Found 48 article(s) for author 'Globalization'

Peaceful Coexistence 2.0

Peaceful Coexistence 2.0. Dani Rodrik, April 10, 2019, Opinion, “Today’s Sino-American impasse is rooted in “hyper-globalism,” under which countries must open their economies to foreign companies, regardless of the consequences for their growth strategies or social models. But a global trade regime that cannot accommodate the world’s largest trading economy is a regime in urgent need of repair.Link

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Unequal Europe: Regional Integration and the Rise of European Inequality

Unequal Europe: Regional Integration and the Rise of European Inequality. Jason Beckfield, 2019, Book, “Argues that European integration causes the convergence and retrenchment of European welfare states. Shows that regional integration has important effects on European welfare states and income inequality in Europe over and above those of globalization. Develops the concept of “technocratic capitalism” as an interpretation of a predominant form of capitalism in the EU over the last thirty years.Link

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Labor Market Shocks and the Demand for Trade Protection: Evidence from Online Surveys

Labor Market Shocks and the Demand for Trade Protection: Evidence from Online Surveys. Rafael Di Tella, Dani Rodrik, January 16, 2019, Paper, “We study preferences for government action in response to layoffs resulting from different types of labor-market shocks. We consider the following shocks: technological change, a demand shift, bad management, and three kinds of international outsourcing. Respondents are given a choice among no government action, compensatory transfers, and trade protection. In response to these shocks, support for government intervention generally rises sharply and is heavily biased towards trade protection. Demand for import protection increases significantly in all cases, except for the “bad management” shock. Trade shocks generate more demand for protectionism, and among trade shocks, outsourcing to a developing country elicits greater demand for protectionism than outsourcing to a developed country. The “bad management” shock is the only scenario that induces a desired increase in compensatory transfers; it is also the only case without a significant increase in desired trade protection. Effects appear to be heterogeneous across subgroups with different political preferences and education. In particular, Trump supporters are more protectionist than Clinton supporters. But preferences seem malleable and easy to manipulate: Clinton supporters primed with trade shocks are as protectionist as baseline Trump voters.Link

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Globalization and Inequality

Globalization and Inequality. Elhanan Helpman, 2018, Book, “Globalization is not the primary cause of rising inequality. This may come as a surprise. Inequality within nations has risen steadily in recent decades, at a time when countries around the world have eased restrictions on the movement of goods, capital, and labor. Many assume a causal relationship, which has motivated opposition to policies that promote freer trade. Elhanan Helpman shows, however, in this timely study that this assumption about the effects of globalization is more myth than fact.Link

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Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries

Global Markets and Inequality in African Countries. Eric Maskin, 2018, Paper, “Globalization has had a big impact on many African countries in the last 20 years. It has provided a considerably expanded market for their exports; allowed them to specialize more in products for which they have a comparative advantage; and given their consumers access to an array of goods that they would not otherwise enjoy. In addition, it has led to impressive GDP growth in much of Africa, and has been an important force for improving average prosperity.Link

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Populism, Liberalism, and Democracy

Populism, Liberalism, and Democracy. Michael Sandel, March 13, 2018, Paper, “The right-wing populism ascendant today is a symptom of the failure of progressive politics. Central to this failure is the uncritical embrace of a neo-liberal version of globalization that benefits those at the top but leaves ordinary citizens feeling disempowered. Progressive parties are unlikely to win back public support unless they learn from the populist protest that has displaced them —not by replicating its xenophobia and strident nationalism, but by taking seriously the legitimate grievances with which these ugly sentiments are entangled. These grievances are not only economic but also moral and cultural; they are not only about wages and jobs but also about social esteem.Link

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Max Weber Lecture with Dani Rodrik (Harvard Kennedy School), Fiesole 14 February 2018

Max Weber Lecture with Dani Rodrik (Harvard Kennedy School), Fiesole 14. Dani Rodrik, February 2018, Video, “Dani Rodrik delivered a lecture on ‘Globalisation and the populist backlash’ at the EUI addressing how globalisation has affected the diffusion of populism and the distinctive casues of left-wing and right-wing populism.Link

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Competitive effects of trade: theory and measurement

Competitive effects of trade: theory and measurement. Marc Melitz, February 2018, Paper, “In this paper, I develop a simple model of heterogeneous exporters to a single destination. This model highlights how the response of producer markups to market-level changes in that destination are intrinsically tied to the induced reallocation of export sales to that destination. I discuss how additional assumptions on the shape of demand (originally advocated by Alfred Marshall as his second law of demand) generate specific predictions for the response of those markups and induced product reallocations to increases in market size and competition in a destination: markups fall and market shares are reallocated towards better performing products.Link

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The Trouble With Globalization

The Trouble With Globalization. Dani Rodrik, October 20, 2017, Paper, “Electorates around the world were told not only that globalization was inevitable, but also that it necessarily took the particular form they were witnessing. The nation-state, it was said, was the enemy of globalization, and therefore had to get out of the way. Globalization required ever-stronger global rules mandated by trade agreements, multilateral organizations and international networks of regulators. But not to worry: it would promote economic progress and political harmony, even if not for everyone right away.Link

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Corporate Social Responsibility and the Global Compact

Corporate Social Responsibility and the Global Compact. John Ruggie, 2017, Book Chapter, “Under the leadership of Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the United Nations has played an active role in promoting corporate social responsibility as one means to respond to the challenges of globalisation.’You do not need to wait for governments to pass…Link

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