Found 19 article(s) for author 'healthcare'

Who Drives Digital Innovation? Evidence from the U.S. Medical Device Industry

Who Drives Digital Innovation? Evidence from the U.S. Medical Device Industry, Ariel Dora Stern, 2019, Paper, “Does the large-scale technological change that is characteristic of an industry-wide digital transformation entrench industry leaders or enable the rise of new entrants? We offer a novel approach to this question by studying the medical device industry, a unique setting in which we observe all new product commercialization over several years and in which the introduction of software has created fresh opportunities for new product development. Pioneering a new application of text analysis, we consider over 35,000 new medical devices that came to market in the United States from 2002 to 2016 in order to identify digital products. We examine the relative importance of within-firm know-how, geography, and financial resources in predicting digital new product development. We find that prior product-area commercialization experience and location in a region of concentrated expertise reinforce one another as predictors of digital innovation.Link

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Attributing Medical Spending to Conditions: A Comparison of Methods

Attributing Medical Spending to Conditions: A Comparison of Methods. David Cutler, November 2018, Paper, “Partitioning medical spending into conditions is essential to understanding the cost burden of medical care. Two broad strategies have been used to measure disease-specific spending. The first attributes each medical claim to the condition listed as its cause. The second decomposes total spending for a person over a year to the cumulative set of conditions they have. Traditionally, this has been done through regression analysis. This paper makes two contributions. First, we develop a new method to attribute spending to conditions using propensity score models. Second, we compare the claims attribution approach to the regression approach and our propensity score stratification method in a common set of beneficiaries age 65 and over drawn from the 2009 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Our estimates show that the three methods have important differences in spending allocation and that the propensity score model likely offers the best theoretical and empirical combination.Link

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How Does Product Liability Risk Affect Innovation? Evidence from Medical Implants

How Does Product Liability Risk Affect Innovation? Evidence from Medical Implants. Hong Luo, July 2, 2018, Paper, “Liability laws designed to compensate for harms caused by defective products may also affect innovation incentives. This paper examines this issue, exploiting a major quasi-exogenous increase in liability risk faced by US suppliers of polymers used to manufacture medical devices implanted in human bodies. Difference-in-differences analyses suggest that the surge in liability risk had a large and negative impact on downstream innovation in medical implants but no significant effect on upstream polymer patenting. These findings show how tort laws may affect the development of new technologies and how liability risk may percolate through an industry’s vertical chain.Link

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Tyler Cowen and Amitabh Chandra on economics of health care

Tyler Cowen and Amitabh Chandra on economics of health care. Amitabh Chandra, June 12, 2018, Audio, “Two prominent economists share their views on the politics, economics and ethics of health care reform. Tyler Cowen is professor of economics at George Mason University and the Center for the Study of Public Choice and has earned numerous accolades, including being named a Top 100 Global Thinker by Foreign Policy. He is also one of The Economist’s most influential economists of the decade.Link

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The Persistence of Colonial Laws: Why Rwanda is Ready to Remove Outdated Legal Barriers to Health, Human Rights, and Development

The Persistence of Colonial Laws: Why Rwanda is Ready to Remove Outdated Legal Barriers to Health, Human Rights, and Development. Richard Freeman, Agnes Binagwaho, June 10, 2018, Paper, “Rwanda has earned a reputation as a trailblazer among developing nations. Especially in the health sector, it is often the early-adopter of international recommendations and new technologies. Yet at times, Rwanda’s momentum is impeded when it must grapple with a challenge that post-colonial societies commonly face: the persistence of colonial laws. When left in force, these legal vestiges, once designed to oppress and subordinate, can rear their head at unexpected moments, causing delays in policy implementation, uncertainty, or unjust outcomes.Link

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Bloomberg Opinion Radio: Weekend Edition

Bloomberg Opinion Radio: Weekend Edition. Noah Feldman, May 18, 2018, Audio, “Bloomberg Opinion Weekend Edition hosted by June Grasso. Guests: Max Nisen, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “Look in the Mirror for a Reason Drug Prices Are High.” Noah Feldman, Harvard Law School professor and Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “Sports Betting Is a Victory for States’ Rights.” Liam Denning, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “California Puts Solar on the Roof and Up For Grabs.” Joe Nocera, Bloomberg Opinion columnist: “How Tom Wolfe’s Perspective Changed Magazines.” Mary Duenwald, Bloomberg Opinion editor: “Tax Sugar-Sweetened Drinks to Help Fight Obesity.” Link

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Health, Employment, and Disability: Implications from the Undocumented Population

Health, Employment, and Disability: Implications from the Undocumented Population. George Borjas, April 2018, Paper, “Disability benefit recipients in the United States have nearly doubled in the past two decades, growing substantially faster than the population. It is difficult to estimate how much of this increase is explained by changes in population health, as we often lack a valid counterfactual. We propose using undocumented immigrants as the counterfactual, as they cannot currently claim benefits. Using NHIS microdata, we estimate models of disability as a function of medical conditions for both the legal and undocumented populations.Link

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Taxes for health: evidence clears the air

Taxes for health: evidence clears the air. Lawrence Summers, April 5, 2018, Opinion, “Although this argument may look appealing, clear thinking combined with good evidence reveals its many fallacies. An ethical judgment about taxing harmful products cannot rely on the question of tax regressivity alone. Rather, it requires consideration of all the effects, including the associated health…Link

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The Good and Bad News of Health Care Employment

The Good and Bad News of Health Care Employment. David Cutler, February 27, 2018, Paper, “Health care has long been one of the bright spots in the US employment situation. As people have moved out of manufacturing, health care has been a prominent landing place. Just this year, health care passed retail trade to become the largest employer in the economy. Furthermore, health care is a relatively stable industry. Because demand for care remains relatively constant across recessions and expansions, health care employment declines less in recessions than does employment in other industries.Link

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Policy Strategies For Aligning Price And Value For Brand-Name Pharmaceuticals

Policy Strategies For Aligning Price And Value For Brand-Name Pharmaceuticals. Amitabh Chandra, February 16, 2018, Paper, “Systemic factors in the US health care system lead to greater pricing power for drug manufacturers than is the case in other countries. The result is higher prices that are often poorly aligned with the degree of added benefit for patients and the health system. To achieve the difficult balance between necessary incentives for innovation and affordability, many economists favor “value-based” pricing, in which the price for a new drug reflects an assessment of the comparative effectiveness of the drug compared to other available treatments. In this brief we explore the different varieties of value-based pricing, and we outline several measures through which drug competition may be increased, supported by regulatory steps and payment mechanisms to bring drug prices into greater alignment with their underlying clinical value.Link

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