Found 5 article(s) for author 'labor market'

Racialized Re-entry: Labor Market Inequality After Incarceration

Racialized Re-entry: Labor Market Inequality After Incarceration. Bruce Western, October 1, 2018, Paper, “Why do some people succeed in the labor market after incarceration but others do not? We study the transition from prison to work with data on monthly employment and earnings for a sample of men and women observed for a year after incarceration. More than in earlier research, the data provide detailed measurement of temporary and informal employment and richly describe the labor market disadvantages of formerly incarcerated men and women. We find that half the sample is jobless in any given month and average earnings are well below the poverty level.Link

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Innovation Policy and the Economy

Innovation Policy and the Economy (Volume 18). Josh Lerner, 2018, Book, “This volume is the eighteenth annual volume of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Innovation Policy and the Economy (IPE) group. The IPE group provides an accessible forum to bring the work of leading academic researchers to an audience of policymakers and those interested in the interaction between…Link

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Fairness at Equilibrium in the Labor Market

Fairness at Equilibrium in the Labor Market. Yiling Chen, July 5, 2017, Paper, “Recent literature on computational notions of fairness has been broadly divided into two distinct camps, supporting interventions that address either individual-based or group-based fairness. Rather than privilege a single definition, we seek to resolve both within the particular domain of employment discrimination. To this end, we construct a dual labor market model composed of a Temporary Labor Market, in which €rm strategies are constrained to ensure group-level fairness, and a Permanent Labor Market, in which individual worker fairness is guaranteed.Link

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Housing and Employment Insecurity among the Working Poor

Housing and Employment Insecurity among the Working Poor. Matthew Desmond, February 2016, Paper. “While social scientists have documented severe consequences of job loss, scant research investigates why workers lose their jobs. We explore the role of housing insecurity in actuating employment insecurity, investigating if workers who involuntarily lose their homes subsequently involuntarily lose their jobs. Analyzing novel survey data of predominately low-income working renters, we find the likelihood of being laid off to be between 11 and 22 percentage points higher for workers who experienced a preceding forced move, compared to observationally identical workers who did not. Our findings suggest that initiatives promoting housing stability could promote employment stability.Link

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Do concerns about labor market competition shape attitudes toward immigration? New evidence

Do concerns about labor market competition shape attitudes toward immigration? New evidence. Michael Hiscox, December 2011, Paper, “Are concerns about labor market competition a powerful source of anti-immigrant sentiment? Several prominent studies have examined survey data on voters and concluded that fears about the negative effects of immigration on wages and employment play a major role generating anti-immigrant attitudes. We examine new data from a targeted survey of U.S. employees in 12 different industries. In contrast with previous studies, the findings indicate that fears about labor market competition do not appear to have substantial effects on attitudes toward immigration, and preferences with regard to immigration policy, among this large and diverse set of voters.Link

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