2019, Paper, “Commerce requires trust, but trust is difficult when one group consistently fears expropriation by another. If men have a comparative advantage at violence and there is little rule-of-law, then unequal bargaining power can lead women to segregate into low-return industries and avoid entrepreneurship altogether. In this paper, we present a model of female entrepreneurship and rule of law that predicts that women will only start businesses when they have both formal legal protection and informal bargaining power. The model’s predictions are supported both in cross-national data and with a new census of Zambian manufacturers. In Zambia, female entrepreneurs collaborate less, learn less from fellow entrepreneurs, earn less and segregate into industries with more women, but gender differences are ameliorated when women have access to adjudicating institutions, such as Lusaka’s “Market Chiefs” who are empowered to adjudicate small commercial disputes. We experimentally induce variation in local institutional quality in an adapted trust game, and find that this also reduces the gender gap in trust and economic activity.Link

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The Law, Corporate Governance, and Economic Justice

The Law, Corporate Governance, and Economic Justice. Mark Roe, September 26, 2019, Paper, “The Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme Court begins by invoking the New Deal, and expressing admiration for the way its goals and some of its social programs have been put into practice by Northern European social democracies. Most important are their protections for workers and the unemployed—protections the Judge finds deplorably absent in U.S. law and corporate labor practices. Nevertheless, when contemplating how corporate boards in the U.S. might respond to the growing demand for U.S. public companies to address social problems like the environment and economic inequality, the Delaware judge falls back on the prescription of Adolph Berle, who, though one of the framers of the New Deal, insisted that companies “stick to their knitting” by putting shareholders first as the only way of ensuring the accountability of corporate managements and boards.Link

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Harvard Professor Cass Sunstein explains how social change happens

Harvard Professor Cass Sunstein explains how social change happens. Cass Sunstein, April 14, 2019, Audio, “Brian talks to Cass Sunstein, the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Sunstein served in the Obama administration as the Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs from 2009 to 2012. In his conversation with Brian, he discusses his new book, “How Change Happens,” which answers the question of how social change happens and how change is impacted by social norms.Link

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Things Invisible To See: State Action & Private Property

Things Invisible To See: State Action & Private Property. Joseph William Singer, June 2018, Paper, “This Article revisits the state action doctrine, a judicial invention that shields “private” or “non-governmental” discrimination from constitutional scrutiny. Traditionally, this doctrine has applied to discrimination even in places of public accommodation, like restaurants, hotels, and grocery stores. Born of overt racial discrimination, the doctrine has inflicted substantial injustice throughout its inglorious history, and courts have continuously struggled in vain to coherently apply the doctrine.Link

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Irreparability as Irreversibility

Irreparability as Irreversibility. Cass Sunstein, 2018, Paper, “Some things, people say, are “gone forever.” But what exactly does that mean? Some losses are irreparable in the sense that nothing can be done to restore the status quo ante – or if something can be done, it is not enough (or perhaps outsiders can never know if it is). The Irreversible Harm Precautionary Principle takes the form of an insistence on paying a premium to freeze the status quo and to maintain flexibility for the future, while new information is acquired. In many settings, it makes sense to pay for an option to avoid a risk of irreversible losses. An implicit understanding of option value can be found in the emphasis on irreversibility in National Environmental Policy Act and other federal statutes, along with many international agreements.” Link

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Symposium: Science Challenges for Law and Policy: Serviceable Truths: Science for Action in Law and Policy

Symposium: Science Challenges for Law and Policy: Serviceable Truths: Science for Action in Law and Policy. Sheila Jasanoff, June 2015, Paper. “As the articles in this symposium issue attest, the relationship between law and science has begun to attract attention as an autonomous field of study, generating its own bodies of expertise and specialized scholarship. It is less obvious how the perspectives arising from within the community of legal practitioners and thinkers relate to a largely separate, but parallel, body of research and understanding from Science and Technology Studies (STS)…Link

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Law and the Economy of Early America: Markets, Institutions of Exchange, and Labor

Law and the Economy of Early America: Markets, Institutions of Exchange, and Labor. Christine A. Desan, 2013, Book Chapter. “This chapter contains sections titled: Progress Narratives and Their Radical Critique in Law, Consumption and Commodity Studies, Institutions of Exchange, The Ambiguous Place of Labor…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 11, 2014

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