Found 8 article(s) for author 'Income Distribution'

Rising inequality is not balanced by intergenerational mobility

Rising inequality is not balanced by intergenerational mobility. Jason Beckfield, January 7, 2020, Opinion, “The United States currently exhibits more economic inequality than any peer nation, and surveys of US adults support the idea that inequality is acceptable if it is balanced by mobility. Many are untroubled if doctors make 10 or 20 times what janitors make, as long as janitors’ sons have opportunities to become doctors. In an era of rising income and wealth inequality in the United States since the 1970s, that balance of inequality and mobility grows in salience. Enter Song et al.’s paper, “Long-term decline in intergenerational mobility in the United States since the 1850s” (1), which uses linked household and population records on the occupations of generations of US-born white men, along with data from several representative surveys, to describe how social mobility in the United States has changed since before the Civil War and before industrialization transformed economic production. Comparing the occupations of sons to the occupations of their fathers, Song et al. (1) paint a troubling picture of rising intergenerational persistence in occupational status. One’s social class of origin—the class one is born into—has become “stickier” since 1850. That is, sons’ occupations are increasingly predictable from fathers’ occupations. The headline finding is that sons born after 1940—the Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials of today—are significantly less likely to surpass their fathers in occupational attainment. Fewer janitors’ sons are becoming doctors today.Link

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Productivity and Pay: Is the Link Broken?

Productivity and Pay: Is the Link Broken? Lawrence Summers, June 2018, Paper, “Since 1973 median compensation in the United States has diverged starkly from average labor productivity. Since 2000, average compensation has also begun to diverge from labor productivity. These divergences lead to the question: Holding all else equal, to what extent does productivity growth translate into compensation growth for typical American workers? We investigate this, regressing median, average, and  production/nonsupervisory compensation growth on productivity growth in various specifications. We find substantial evidence of linkage between productivity and compensation…Link

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Reckoning with Inequality

Reckoning with Inequality. Jeffrey Frankel, March 22, 2016, Opinion. “When it comes to the rise in economic inequality since the 1970s in the United States and some other advanced economies, it doesn’t really matter which measure of income distribution we choose: They all show the increase. And, while many competing explanations have been proposed, we do not need to agree about causes to concur on sensible policies to address the problem.Link

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Growth, Trade, and Inequality

Growth, Trade, and Inequality. Elhanan Helpman, May 4, 2014, Paper. “We introduce firm and worker heterogeneity into a model of innovation-driven endogenous growth. Individuals who differ in ability sort into either a research sector or a manufacturing sector that produces differentiated goods…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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The impact of changing family structures on the income distribution among Costa Rican women 1993-2009

The impact of changing family structures on the income distribution among Costa Rican women 1993-2009. Maximilian Kasy, July 31, 2013, Paper. “Changes in family structures, such as the composition of households with respect to size, age and gender, can have an impact on poverty rates and the income distribution more generally. We analyze the impact of changing family structures on the income distribution among adult Costa Rican women between 1993 and 2009, using decomposition methods. There was a general increase in the share of family structures associated with lower incomes (singles with dependents) until 2001. After…”  Link verified March 28, 2014

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The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth

The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth. Dani Rodrik, Paper, June 2013. “Developing countries will face stronger headwinds in the decades ahead, both because the global economy is likely to be significantly less buoyant than in recent decades and because technological changes are rendering manufacturing more capital and skill intensive. Desirable policies will continue to share features that have served successful countries well in the past, but growth strategies will differ in their emphasis. Ultimately, growth will depend primarily on what happens at home. The challenge is therefore to design an architecture…” Link

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The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth

The Past, Present, and Future of Economic Growth. Dani Rodrik, June 2013, Paper. “Developing countries will face stronger headwinds in the decades ahead, both because the global economy is likely to be significantly less buoyant than in recent decades and because technological changes are rendering manufacturing more capital and skill intensive. Desirable policies will continue to share features that have served successful countries well in the past, but growth strategies will differ in their emphasis. Ultimately, growth will depend primarily on what happens at home…” Link

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Do Rising Top Incomes Lift All Boats?

Do Rising Top Incomes Lift All Boats? Daniel Andrews, Christopher Jencks, Andrew Leigh. June 15, 2009, Paper. “Pooling data for 1905 to 2000, we find no systematic relationship between top income shares and economic growth in a panel of 12 developed nations observed for between 22 and 85 years. After 1960, however, a one percentage point rise in the top decile’s income share is associated with a statistically significant 0.12 point rise in GDP growth during the following year…” Link

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