Found 527 article(s) for author 'Inequality'

Stephen Greenblatt on the future of jobs, economic mobility, and decision making in Shakespeare

Stephen Greenblatt on the future of jobs, economic mobility, and decision making in Shakespeare January 2018. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Stephen Greenblatt, Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard, legendary Shakespearean scholar, and Pulitzer Prize winner, on the future of jobs, economic mobility, and decision making in Shakespeare. | Click here for more interviews like […]

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Inclusive Growth: Profitable Strategies for Tackling Poverty and Inequality

Inclusive Growth: Profitable Strategies for Tackling Poverty and Inequality. Robert Kaplan, George Serafeim, January 2018, Paper, “More than a billion people in the developing world remain in extreme poverty and outside the formal economy. Traditional CSR programs have done little to alleviate the situation and rarely produce transformative change. Instead of trying to fix local problems, the authors argue, corporations need to reimagine the regional ecosystems in which they participate. They should search for systemic, multisector opportunities; mobilize complementary partners; and obtain seed and scale-up financing from organizations with a mission to alleviate poverty.Link

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Does Trade Fuel Inequality?

Does Trade Fuel Inequality? Jeffrey Frankel, January 2, 2018, Opinion, “To explain the rise in inequality that began in the 1980s and has accelerated since the turn of the century, many have pointed out that indicators of globalization, such as the trade-to-GDP ratio, have also been rising rapidly over the same period. But does that correlation imply a causal link between trade and inequality?Link

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Using Data to More Rapidly Address Difficult U.S. Social Problems

Using Data to More Rapidly Address Difficult U.S. Social Problems. Jeffrey Liebman, December 21, 2017, Paper, “This article argues that the evidence-based-policy movement needs to supplement its current emphasis on program evaluations with an approach that uses data at a much higher frequency to improve the administration and impact of government-funded social service programs. Doing so offers the best chance of making significant progress in ameliorating challenging social problems. I describe how an idealized government social service agency could use data and data analysis to improve its results, review the barriers that prevent agencies from operating in this way, and outline how targeted resources and technical assistance can help to overcome these barriers.Link

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A Short-term Intervention for Long-term Fairness in the Labor Market

A Short-term Intervention for Long-term Fairness in the Labor Market. Lily Hu, Yiling Chen, November 30, 2017, Paper, “The persistence of racial inequality in the U.S. labor market against a general backdrop of formal equality of opportunity is a troubling phenomenon that has significant ramifications on the design of hiring policies. In this paper, we show that current group disparate outcomes may be immovable even when hiring decisions are bound by an input-output notion of “individual fairness.” Instead, we construct a dynamic reputational model of the labor market that illustrates the reinforcing nature of asymmetric outcomes resulting from groups’ divergent access to resources and as a result, investment choices…Link

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How to Win the Battle of the Sexes Over Pay (Hint: It Isn’t Simple.)

How to Win the Battle of the Sexes Over Pay (Hint: It Isn’t Simple.). Claudia Goldin, November 10, 2017, Opinion, “When Billie Jean King won the United States Open singles tennis title in 1972, her reward was a meager $10,000. Ilie Năstase, her male counterpart, won $25,000. Ms. King fought hard for equal rights and, on the tennis court, she won. By 1973, men and women received the same prizes at the Open. That still can’t be said of all tennis tournaments, but despite some ill-natured male grousing recently, equal pay is still the rule at the United States Open, at least.Link

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Thailand in a Larger Universe: The Lingering Consequences of Crypto-Colonialism

Thailand in a Larger Universe: The Lingering Consequences of Crypto-Colonialism. Michael Herzfeld, November 2, 2017, Paper, “The present parochialism of Thai studies, although partial, suggests parallels with the situation of Modern Greek studies in the early 1970s. The cultural and political conditions attendant on both in the respective time periods—especially the prudery, emphasis on bourgeois notions of respectability, and restrictions on the scope and content of scholarship—suggest that a comparative framework, already emergent, would benefit both Thailand and Thai studies today. Thailand and Greece both represent conditions of “crypto-colonialism,” in which the combination of adulation and resentment of powerful Western nations produces a distinctive set of attitudes.Link

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Deals and Development – The Political Dynamics of Growth Episodes

Deals and Development: The Political Dynamics of Growth Episodes. Lant Pritchett, 2017, Book, “Provides a novel framework for understanding how growth episodes emerge and when growth is maintained for a sustained period. Draws on country specific examples to ground theory in practice. Explains actionable methods of intervention to improve a country’s chance at achieving transformative economic growth. Uses a clear layout and unified approach to help the reader find the information they need. An open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence.Link

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Assessing the Distribution of Impacts in  Global Benefit‐Cost Analysis 

Assessing the Distribution of Impacts in Global Benefit‐Cost Analysis. Lisa A. Robinson, James K. Hammitt, October 2017, Paper, “There is widespread agreement that benefit‐cost analyses should be supplemented with information on how the impacts are distributed across individuals with different characterics (such as income) . Yet reviews of completed analyses suggest that such information is rarely provided. The goal of this paper is therefore relatively simple: to encourage analysts to provide information on the distribution of net benefits throughout the population in addition to assessing the overall impacts of the policy.Link

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Efficient Welfare Weights

Efficient Welfare Weights. Nathaniel Hendren, October 2017, Paper, “How should we measure economic efficiency? The canonical measure is an unweighted sum of willingnesses to pay. In contrast, this paper provides efficient welfare weights that implement the Kaldor-Hicks tests for efficiency but account for the distortionary cost of taxation. The shape of the income distribution yields bounds on these weights that suggest it is efficient to weight surplus to the poor more than to the rich. Point estimates suggest surplus to the poor should be weighted 1.5-2x more than surplus to the rich. I illustrate how to use these weights to evaluate the efficiency of government policy changes.” Link

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