Found 8 article(s) for author 'Jason Beckfield'

Rising inequality is not balanced by intergenerational mobility

Rising inequality is not balanced by intergenerational mobility. Jason Beckfield, January 7, 2020, Opinion, “The United States currently exhibits more economic inequality than any peer nation, and surveys of US adults support the idea that inequality is acceptable if it is balanced by mobility. Many are untroubled if doctors make 10 or 20 times what janitors make, as long as janitors’ sons have opportunities to become doctors. In an era of rising income and wealth inequality in the United States since the 1970s, that balance of inequality and mobility grows in salience. Enter Song et al.’s paper, “Long-term decline in intergenerational mobility in the United States since the 1850s” (1), which uses linked household and population records on the occupations of generations of US-born white men, along with data from several representative surveys, to describe how social mobility in the United States has changed since before the Civil War and before industrialization transformed economic production. Comparing the occupations of sons to the occupations of their fathers, Song et al. (1) paint a troubling picture of rising intergenerational persistence in occupational status. One’s social class of origin—the class one is born into—has become “stickier” since 1850. That is, sons’ occupations are increasingly predictable from fathers’ occupations. The headline finding is that sons born after 1940—the Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials of today—are significantly less likely to surpass their fathers in occupational attainment. Fewer janitors’ sons are becoming doctors today.Link

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Unequal Europe: Regional Integration and the Rise of European Inequality

Unequal Europe: Regional Integration and the Rise of European Inequality. Jason Beckfield, 2019, Book, “Argues that European integration causes the convergence and retrenchment of European welfare states. Shows that regional integration has important effects on European welfare states and income inequality in Europe over and above those of globalization. Develops the concept of “technocratic capitalism” as an interpretation of a predominant form of capitalism in the EU over the last thirty years.Link

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Understanding the micro and macro politics of health: Inequalities, intersectionality & institutions – A research agenda

Understanding the micro and macro politics of health: Inequalities, intersectionality & institutions – A research agenda. Jason Beckfield, January 25, 2018, Paper, “This essay brings together intersectionality and institutional approaches to health inequalities, suggesting an integrative analytical framework that accounts for the complexity of the intertwined influence of both individual social positioning and institutional stratification on health. This essay therefore advances the emerging scholarship on the relevance of intersectionality to health inequalities research. We argue that intersectionality provides a strong analytical tool for an integrated understanding of health inequalities beyond the purely socioeconomic by addressing the multiple layers of privilege and disadvantage, including race, migration and ethnicity, gender and sexuality.Link

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How Social Policy Contributes to the Distribution of Population Health: The Case of Gender Health Equity

How Social Policy Contributes to the Distribution of Population Health: The Case of Gender Health Equity. Jason Beckfield, July 4, 2017, Paper, “In this study we aimed to analyze gender health equity as a case of how social policy contributes to population health. We analyzed three sets of social-investment policies implemented in Europe and previously hypothesized to reduce gender inequity in labor market outcomes: childcare; active labor market programs; and long-term care. Methods: We use 12 indicators of social-investment policies from the OECD Social Expenditure Database, the OECD Family Database, and the Social Policy Indicators’ Parental Leave Benefit Dataset.Link

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The Rise of Economic Insecurity in the EU: Concepts and Measures

The Rise of Economic Insecurity in the EU: Concepts and Measures. Jason Beckfield, 2017, Paper, “Economic instability, an array of social changes, and welfare state retrenchment place the question of economic insecurity high on the scholarly and political agenda. We contribute to thesedebates by drawing conceptual distinctions between inequality and insecurity. Fundamentally,inequality concerns the distribution of resources across individuals, while insecurity concerns exposure to multiple social risks that can deteriorate living conditions. The multiplicity and dynamism of insecurity inform our development of a new measure of economic insecurity, using longitudinal data from the EU-SILC database. Substantively, we then use our new measure to analyze the distribution of insecurity in Europe.Link

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Job Security Provisions and Work Hours

Job Security Provisions and Work Hours. Jason Beckfield, 2016, Paper, “This study explores the impact of job security provisions on workplace absence and overtime work. We hypothesize that job security provisions give individuals bargaining power to resolve work hour conflicts in their favour, but they may also create incentives for shirking. To examine the impact of job security provisions empirically, we implement a quasi-experimental research design based on a British job security provisions reform that extended dismissal protection among low-tenure workers.Link

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Rising inequality is not balanced by intergenerational mobility

Rising inequality is not balanced by intergenerational mobility. Jason Beckfield, November 22, 2019, Opinion, “The United States currently exhibits more economic inequality than any peer nation, and surveys of US adults support the idea that inequality is acceptable if it is balanced by mobility. Many are untroubled if doctors make 10 or 20 times what janitors make, as long as janitors’ sons have opportunities to become doctors. In an era of rising income and wealth inequality in the United States since the 1970s, that balance of inequality and mobility grows in salience. Enter Song et al.’s paper, “Long-term decline in intergenerational mobility in the United States since the 1850s” (1), which uses linked household and population records on the occupations of generations of US-born white men, along with data from several representative surveys, to describe how social mobility in the United States has changed since before the Civil War and before industrialization transformed economic production. Comparing the occupations of sons to the occupations of their fathers, Song et al. (1) paint a troubling picture of rising intergenerational persistence in occupational status. One’s social class of origin—the class one is born into—has become “stickier” since 1850. That is, sons’ occupations are increasingly predictable from fathers’ occupations. The headline finding is that sons born after 1940—the Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials of today—are significantly less likely to surpass their fathers in occupational attainment. Fewer janitors’ sons are becoming doctors today.Link

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