Found 20 article(s) for author 'Jason Furman'

Trump Is Losing the Trade War With China

Trump Is Losing the Trade War With China. Jason Furman, August 19, 2019, Opinion, “President Trump’s China strategy is failing. His tougher approach has yielded no meaningful Chinese concessions but is increasingly damaging the U.S. economy. Today China is more integrated with the rest of the world while the U.S. is more isolated. To combat China’s unfair, statist economic practices effectively, the U.S. must change its approach, enlisting allies and international institutions to advance a more focused set of demands.Link

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Further Thinking on the Costs and Benefits of Deficits

Further Thinking on the Costs and Benefits of Deficits. Jason Furman, Lawrence Summers, April 22, 2019, Opinion, “In recent months the debate over the future of fiscal policy has intensified. For example, Olivier Blanchard, in his presidential address to the American Economic Association this year, highlighted the implications of the empirical fact of sustained low real interest rates for fiscal policy, and others have debated the purported changes in the nature of economic theory itself—most notably modern monetary theory (MMT). In January we made our own contribution to the fiscal policy debate in Foreign Affairs. We offer here our current perspectives on a number of issues that have emerged as most salient in the months of discussion since then.Link

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Unlocking digital competition, Report of the Digital Competition Expert Panel

Unlocking digital competition, Report of the Digital Competition Expert Panel. Jason Furman, March 2019, Paper, “This is the final report of the Digital Competition Expert Panel. Appointed by the Chancellor in 2018, and chaired by former Chief Economist to President Obama, Professor Jason Furman, the Panel makes recommendations for changes to the UK’s competition framework that are needed to face the economic challenges posed by digital markets, in the UK and internationally. Their report recommends updating the rules governing merger and antitrust enforcement, as well as proposing a bold set of pro-competition measures to open up digital markets.Link

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Economic Strategy for Higher Wages and Expanded Labor Participation

Economic Strategy for Higher Wages and Expanded Labor Participation. Jason Furman, Martin Feldstein, 2019, Paper, “We propose two alternative policy options for promoting increased earnings and employment of low-income households: expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) among childless workers, and implementing a wage subsidy for low-income workers that would be administered through employers. The EITC is based on household income and administered as a tax credit, while the subsidy based on hourly wages would require no filing or administrative effort by workers. We compare and contrast the costs and benefits of these two approaches to raising wages. Our two policy options are meant as part of a response to the sluggish income growth at the bottom of the distribution over the past several decades.Link

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Who’s Afraid of Budget Deficits?

Who’s Afraid of Budget Deficits? Jason Furman, Lawrence Summers, January 27, 2019, Opinion, “The United States’ annual budget deficit is set to reach nearly $1 trillion this year, more than four percent of GDP and up from $585 billion in 2016. As a result of the continuing shortfall, over the next decade, the national debt—the total amount owed by the U.S. government—is projected to balloon from its current level of 78 percent of GDP to 105 percent of GDP. Such huge amounts of debt are unprecedented for the United States during a time of economic prosperity.Link

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The Trump Tax Cuts Boosted Growth and Jobs, but at What Cost?

The Trump Tax Cuts Boosted Growth and Jobs, but at What Cost? Jason Furman, December 18, 2018, Opinion, “It has been nearly a year since President Trump signed sweeping tax changes into law. The macroeconomic data already rule out some of the more extravagant claims about immediate jumps in wages and capital. But the more serious debate over the tax cuts’ long-run impact is still far from decided. Here’s what we do know..Link

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The Case for Pausing the Interest-Rate Climb

The Case for Pausing the Interest-Rate Climb. Jason Furman, November 27, 2018, Opinion, “The Federal Reserve has done an outstanding job fulfilling its dual mandate of maximum employment and price stability. To keep the economy in this happy Goldilocks position, the Fed should hold off on raising rates at its December meeting and consider incoming data before deciding when—or even whether—to resume tightening.Link

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Responding to the Global Financial Crisis, What We Did and Why We Did It

Responding to the Global Financial Crisis, What We Did and Why We Did It – The Fiscal Response to the Great Recession: Steps Taken, Paths Rejected, and Lessons for Next Time. Jason Furman, September 11, 2018, Paper, “The fiscal response to the Great Recession started when President Bush signed the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 on February 13, 2008 and finished when the payroll tax cut enacted under President Obama expired at the end of 2012. Congress enacted at least 18 different laws that explicitly included discretionary fiscal stimulus totaling over $1.5 trillion during those five years, with about half of that coming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act signed into law by Obama on February 17th 2009.2LInk

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The Fed Should Raise Rates, but Not the Ones You’re Thinking

The Fed Should Raise Rates, but Not the Ones You’re Thinking. Jason Furman, August 20, 2018, Opinion, “The Federal Reserve has kept rates too low for too long. I’m not referring to interest rates. It’s high time for the Fed to raise countercyclical capital-buffer rates, which govern the amount of extra equity and cash banks are supposed to hold in good times. Increasing the capital buffer would reduce the risk of financial instability, set a precedent for sound macroeconomic management, and build up a bigger cushion for the next downturn.Link

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