Found 21 article(s) for author 'Hal Scott'

The SEC’s Misguided Attack on Shareholder Arbitration

The SEC’s Misguided Attack on Shareholder Arbitration. Hal Scott, February 22, 2019, Opinion, “Jay Clayton, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, announced earlier this month that the staff of his agency would allow Johnson & Johnson to block its shareholders from voting on an amendment to its own bylaws. I submitted that amendment as trustee of a trust that owns J&J shares.Link

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Dodd-Frank regulations good and bad for financial system, Harvard director says

Dodd-Frank regulations good and bad for financial system, Harvard director says. Hal Scott, September 11, 2018, Video, “Hal Scott, director of the program on International Financial Systems at Harvard Law School, and Sebastian Mallaby, the Paul A. Volcker Senior Fellow for International Economics at the Council on Foreign Relations, discuss what triggered the financial crisis in 2008 and if we are safe from another.Link

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The SEC Plans to Collect Too Much Information

The SEC Plans to Collect Too Much Information. Hal Scott, October 2, 2017, Opinion, “Is your personal information safe from the Securities and Exchange Commission? The SEC has mandated that U.S. stock exchanges and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority establish a database by November 2018 that will store the names, birth dates, Social Security numbers and brokerage accounts of tens of millions of U.S. investors as part of the Consolidated Audit Trail.Link

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The Trump administration—not the Fed—has it right on bank regulation

The Trump administration—not the Fed—has it right on bank regulation. Hal Scott, July 3, 2017, Opinion, “All 34 of the largest banks in the United States, representing over 75 percent of U.S. banking assets, recently passed the Federal Reserve Board’s annual stress tests for the first time since the tests were created in 2011. However, celebration is very premature.Link

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Harvard’s Scott Says U.S. Has Latitude on Bank Reforms

Harvard’s Scott Says U.S. Has Latitude on Bank Reforms. Hal Scott, March 23, 2017, Video, “Hal Scott, Harvard Law School professor and president of Committee on Capital Markets Regulation, discusses the Trump administration’s approach to financial regulation and how it relates to the Federal Reserve and monetary policy. Scott is a potential candidate to be the next Vice Chair of the Federal Reserve. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.”Link

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The Fed’s Stress Tests Need to Be Transparent

The Fed’s Stress Tests Need to Be Transparent. Hal Scott, September 16, 2016, Opinion, “The stress tests that big American banks face each year are about to get more stressful. The Fed is planning to substantially increase—by an average of 57%, we calculate—the regulatory capital that the eight largest banks in the U.S. need to pass the annual tests.  Had these expected higher capital levels been in effect this year, it is likely that the country’s four largest banks ( J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citigroup) all would have failed the test. As a consequence, they would have been barred from remitting more profits to their shareholders.Link

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Bank Stress Tests Won’t Save Us From Financial Crisis

Bank Stress Tests Won’t Save Us From Financial Crisis. Hal Scott, June 23, 2016, Video. “It’s a big week for Wall Street. Minutes before polls close in the U.K. on the Brexit vote Thursday, the Fed is set to release its first round of stress-test results, followed by a second round of results next Wednesday. The tests are used to determine whether or not the largest banks could weather a major crisis, such as Britain leaving the EU, and whether they can boost their dividend payout to shareholders.Link

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Publish the Secret Rules for Banks’ Living Wills

Publish the Secret Rules for Banks’ Living Wills. Hal Scott, June 10, 2016, Opinion. “The Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. recently determined that five of America’s largest banks do not have credible plans to go through bankruptcy without relying on extraordinary government support. If these five firms— J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Bank of New York Mellon and State Street—can’t develop “living wills” that satisfy regulators, then the Dodd-Frank Act authorizes the government to break them up as soon as 2018.Link

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