Found 9 article(s) for author 'Jeffrey Liebman'

Independent Taxation, Horizontal Equity, and Return-Free Filing

Independent Taxation, Horizontal Equity, and Return-Free Filing. Jeffrey Liebman, 2019, Book Chapter, “Switching from joint to independent taxation of spouses in married couples would reduce marginal tax rates on secondary earners, make the tax system marriage neutral, and facilitate return-free filing through exact withholding. This switch would, however, abandon the perspective that total household income is the best measure of ability to pay. This paper investigates the vertical and horizontal equity implications of a switch from joint to independent taxation of the sort that might occur in conjunction with adoption of return-free filing.Link

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Using Data to More Rapidly Address Difficult U.S. Social Problems

Using Data to More Rapidly Address Difficult U.S. Social Problems. Jeffrey Liebman, December 21, 2017, Paper, “This article argues that the evidence-based-policy movement needs to supplement its current emphasis on program evaluations with an approach that uses data at a much higher frequency to improve the administration and impact of government-funded social service programs. Doing so offers the best chance of making significant progress in ameliorating challenging social problems. I describe how an idealized government social service agency could use data and data analysis to improve its results, review the barriers that prevent agencies from operating in this way, and outline how targeted resources and technical assistance can help to overcome these barriers.Link

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The Perception of Social Security Incentives for Labor Supply and Retirement: The Median Voter Knows More Than You’d Think

The Perception of Social Security Incentives for Labor Supply and Retirement: The Median Voter Knows More Than You’d Think. Jeffrey Liebman, October 2, 2013, Paper. “The degree to which the Social Security tax distorts labor supply depends on the extent to which individuals perceive the link between current earnings and future Social Security benefits. Some Social Security reform plans have been motivated by an assumption that workers fail to perceive this link and that increasing the salience of the link could result in significant efficiency gains. To measure the perceived linkage between labor supply and Social…” Link

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Do Expiring Budgets Lead to Wasteful Year-End Spending? Evidence from Federal Procurement.

Do Expiring Budgets Lead to Wasteful Year-End Spending? Evidence from Federal Procurement. Jeffrey Liebman, October 2013, Paper. “Many organizations have budgets that expire at the end of the fiscal year. Faced with uncertainty over future spending demands, these organizations have an incentive to build up a rainy day fund over the first part of the year. If demand does not materialize, they must rush to spend these resources on low quality projects at the end of the year. We test these predictions using data on procurement spending by the U.S. federal government…” Link verified June 19, 2014

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Advancing Evidence-Based Policymaking to Solve Social Problems

Advancing Evidence-Based Policymaking to Solve Social Problems. Jeffrey Liebman, Fall 2013, Paper. “Despite spending billions and billions of dollars each year, the United States is simply not making rapid enough progress in addressing a range of social problems. Many children are poorly prepared to start or advance in school. Many prisoners end up back in jail after being released. Many new and displaced workers lack skills to succeed in the workplace. Many people suffer from chronic illnesses such as diabetes and asthma. In the face of these and other social problems, the nation has either failed to develop effective solutions…” May require purchase or user account.  Link

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The Deterioration in the US Fiscal Outlook, 2001-2010

The Deterioration in the US Fiscal Outlook, 2001-2010. Jeffrey Liebman, October 2013, Paper. “From 1999 to 2001, US budget surpluses averaged 2% of GDP. By 2011, the Congressional Budget Office was projecting persistent ‘current policy’ budget deficits exceeding 6% of GDP, even after the economy recovered from the recession. This paper reviews the remarkable deterioration in the US fiscal outlook. It shows that more than half of the deterioration occurred before the 2007-9 recession, as a combination of tax cuts, increased spending, and worse than expected economic performance…” May require user account or purchase. Link

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The Decline, Rebound, and Further Rise in SNAP Enrollment: Disentangling Business Cycle Fluctuations and Policy Changes

The Decline, Rebound, and Further Rise in SNAP Enrollment: Disentangling Business Cycle Fluctuations and Policy Changes. Peter Ganong, Jeffrey Liebman, August 2013, Paper. “Approximately 1-in-7 people and 1-in-4 children received benefits from the US Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in July 2011, both all-time highs. We analyze changes in SNAP takeup over the past two decades. From 1994 to 2001, coincident with welfare reform, take-up fell from 75% to 54% of eligible people. The take-up rate then rebounded, and, following several policy changes to improve program access, stabilized at 69% in…” Link

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Simple Humans, Complex Insurance, Subtle Subsidies

Simple Humans, Complex Insurance, Subtle Subsidies. Jeffrey Liebman, Richard Zeckhauser, September 2008, Paper. “The behavioral revolution in economics has demonstrated that human beings often have difficulty making wise choices. The most widely chronicled difficulties arise for decisions made under conditions of uncertainty, those whose consequences unfold over significant amounts of time, and decisions made in complex environments. Unfortunately, these are precisely the elements involved when individuals choose a health insurance policy, or decide whether to consume health care services. In this paper, we argue that…” Link

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What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment?

What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment? Lawrence Katz, Jeffrey Liebman, Ronald Kessler, July 2008, Paper. “Experimental estimates from Moving to Opportunity (MTO) show no significant impacts of moves to lower-poverty neighborhoods on adult economic self-sufficiency four to seven years after random assignment. The authors disagree with Clampet-Lundquist and Massey’s claim that MTO was a weak intervention and therefore uninformative about neighborhood effects. MTO produced large changes in neighborhood environments that improved adult…” Link

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