Found 37 article(s) for author 'Gender'

Why Do Americans Prefer Workplace Equality Over Equality At Home?

Why Do Americans Prefer Workplace Equality Over Equality At Home? Nancy Koehn, December 12, 2018, Audio, “A new study set to be published in the journal Gender and Society found that there is a gap in Americans’ ideology around gender roles at the workplace and at home. About a quarter of the people surveyed from 1977 to 2016 believe that while women should have the same opportunities in the workplace, they should still be doing the majority of the home and child care, according to a New York Times article about the study.Link

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A Tough Call: Understanding barriers to and impacts of women’s mobile phone adoption in India

A Tough Call: Understanding barriers to and impacts of women’s mobile phone adoption in India. Rohini Pande, October 2018, Paper, “Today in India, 67% percent of men own mobile phones, but only 33% percent of women do. South Asian countries in general are clear outliers among countries of similar levels of development, with India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh exhibiting some of the world’s highest gender gaps in access to technology. While the mobile gender gap matters in its own right, it is particularly problematic because it can exacerbate other important forms of inequality — in earnings, networking opportunities, and access to information.Link

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Why Is The Number Of Female CEOs Declining?

Why Is The Number Of Female CEOs Declining? Nancy Koehn, October 3, 2018, Audio, “Earlier this week, California Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill into law making his state the first in the nation to require the boards of publicly traded companies to include women. The moves comes as, nationwide, the number of women in top corporate leadership positions is on the decline. The number of female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies declined by 25 percent this year.Link

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What happens when investments targeting women’s microbusinesses go to men?

What happens when investments targeting women’s microbusinesses go to men? Rohini Pande, May 2, 2018, Paper, “Several studies find that male-operated – but not female-operated – microenterprises benefit from access to grants or loans. But these analyses overlook that female entrepreneurs often reside with a male business owner. Using data from randomized trials in India, Sri Lanka and Ghana, this paper finds that household-level income gains are equivalent regardless of the grant or loan recipient’s gender. Low average returns of female-run enterprises reflects the fact that women’s capital is typically invested into their husband’s enterprise.Link

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This is how companies can close the gender pay gap

This is how companies can close the gender pay gap. Iris Bohnet, April 1, 2018, Paper, “Now that mandatory reporting has revealed that three out of four British public entities and companies pay their male staff more than their female staff, the next question is what employers should do about it. Most organisations want to do something about their gender pay gaps, which in many cases stem from a dearth of women in higher-paying jobs — but many still focus on the wrong actions. Diversity training courses and their newer incarnation of unconscious bias training remain a popular tool, even though there is little evidence that they work. While they can raise awareness, studies show they do little to help change behaviour.Link

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‘Leave the crown in the garage’: The hidden taxes women pay

‘Leave the crown in the garage’: The hidden taxes women pay. Sendhil Mullainathan, March 3, 2018, “The working world is unfair to many women, yet even when they succeed, they must confront another series of challenges. Their hard-won successes are taxed in ways that men’s are not. The taxes I’m talking about aren’t paid in dollars and cents or imposed by the government. They take the form of annoyance and misery and are levied by individuals, very often by loved ones. I call these impositions taxes because they take away some of what an individual earns, diminishing the joys of success.Link

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Male Social Status and Women’s Work

Male Social Status and Women’s Work. Rohini Pande, Charity Troyer Moore, 2018, Paper, “Female labor force participation varies significantly across cultural groups within the same country and among countries with similar levels of economic development (Fernandez and Fogli, 2009). Recent studies have emphasized that cultural values and gender norms – standards describing desirable behavior1 – are important determinants of women’s work (see, for instance, Alesina et al. (2013);..Link

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Women and Work in India: Descriptive Evidence and a Review of Potential Policies

Women and Work in India: Descriptive Evidence and a Review of Potential Policies. Rohini Pande, Charity Troyer Moore, December 30, 2017, Paper, “Sustained high economic growth since the early 1990s has brought significant change to the lives of Indian women, and yet female labor force participation has stagnated at under 30%, and recent labor surveys even suggest some decline since 2005. Using a nationally representative household survey, we lay out five descriptive facts about female labor force participation in India that help identify constraints to higher participation. First, there is significant demand for jobs by women currently not in the labor force. Second, willing female non-workers have difficulty matching to jobs.” Link

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The Rise of In-and-Outs: Declining Labor Force Participation of Prime Age Men

The Rise of In-and-Outs: Declining Labor Force Participation of Prime Age Men. John Coglianese, November 15, 2017, Paper, “This paper documents that much of the decline in labor force participation of U.S. prime age men comes from “in-and-outs”—who I define as men who temporarily leave the labor force. Individuals moving in and out of the labor force have been an understudied margin of labor supply but account for roughly one third of the decline in participation between 1977 and 2015. Most in-and-outs take an occasional short break in between jobs but are otherwise attached to the labor force. Examining explanations for the rise of in-and-outs, I find that half of the rise has come from married or cohabiting men, and I show that this portion of the increase can be explained by a wealth effect from their partners’ growing earnings, using variation in the growth of female wages across demographic groups.Link

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