Found 618 article(s) for author 'Inequality'

Economic Strategy for Higher Wages and Expanded Labor Participation

Economic Strategy for Higher Wages and Expanded Labor Participation. Jason Furman, Martin Feldstein, 2019, Paper, “We propose two alternative policy options for promoting increased earnings and employment of low-income households: expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) among childless workers, and implementing a wage subsidy for low-income workers that would be administered through employers. The EITC is based on household income and administered as a tax credit, while the subsidy based on hourly wages would require no filing or administrative effort by workers. We compare and contrast the costs and benefits of these two approaches to raising wages. Our two policy options are meant as part of a response to the sluggish income growth at the bottom of the distribution over the past several decades.Link

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The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: The Role of Race

The Wage Impact of the Marielitos: The Role of Race. George Borjas, January 30, 2019, Paper, “The author’s 2017 reappraisal of the impact of the Mariel supply shock revealed that the wage of low-skill workers declined in post-Mariel Miami. Clemens and Hunt (2019) assert that a data quirk in the March CPS—specifically, a substantial increase in the black share of Miami’s low-skill workforce in the period—implies that those wage trends do not correctly measure the impact of the Marielitos. Because blacks earn less than whites earn, the increased black share would spuriously reduce the average low-skill wage in Miami. The author examines the sensitivity of the evidence to the change in the racial composition of the sample. The Clemens and Hunt assertion is demonstrably false. The timing of the post-Mariel decline in Miami’s wage does not coincide with the increase in the black share. And sensible adjustments for racial composition do not change the finding that Miami’s low-skill wage fell after 1980.Link

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The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty

The Prosperity Paradox: How Innovation Can Lift Nations Out of Poverty. Clayton Christensen, January 15, 2019, Book, “Clayton M. Christensen, the author of such business classics as The Innovator’s Dilemma and the New York Times bestseller How Will You Measure Your Life, and co-authors Efosa Ojomo and Karen Dillon reveal why so many investments in economic development fail to generate sustainable prosperity, and offers a groundbreaking solution for true and lasting change.Link

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Why Do Americans Prefer Workplace Equality Over Equality At Home?

Why Do Americans Prefer Workplace Equality Over Equality At Home? Nancy Koehn, December 12, 2018, Audio, “A new study set to be published in the journal Gender and Society found that there is a gap in Americans’ ideology around gender roles at the workplace and at home. About a quarter of the people surveyed from 1977 to 2016 believe that while women should have the same opportunities in the workplace, they should still be doing the majority of the home and child care, according to a New York Times article about the study.Link

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Sugar and slaves: Wealth, poverty, and inequality in colonial Jamaica

Sugar and slaves: Wealth, poverty, and inequality in colonial Jamaica. Jeffrey Williamson, December 6, 2018, Paper, “Jamaica was considered to be exceptionally rich in the 18th century. Modern historians have tended to perpetuate this idea. This column uses novel methods to shed new light on living standards and inequality in colonial Jamaica. While the country was one of the most expensive places on the planet at the time, this wealth rested in the hands a very small white, slave-owning elite. The rest of the populace, many in slavery, lived at the very edge of subsistence.Link

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Building a Nonprofit Marketplace to Feed America

Building a Nonprofit Marketplace to Feed America. Scott Duke Kominers, November 20, 2018, Audio, “Feeding America is the third largest nonprofit in the United States, managing a network of more than 200 food banks nationwide. Harvard Business School professor Scott Duke Kominers and Chicago Booth School of Business professor Canice Prendergast discuss how the organization designed a marketplace that was efficient and fair for all participants.Link

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Reclaiming Community

Reclaiming Community. Dani Rodrik, November 9, 2018, Opinion, “Stable families, good jobs, strong schools, abundant and safe public spaces, and pride in local cultures and history – these are the essential elements of prosperous societies. Neither global markets nor the nation-state can adequately supply them, and sometimes markets and states undermine them.Link

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