Found 9 article(s) for author 'Jobs and Employment'

Ed Glaeser on the Future of Employment, Inequality, Poverty, and Joblessness in America

Ed Glaeser on the Future of Employment, Inequality, Poverty, and Joblessness in America July 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Ed Glaeser, the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University, on the future of employment, inequality, poverty, and joblessness in America. | Click here for more interviews like this one. Links: Ed Glaeser’s […]

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Jonathan Zittrain on Information Privacy, the Future of Jobs, and the Changing Role of Technology Companies

Jonathan Zittrain on Information Privacy, the Future of Jobs, and the Changing Role of Technology Companies June 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Jonathan Zittrain, the George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and Harvard Kennedy School, Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Director of the […]

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Shane Greenstein on Jobs, Inequality, Financial Crises, and the Future of the Internet

Shane Greenstein on Jobs, Inequality, Financial Crises, and the Future of the Internet May 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Shane Greenstein, the Martin Marshall Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School and co-chair of the Harvard Business School Digital Initiative, on jobs, inequality, financial crises, and the future of the Internet. | Click […]

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Does Productivity Still Determine Worker Compensation? Domestic and International Evidence

Does Productivity Still Determine Worker Compensation? Domestic and International Evidence. Robert Lawrence, 2016, Book Chapter. “The American dream is that each generation should live twice as well as the previous one, and this requires that incomes rise at an annual rate of around 2 percent per year. At this pace, incomes will double every 35 years. Between 1947 and 1970, average real compensation in the US increased at annual rate of 2.6 percent—a pace that was actually faster than required to achieve the dream. But since 1970, the average real compensation of US workers has grown at less than 1 percent per year, and at that pace it would take almost a lifetime to see incomes double.Link

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Home-Based Workers and Cities

Home-Based Workers and Cities. Martha Chen, 2016, Paper. “This paper explores the impact of local government policies and urban plans on home-based workers. It presents recent national data on the size and composition of home-based work in developing countries as well as findings from two recent field studies of urban home-based workers in several Asian cities/countries. The research findings highlight that homes often double as workplaces, especially for women workers, and that slums are domains of significant economic activities. Reflecting these twin facts, as well as the demands of home-based workers, the paper makes the case that city governments and urban planners need to integrate home-based workers and their livelihood activities into local economic development plans. It also argues that city governments need to extend basic infrastructure to the homes-cum-workplaces of home-based workers, as well as transport services to the settlements where they live and work. The paper provides some promising examples of where and how this has been done, largely in response to effective advocacy by organizations of home-based workers.Link

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Paying Up for Fair Pay: Consumers Prefer Firms with Lower CEO-to-Worker Pay Ratios

Paying Up for Fair Pay: Consumers Prefer Firms with Lower CEO-to-Worker Pay Ratios. Rohit Deshpandé, Michael I. Norton, 2015, Paper. “Prior research examining consumer expectations of equity and price fairness has not addressed wage fairness, as measured by a firm’s pay ratio. Pending legislation will require American public companies to disclose the pay ratio of CEO wage to the average employee’s wage. Our six studies show that pay ratio disclosure affects purchase intention of consumers via perceptions of wage fairness. The disclosure of a retailer’s high pay ratio (e.g., 1000 to 1) reduces purchase intention relative…Link

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Lawrence Summers on the Interplay Between Government and Business

Lawrence Summers on the Interplay Between Government and Business. Lawrence Summers, April 3, 2013, Audio . “Harvard University President Emeritus Lawrence Summers, a former US Treasury Secretary and economic advisor to President Obama, discusses structural problems with the US economy that have been exposed by the recession, how government and business must work together to spur growth, the need for regulations to eliminate the causes of the recession and his outlook on the continuing economic recovery…..” Link 

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DAMS

DAMS. Rohini Pande, October 2007, Paper: “This paper studies the productivity and distributional effects of large irrigation dams in India. Our instrumental variable estimates exploit the fact that river gradient affects a district’s suit- ability for dams. In districts located downstream from a dam, agricultural production increases, and vulnerability to rainfall shocks declines. In contrast, agricultural production shows an in- significant increase in the district where the dam is located but its volatility increases. Rural poverty declines in downstream districts but increases in the district where the dam is built, suggesting that neither markets nor state institutions have alleviated the adverse distributional impacts of dam construction.” Link

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