Found 60 article(s) for author 'Labor'

The Good Jobs Challenge

The Good Jobs Challenge. Dani Rodrik, February 7, 2019, Opinion, “Every economy in the world today is divided between an advanced segment, typically globally integrated, employing a minority of the labor force, and a low-productivity segment that absorbs the bulk of the workforce, often at low wages and under poor conditions. How should policymakers address this dualism?Link

Tags: , , , ,

From Dollars to Sense: Placing a Monetary Value on Non-Cash Compensation Encourages Employees to Value Time over Money

From Dollars to Sense: Placing a Monetary Value on Non-Cash Compensation Encourages Employees to Value Time over Money.  Ashley Whillans, 2019, Paper, “When deciding where to work, employees may focus too much on salary and not enough on non cash benefits such as paid time-off, potentially undermining their long-term happiness. We propose a simple solution to encourage employees to recognize the value of non-cash benefits: list the financial value of non-cash compensation. Results from one archival data set (n = 42,271) and eight studies (n = 3,190) provide evidence for these ideas. First, as expected, employees who receive non-cash compensation are happier than employees who do not. Yet, prospective employees underestimate the happiness benefit of non-cash benefits. Second, and most critically, prospective employees are more likely to choose jobs with greater non-cash benefits and lower salaries when the cash value of these non-cash benefits are listed.Link

Tags: , , , , ,

The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: The Role of Race

The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: The Role of Race. George Borjas, January 30, 2019, Paper, “The author’s 2017 reappraisal of the impact of the Mariel supply shock revealed that the wage of low-skill workers declined in post-Mariel Miami. Clemens and Hunt (2019) assert that a data quirk in the March CPS—specifically, a substantial increase in the black share of Miami’s low-skill workforce in the period—implies that those wage trends do not correctly measure the impact of the Marielitos. Because blacks earn less than whites earn, the increased black share would spuriously reduce the average low-skill wage in Miami. The author examines the sensitivity of the evidence to the change in the racial composition of the sample. The Clemens and Hunt assertion is demonstrably false. The timing of the post-Mariel decline in Miami’s wage does not coincide with the increase in the black share. And sensible adjustments for racial composition do not change the finding that Miami’s low-skill wage fell after 1980.Link

Tags: , , , , ,

From Immigrants to Robots: The Changing Locus of Substitutes for Workers

From Immigrants to Robots: The Changing Locus of Substitutes for Workers. George Borjas, Richard Freeman, January 2019, Paper, “Increased use of robots has roused concern about how robots and other new technologies change the world of work. Using numbers of robots shipped to primarily manufacturing industries as a supply shock to an industry labor market, we estimate that an additional robot reduces employment and wages in an industry by roughly as much as an additional 2 to 3 workers and by 3 to 4 workers in particular groups, which far exceed estimated effects of an additional immigrant on employment and wages. While the growth of robots in the 1996-2016 period of our data was too modest to be a major determinant of wages and employment, the estimated coefficients suggest that continued exponential growth of robots could disrupt job markets in the foreseeable future and thus merit attention from labor analysts.Link

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Slavery Incentive

The Slavery Incentive. Ricardo Hausmann, August 31, 2018, Opinion, “By restricting the workers’ outside options, employers may get them to accept terms that freer individuals would reject. That may be a reason why there is so little urgency in solving the problem of undocumented immigrants in the US, and why many countries protect citizens differently than foreigners.Link

Tags: , , , , ,

Stickiness on digital labour platforms and ethnic networks

Stickiness on digital labour platforms and ethnic networks. William Kerr, Christopher Stanton, August 27, 2018, Opinion, “Online labour platforms such as Upwork facilitate interactions between employers and employees for a wide range of tasks. This column provides some first evidence on flows and substitution across countries on these new digital platforms. In contrast to classic trade patterns in products, contract placements via Upwork are frequently cross-border and North-South in nature. The findings also suggest that employers leave the platform in response to wage bid increases rather than substituting away from their target search location. Diaspora networks, in particular the Indian diaspora, still matter for how contracts are placed at the global level.Link

Tags: , , , ,

Why a Universal Basic Income Is Better Than Subsidies of Low-Wage Work

Why a Universal Basic Income Is Better Than Subsidies of Low-Wage Work. Maximilian Kasy, August 5, 2018, Paper, “In this paper, we compare subsidies of low-wage work, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), to unconditional cash transfers—or what is commonly referred to as a universal basic income (UBI).2 The EITC helps families with low earnings but does not provide any support to those without earnings. It is an extremely popular policy because it redistributes income to low-earning families while encouraging work. In contrast, a UBI provides unconditional support to everyone and is often combined with a progressive tax on earnings.Link

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The real reason you’re not getting a pay raise

The real reason you’re not getting a pay raise. Jason Furman, July 31, 2018, Opinion, “Wages are growing much more slowly than the last time we had sustained low unemployment rates, the late 1990s. This is the notorious “wage puzzle,” a topic that has been the subject of much speculation by everyone from Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell to pretty much every economist I follow on Twitter.Link

Tags: , , , , ,