Found 223 article(s) for author 'Jobs and Unemployment'

Stephen Greenblatt on the future of jobs, economic mobility, and decision making in Shakespeare

Stephen Greenblatt on the future of jobs, economic mobility, and decision making in Shakespeare January 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Stephen Greenblatt, Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard, legendary Shakespearean scholar, and Pulitzer Prize winner, on the future of jobs, economic mobility, and decision making in Shakespeare. | Click here for more interviews like […]

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Innovation Policy and the Economy

Innovation Policy and the Economy (Volume 18). Josh Lerner, 2018, Book, “This volume is the eighteenth annual volume of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Innovation Policy and the Economy (IPE) group. The IPE group provides an accessible forum to bring the work of leading academic researchers to an audience of policymakers and those interested in the interaction between…Link

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Lessons from Immigration Economics

Lessons from Immigration Economics. George Borjas, Winter 2018, Paper, “The article offers information on the things to be learnt from the immigration economics. Topics discussed include West Germany and European countries recruited and imported hundreds of guest workers from Turkey; book “Exodus: How Migration Is Changing Our World” by Paul Collier addresses question in development economics never directly worked on immigration issues in his academic work.; and researches ignoring the implication of the decisions potential immigrants.Link

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Evidence: What the U.S. Research Shows about Worker Ownership

Evidence: What the U.S. Research Shows about Worker Ownership. Richard Freeman, 2017, Paper, “The Oxford Handbook of Mutual, Co-operative, and Co-Owned Business investigates all types of ‘member owned’ organizations, whether consumer co-operatives, agricultural and producer co-operatives, worker co-operatives, mutual building societies, friendly societies, credit unions, solidarity organizations, mutual insurance companies, or employee-owned companies. Such organizations can be owned by their consumers, the producers, or the employees – whether through single-stakeholder or multi-stakeholder ownership. This complex set of organizations is named differently across countries: from ‘mutual’ in the UK, to ‘solidarity cooperatives’ in Latin America.Link

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Borrowing to Save? The Impact of Automatic Enrollment on Debt

Borrowing to Save? The Impact of Automatic Enrollment on Debt. John Beshears, David Laibson, Brigitte Madrian, December 6, 2017, Paper, “How much of the retirement savings induced by automatic enrollment is offset by increased borrowing outside the retirement savings plan? We study a natural experiment created when the U.S. Army began automatically enrolling its newly hired civilian employees into the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) at a default contribution rate of 3% of income. Four years after hire, automatic enrollment causes no significant change in debt excluding auto loans and first mortgages (point estimate = 0.9% of income, 95% confidence interval = [-0.9%, 2.7%]). Automatic enrollment does significantly increase auto loan balances by 2.0% of income and first mortgage balances by 7.4% of income.Link

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A Short-term Intervention for Long-term Fairness in the Labor Market

A Short-term Intervention for Long-term Fairness in the Labor Market. Lily Hu, Yiling Chen, November 30, 2017, Paper, “The persistence of racial inequality in the U.S. labor market against a general backdrop of formal equality of opportunity is a troubling phenomenon that has significant ramifications on the design of hiring policies. In this paper, we show that current group disparate outcomes may be immovable even when hiring decisions are bound by an input-output notion of “individual fairness.” Instead, we construct a dynamic reputational model of the labor market that illustrates the reinforcing nature of asymmetric outcomes resulting from groups’ divergent access to resources and as a result, investment choices…Link

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The Elusive Promise of Structural Reform

The Elusive Promise of Structural Reform. Dani Rodrik, November 28, 2017, Book Chapter, “This Chapter reconsiders the notion of and rationale for ‘structural reforms.’ Structural reforms are changes in labor and product markets as well as wider institutional changes that aim to increase the efficiency with which labor and capital are allocated in the economy, ensuring that these resources go where their contribution to national income is largest. If successful, such changes promote productivity, investment, and growth. Structural reforms are often part of the conditionality accompanying financial assistance, and the assistance offered to Greece since 2010 is no exception…Link

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Productivity and Pay: is the link broken?

Productivity and Pay: is the link broken? Lawrence Summers, November 2017, Paper, “After growing in tandem for nearly 30 years after the second world war, since 1973 an increasing gap has opened between the compensation of the average American worker and her/his average labor productivity. Brynjolffson and McAfee (2014) use the phrase “the great decoupling” to describe this phenomenon; Bivens and Mishel (2015) refer to it as a “historic divergence”. In recent years discussion has centered on understanding why this phenomenon has occurred and how policy should respond.Link

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The Rise of In-and-Outs: Declining Labor Force Participation of Prime Age Men

The Rise of In-and-Outs: Declining Labor Force Participation of Prime Age Men. John Coglianese, November 15, 2017, Paper, “This paper documents that much of the decline in labor force participation of U.S. prime age men comes from “in-and-outs”—who I define as men who temporarily leave the labor force. Individuals moving in and out of the labor force have been an understudied margin of labor supply but account for roughly one third of the decline in participation between 1977 and 2015. Most in-and-outs take an occasional short break in between jobs but are otherwise attached to the labor force. Examining explanations for the rise of in-and-outs, I find that half of the rise has come from married or cohabiting men, and I show that this portion of the increase can be explained by a wealth effect from their partners’ growing earnings, using variation in the growth of female wages across demographic groups.Link

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Recent US Manufacturing Employment: The Exception that Proves the Rule

Recent US Manufacturing Employment: The Exception that Proves the Rule. Robert Lawrence, November 2017, Paper, “This Working Paper challenges two widely held views: first that trade performance has been the primary reason for the declining share of manufacturing employment in the United States, and second that recent productivity growth in manufacturing has actually been quite rapid but is not accurately measured. The paper shows that for many decades, faster productivity growth interacting with unresponsive demand has been the dominant force behind the declining share of employment in manufacturing in the United States and other industrial economies. It also shows that since 2010, however, the relationship has been reversed and slower productivity growth in manufacturing has been associated with more robust performance in manufacturing employment.” Link

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