Found 3 article(s) for author 'J. Mark Ramseyer'

Rethinking the Regulation of Employment Discharge: The Design of a Monetary Resolution System

Rethinking the Regulation of Employment Discharge: The Design of a Monetary Resolution System. J. Mark Ramseyer, July 4, 2019, Paper, “Should a firm try to discharge an employee, Japanese judges swat it hard. They have been swatting firms hard since the early 1950s. Before the war, most workers and firms had used at-will contracts, and judges had enforced them: workers could quit when they wanted, and firms could discharge them when they wanted. After the war, the Supreme Command for the Allied Powers (SCAP) freed the socialists and communists from prison, and both groups quickly started unionizing the work force. When firms now tried to discharge workers, the unions struck. They could strike violently: When the national railway tried to slash its work force, someone ran an unmanned train into…” Link

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Identity Politics and Organized Crime in Japan: The Effect of Special Subsidies for Burakumin Communities

Identity Politics and Organized Crime in Japan: The Effect of Special Subsidies for Burakumin Communities. J. Mark Ramseyer, August 23, 2016, Paper, “In 1969 the Japanese government launched a subsidy program (the SMA) targeted at the traditional outcastes known as the burakumin. The subsidies attracted the organized crime syndicates, who diverted funds for private gain. Newly enriched, they shifted large numbers of young burakumin men away from legal business and intensified the tendency many Japanese already had to equate the burakumin with the mob. Although the resulting community centers and public housing improved burakumin infrastructure, they also lowered the cost to the public of identifying burakumin neighborhoods. We explore the effects of the termination of the program in 2002 by integrating 30 years of modern municipality data with a 1936 census of burakumin.Link

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The Fable of Land Reform: Leases and Credit Markets in Occupied Japan

The Fable of Land Reform: Leases and Credit Markets in Occupied Japan, J. Mark Ramseyer, October 25, 2012, Paper. “Development officials and scholars routinely argue that land reform can raise productivity. It may not always do so, they write, but it can — and during 1947-50 in Japan it did. Land reform may sometimes raise productivity, but it did not raise it in Japan. The claim that it did is a fable, a tale people tell and re-tell only because they wish it were true. A lease is a credit transaction — a way for local elites (tied to local information networks in ways that banks can never be) to extend funds to farmers…” Link

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