Found 6 article(s) for author 'Ichiro Kawachi'

The Measurement of Bridging Social Capital in Population Health Research

The Measurement of Bridging Social Capital in Population Health Research. Ichiro Kawachi, November 1, 2015, Paper. “Social capital is defined as the resources available to individuals and groups through membership in social networks. The definition is consistent with either an individualistic approach or a collective approach. Social capital can be further classified according to bonding versus bridging social capital (e.g. relationships between individuals who are homogeneous or heterogeneous with respect to social class, race/ethnicity, or other attributes). We conducted a systematic review via Pubmed, the ISI web of knowledge…” Link

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Diets and Health: How Food Decisions Are Shaped by Biology, Economics, Geography, and Social Interactions

Diets and Health: How Food Decisions Are Shaped by Biology, Economics, Geography, and Social Interactions. Ichiro Kawachi, September 16, 2015, Paper. “Health is shaped by both personal choices and features of the food environment. Food-choice decisions depend on complex interactions between biology and behavior, and are further modulated by the built environment and community structure. That lower-income families have lower-quality diets is well established. Yet, diet quality also varies across small geographic neighborhoods and can be influenced by transportation, retail, and ease of access to healthy…” Link

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Social Mobility and Health in European Countries: Does Welfare Regime Type Matter?

Social Mobility and Health in European Countries: Does Welfare Regime Type Matter? Ichiro Kawachi, August 22, 2015. Paper, “Health inequalities pose an important public health challenge in European countries, for which increased social mobility has been suggested as a cause.We sought to describe how the relationship between health inequalities and social mobility varies among welfare regime types in the European region. Data from six rounds of the European Social Survey was analyzed using multilevel statistical techniques, stratified by welfare regime type, including 237,535 individuals from 136 countries…Link

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Climate change, cash transfers and health

Climate change, cash transfers and health. Ichiro Kawachi, August 2015, Paper, “The forecast consequences of climate change on human health are profound, especially in low- and middle-income countries and among the most disadvantaged populations. Innovative policy tools are needed to address the adverse health effects of climate change. Cash transfers are established policy tools for protecting population health before, during and after climate-related disasters. Researchers propose extending cash transfer interventions to more proactive measures to improve health in the context of climate change. They identify promising cash transfer schemes that could be used to prevent the adverse health consequences of climatic hazards.” Link

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The ‘dark side’ of social capital: trust and self-rated health in European countries

The ‘dark side’ of social capital: trust and self-rated health in European countries. S.V. Subramanian, Ichiro Kawachi, May 27, 2015, Paper. “Generalized interpersonal trust (as an indicator of social capital) has been linked to health status at both the individual and ecological level. We sought to examine how changes in contextual and individual trust are associated with changes in self-rated health in the European Social Surveys 2002–12. Methods: A multilevel analysis using a variance components model was performed on 203 452 individuals nested within 145 country cohorts covering 35 countries. Conditional on...” Link

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Effects of Racial Prejudice on the Health of Communities: A Multilevel Survival Analysis

Effects of Racial Prejudice on the Health of Communities: A Multilevel Survival Analysis. Ichiro Kawachi, May 13, 2015, Paper.“Racism and prejudice negatively affect the health of those targeted. Recent experimental studies suggest that prejudice may also have a negative impact on individuals who harbor prejudicial attitudes. For instance, in one investigation, participants with high levels of racial prejudice experienced increases in the stress hormone cortisol during interactions with members of a different racial group but not interactions with individuals from their same group. In another study on stressful intergroup encounters…” Link

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