Found 16 article(s) for author 'International Trade'

Jeffrey Frankel Says More…

Jeffrey Frankel Says More... Jeffrey Frankel, September 2019, Opinion, “Welcome to Say More, a weekly newsletter that brings Project Syndicate’s renowned contributors closer to readers. Each issue invites a selected contributor to expand on topics covered in their commentaries, address new ones, and share recommendations, offering readers exclusive insights into the ideas, interests, and personalities of the world’s leading thinkers. This week, Project Syndicate catches up with Jeffrey Frankel, Professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.Link

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Can anything hold back China’s economy?

Can anything hold back China’s economy? Lawrence Summers, December 3, 2018, Opinion, “Presidents Trump and Xi Jinping reached an agreement over the weekend at the Group of 20 meeting in Argentina on a framework for trade dialogue that will delay the imposition of new U.S. tariffs. While surely better than the alternative, this step does not address any of the fundamental tensions in the economic relationship between the United States and China.Link

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Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal

Trump’s Goal With China Is Big Tariffs, Not A Deal. Robert Lawrence, August 15, 2018, Audio, “Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment at the Harvard Kennedy School and former economic advisor to Clinton, on the deal that Trump really wants with China. Hosted by Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz.Link

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Globalization and Inequality

Globalization and Inequality. Elhanan Helpman, 2018, Book, “Globalization is not the primary cause of rising inequality. This may come as a surprise. Inequality within nations has risen steadily in recent decades, at a time when countries around the world have eased restrictions on the movement of goods, capital, and labor. Many assume a causal relationship, which has motivated opposition to policies that promote freer trade. Elhanan Helpman shows, however, in this timely study that this assumption about the effects of globalization is more myth than fact.Link

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Productive Ecosystems and the Arrow of Development

Productive Ecosystems and the Arrow of Development. Ricardo Hausmann, 2018, Paper, “Economic growth is often associated with diversification of economic activities. Making a product in a country is dependent on having, and acquiring, the capabilities needed to make the product, making the process path-dependent. We derive a probabilistic model to describe the directed dynamic process of capability accumulation and product diversification of countries. Using international trade data, the model enables us to empirically identify the set of pre-existing products that enables a product to be exported competitively. We refer to this set as the ecosystem of the product. We construct a directed network of products, the Eco Space, where the edge weight is an estimate of capability overlap. Analysis of this network enables us to identify transition products and a core-periphery structure.Link

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US-China Trade Frictions and the Global Trading System

US-China Trade Frictions and the Global Trading System. Robert Lawrence, 2018, Book Chapter, “Recent trade frictions between the United States and China have violated several rules and practices of the rules-based multilateral trading system established under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and its successor, the World Trade Organization (WTO). President Donald Trump’s preoccupation with trade balances in goods, both bilateral and total, has led to protectionist trade policies at home— primarily to minimize imports and offshoring by US firms—and aggressive demands for more market opening abroad. President Trump appears to view trade not as an activity from which all nations can gain but rather as a zero-sum game in which some win and some lose.Link

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An Economic Rationale for the West African Scramble? The Commercial Transition and the Commodity Price Boom of 1835-1885

An Economic Rationale for the West African Scramble? The Commercial Transition and the Commodity Price Boom of 1835-1885. Jeffrey Williamson, March 2018, Paper, “We use a new trade dataset showing that nineteenth century Sub-Saharan Africa experienced a terms of trade boom comparable to other parts of the ‘global periphery’. A sharp rise in export prices in the five decades before the scramble (1835-1885) was followed by an equally impressive decline during the colonial era. This study revises the view that the scramble for West Africa occurred when its major export markets were in decline and argues that the larger weight of West Africa in French imperial trade strengthened the rationale for French instead of British initiative in the conquest of the interior.Link

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Understanding the Political Economy of the Eurozone Crisis: A Political Scientist’s Guide

Understanding the political economy of the Eurozone crisis: A Political Scientist’s Guide. Jeffry Frieden, 2017, Paper, “The Eurozone crisis constitutes a grave challenge to European integration. This essay presents an overview of the causes of the crisis, and analyzes why has it been so difficult to resolve. It focuses on how responses to the crisis were shaped by distributive conflicts both among and within countries. On the international level, debtor and creditor countries have fought over the distribution of responsibility for the accumulated debt; countries with current account surpluses and deficits have fought over who should implement the policies necessary to reduce the current account imbalances.Link

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Globalization and Wage Inequality

Globalization and Wage Inequality. Elhanan Helpman, December 9, 2016, Paper, “Globalization has been blamed for rising inequality in rich and poor countries. Yet the views of many protagonists in this debate are not based on evidence. To help form an evidence-based opinion, I review in this paper the theoretical and empirical literature on the relationship between globalization and wage inequality. While the initial analysis that started in the early 1990s focused on a particular mechanism that links trade to wages, subsequent studies have considered several other channels, and the quantitative assessment of the size of these influences has been carried out in multiple studies. Building on this research, I conclude that trade played an appreciable role in increasing wage inequality, but that its cumulative effect has been modest, and that globalization does not explain the preponderance of the rise in wage inequality within countries.Link

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