Found 13 article(s) for author 'History'

Poverty in America: New Directions and Debates

Poverty in America: New Directions and Debates. Matthew Desmond, Bruce Western, July 2018, Paper, “Reviewing recent research on poverty in the United States, we derive a conceptual framework with three main characteristics. First, poverty is multidimensional, compounding material hardship with human frailty, generational trauma, family and neighborhood violence, and broken institutions. Second, poverty is relational, produced through connections between the truly advantaged and the truly disadvantaged. Third, a component of this conceptual framework is transparently normative, applying empirical research to analyze poverty as a matter of justice, not just economics. Throughout, we discuss conceptual, methodological, and policy-relevant implications of this perspective on the study of extreme disadvantage in America.Link

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New Perspectives on the History of Political Economy

New Perspectives on the History of Political Economy. Sophus Reinert, 2018, Book, “This volume offers a snapshot of the resurgent historiography of political economy in the wake of the ongoing global financial crisis, and suggests fruitful new agendas for research on the political-economic nexus as it has developed in the Western world since the end of the Middle Ages. New Perspectives on the History of Political Economy brings together a select group of young and established scholars from a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds—history, economics, law, and political science—in an effort to begin a re-conceptualization of the origins and history of political economy through a variety of still largely distinct but complementary historical approaches—legal and intellectual, literary and philosophical, political and economic—and from a variety of related perspectives: debt and state finance, tariffs and tax policy, the encouragement and discouragement of trade, merchant communities and companies, smuggling and illicit trades, mercantile and colonial systems, economic cultures, and the history of economic doctrines more narrowly construed.Link

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American Danger: United States Empire, Eurafrica, and the Territorialization of Industrial Capitalism, 1870–1950

American Danger: United States Empire, Eurafrica, and the Territorialization of Industrial Capitalism, 1870–1950. Sven Beckert, October 2017, Paper, “During the last third of the nineteenth century, a debate emerged in a number of European countries on the “American danger.” Responding to the rapid rise of the United States as the world’s most important economy, some European observers feared their nations’ declining competitiveness in the face of the territorial extent of the United States, and its ability to integrate a dynamic industrial sector with ample raw material supplies, agriculture commodities, markets, and labor into one national economy. This “second great divergence” provoked a range of responses, as statesmen, capitalists, and intellectuals advocated for territorial rearrangements of various European economies, a discussion that lasted with greater or lesser intensity from the 1870s to the 1950s.Link

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From Commodity Booms to Economic Miracles: Why Southeast Asian Industry Lagged Behind

From Commodity Booms to Economic Miracles: Why Southeast Asian Industry Lagged Behind. Jeffrey Williamson, May 2015, Paper. “Except for the Philippines between 1896 and 1939, Southeast Asia was never part of the century-long East Asian industrial catching up until after World War II. Before the 1950s, Southeast Asian manufacturing hardly grew at all: while commodity export processing did grow fast, import-competing manufacturing and manufacturing for local consumption did not. Singapore and Thailand started recording catching up growth rates on the western leaders only from the 1950s onwards, and Indonesia and Malaysia joined the club only after 1973…Link

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Making ‘Green Giants’: Environment Sustainability in the German Chemical Industry, 1950s–1980s

Making ‘Green Giants’: Environment Sustainability in the German Chemical Industry, 1950s–1980s. Geoffery G. Jones, April 2014, Paper. “This article examines the evolution of corporate environmentalism in the West German chemical industry between the 1950s and the 1980s. It focuses on two companies, Bayer and Henkel, that have been identified as “green giants,” and traces the evolution of their environmental strategies in response to growing evidence of pollution and resulting political pressures. The variety of capitalism literature has suggested that…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 11, 2014

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Waste, Recycling and Entrepreneurship in Central and Northern Europe, 1870–1940

Waste, Recycling and Entrepreneurship in Central and Northern Europe, 1870–1940. Geoffery G. Jones, March 4, 2014, Paper. “This working paper examines the role of entrepreneurs in the municipal solid waste industry in industrialized central and northern Europe from the late nineteenth century to the 1940s. It explores the emergence of numerous German, Danish, and other European entrepreneurial firms explicitly devoted to making a profitable business out of conserving and returning valuable resources to productive use…” Link Verified October 11, 2014

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Firms and Global Capitalism

Firms and Global Capitalism. Geoffrey G. Jones, March 2014, Book Chapter. “The second volume of The Cambridge History of Capitalism provides an authoritative reference on the spread and impact of capitalism across the world, and the varieties of responses to it. Employing a wide geographical coverage and strong comparative outlook, a team of leading scholars explore the global consequences that capitalism has had for industry, agriculture and trade, along with the reactions by governments, firms and markets…” May require purchase or user account. Link Verified October 11, 2014

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Entrepreneurs, Firms and Global Wealth since 1850

Entrepreneurs, Firms and Global Wealth since 1850. Geoffery G. Jones, March 12, 2013, Paper. “We live today in a world where most people are poor and some are very rich, and the category in which you find yourself is largely determined not by your job, your age or your gender but by your location. Despite the fast economic growth of China and India over the past two decades, most people in the world today are very poor. Nearly 3 billion people live on less than $2 a day; almost 1 billion are illiterate…” Link Verified October 11, 2014

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Does the Law and Finance Hypothesis Pass the Test of History?

Does the Law and Finance Hypothesis Pass the Test of History? Aldo Musacchio, March 6, 2013, Paper. “For the body of work known as the law and finance literature, the development of financial markets and the concentration of ownership across countries is to a large extent the consequence of the legal system nations created or inherited decades or hundreds of years ago. Despite the seemingly historical nature of this explanation, most of the body of work supporting the law and finance hypothesis has been ahistorical…” May require purchase or user account. Link verified June 19, 2014

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