Found 375 article(s) for author 'Innovation'

Social entrepreneurship as field encroachment: how a neoliberal social movement constructed a new field

Social entrepreneurship as field encroachment: how a neoliberal social movement constructed a new field. Tamara Kay, Marshall Ganz, May 18, 2019, Paper, “In explaining the emergence of new strategic action fields, in which social movements’ and organizations’ logic, rules and strategies are forged, inter-field dynamics remain under-explored. The case of Social Enterprise and Entrepreneurship (SEE) shows how new fields can emerge through field encroachment, whereby shifts among overlapping fields create structural opportunities for the ascendency of new fields, which may adapt logics borrowed from adjacent fields to construct legitimacy. SEE leveraged the 1980s’ shift between first-order market and state fields to encroach on the political strategies of community organizing, birthing a neoliberal social movement to create a new field addressing social problems using market-based, profit-motivated approaches. With its borrowed veneer of justice, SEE rapidly developed a high academic and public profile over just three decades, despite little evidence its approach to solving social problems works. In encroaching on proven political strategies for solving social problems, it may further undermine democratic practices.Link

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The Case For Breaking Up Big Tech

The Case For Breaking Up Big Tech. Nancy Koehn, May 15, 2015, Audio, “Calls to break up big tech companies like Facebook and Amazon are getting louder. After Sen. Elizabeth Warren called for Facebook, Google and Amazon to be designated as “platform utilities” and broken apart from their own services that compete on those platforms in March, other Democratic candidates for president have ratcheted up their own rhetoric on the issue. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes himself has called the social network a monopoly that should be forced to shed Instagram and Whatsapp, two major recent acquisitions. Harvard Business School historian Nancy Koehn joined the conversation on Boston Public Radio Wednesday, delving into the history of antitrust law in America, and ultimately agreeing with those calling for breaking up big tech.Link

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Innovation + Disruption Symposium

Innovation + Disruption Symposium. Clayton Christensen, May 2019, Video, “On May 5 in New York City, Colgate University will host Innovation + Disruption, a symposium about technology, the liberal arts, and preparing graduates for the future.  Clayton Christensen, Kim B. Clark professor of business administration at the Harvard Business School and co-founder of the innovation consulting firm Innosight, will tee up the event with a keynote address titled The Innovative University.Link

 

 

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Why investors seem skeptical about the ride-hailing business

Why investors seem skeptical about the ride-hailing business. Mihir Desai, May 10, 2019, Audio, “Uber had its much-anticipated initial public offering Friday — despite losing $1.8 billion over the last 12 months, which makes it the all-time biggest money-losing IPO. The results were less than spectacular: Uber priced its shares toward the low end of estimates at $45 a share. They opened at $42 and closed at $41.55.Link

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The Spatial Mismatch Between Innovation and Joblessness

The Spatial Mismatch Between Innovation and Joblessness. Edward Glaeser, April 9, 2019, Paper, “American technological creativity is geographically concentrated in areas that are generally distant from the country’s most persistent pockets of joblessness. Should innovation policy attempt to engender more innovation is distressed areas? The primarily inventive parts of innovation policy, such as N.I.H. grants, can aid underperforming areas, possibly through health improvements that reduce the share of people on Disability Insurance, without any spatial reallocation. Moreover, since research funding is presumably already designed to maximize knowledge production, spatial reallocation may come at a considerable cost. The educational aspects of innovation policy, such as Pell Grants, work-study and Federal overhead reimbursement on grants, can reflect regional realities better and do more to encourage employment in distressed areas. Lifting the cap on H1B visas in poorer places can also enhance local human capital. Finally, there is particular scope for geographically targeted entrepreneurship policy, such as eliminating the barriers to new business formation near universities and in distressed places. Spatially targeted employment subsidies can also encourage more labor-intensive innovation in depressed areas.Link

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Innovation, competition and sectoral evolution: an introduction to the special section on Industrial Dynamics

Innovation, competition and sectoral evolution: an introduction to the special section on Industrial Dynamics. Gary Pisano, March 29, 2019, Paper, “This paper is the introduction to the ICC special section on Industrial Dynamics. Industrial dynamics has a venerable heritage in economics and after a long dormant period, it has witnessed a major resurgence beginning in the early 1980s. The current Special Section takes stock of the progress along this new and rich intellectual journey. This Introduction does not aim to present a review of the accomplishments reached in the last period. Rather, it reflects on the broad themes characterizing our progress in understanding industry evolution and industrial dynamics.Link

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What’s Really Driving Disruption (It’s Not Technology)

What’s Really Driving Disruption (It’s Not Technology). Thales Teixeira, March 28, 2019, Audio, “The emergence of a new technology is often cited as what drives the disruption of an industry or business. But that’s not true in most cases, according to Harvard Business School professor Thales Teixeira. Instead, startups disrupt established companies by decoupling the customer value chain — picking one aspect of the business and doing it better than the incumbent.Link

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The Art of Governing Through Questions

The Art of Governing Through Questions. Jorrit de Jong, Jack Goldsmith, March 25, 2019, Opinion, “When citizens ask mayors questions, they expect answers. Elected officials, in turn, want to be seen as strong leaders who are quick with solutions. Mayors are also tasked with putting out fires, both figuratively and literally, that directly affect the lives of their citizens.Link

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