Found 16 article(s) for author 'Firms'

The Inherent Failures of Long-Term Contracts — and How to Fix Them

The Inherent Failures of Long-Term Contracts — and How to Fix Them. Oliver Hart, September 3, 2019, Audio, “Oliver Hart, Nobel-winning Harvard economist, and Kate Vitasek, faculty at the University of Tennessee, argue that many business contracts are imperfect, no matter how bulletproof you try to make them. Especially in complicated relationships such as outsourcing, one side ends up feeling like they’re getting a bad deal, and it can spiral into a tit for tat battle. Hart and Vitasek argue that companies should instead adopt so-called relational contracts. Their research shows that creating a general playbook built around principles like fairness and reciprocity offers greater benefits to both businesses. Hart and Vitasek, with the Swedish attorney David Frydlinger, cowrote the HBR article “A New Approach to Contracts.”Link

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The Wise Company: How Companies Create Continuous Innovation

The Wise Company: How Companies Create Continuous Innovation. Hirotaka Takeuchi, 2019, Book, “High-velocity change is the fundamental challenge facing companies today. Few companies, however, are prepared to continuously innovate-because they focus on the short-term and do not emphasize the wisdom needed to make sure that their interests are aligned with those of society. Practical wisdom is the bases of continuous innovation, where companies ceaselessly and repeatedly creating new knowledge, disseminating it throughout the organization, and converting knowledge to action over time. In The Wise Company, legendary management experts Ikujiro Nonaka and Hirotaka Takeuchi highlight how various companies have confronted the challenge of rapid change to create new products and new ways of doing business that benefit employees, consumers, and society.Link

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Corporate Purpose and Firm Ownership

Corporate Purpose and Firm Ownership. George Serafeim, August 2019, Paper, “Analyzing data from approximately two million employees in a sample of more than 1,000 established public and private US companies, we find that corporate purpose is lower among employees of public companies. This result is driven by weaker beliefs held by employees in the salaried middle ranks and hourly workers, and not by senior executives. Among public companies, purpose is progressively lower in companies with more concentrated shareholders, suggesting that shareholder power is associated with a lower sense of purpose among employees. A substantial portion of these patterns can be explained by differences in CEO backgrounds and CEO-employee pay gap. Public firms, particularly those with strong shareholders, choose outsider CEOs at a higher rate and pay them more relative to their employees. Altogether, this study finds that the strength of corporate purpose varies substantially across companies, and is related to the identity of the firm owners, and the choices they make.Link

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Varieties of Outward Chinese Capital: Domestic Politics Status and Globalization of Chinese Firms

Varieties of Outward Chinese Capital: Domestic Politics Status and Globalization of Chinese Firms. Meg Rithmire, , Paper, “A great deal of scholarly and popular attention has been devoted the “specter of global China” (Lee 2017). Contemporary China has been interacting with and shaping processes of globalization since it opened its door in 1978, but the more recent spate of attention has focused specifically on Chinese outward investment, which has soared since the early 2000s and especially since the global financial crisis in 2008. Scholars and journalists have sought to understand the extent to which China is “buying the world,” what it means for both the developing world (presumed to be the target) and developed world (presumed to be the competition), and what patterns of investment can illuminate about whether China is “playing our game” (harmonizing with western political and economic institutions) or pursuing a revised world order (Nolan 2013; Steinfeld 2010; Toh 2017).Link

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Economists (and Economics) in Tech Companies

Economists (and Economics) in Tech Companies. Michael Luca, September 11, 2018, Paper, “As technology platforms have created new markets and new ways of acquiring information, economists have come to play an increasingly central role in tech companies – tackling problems such as platform design, strategy, pricing, and policy. Over the past five years, hundreds of PhD economists have accepted positions in the technology sector. In this paper, we explore the skills that PhD economists apply in tech companies, the companies that hire them, the types of problems that economists are currently working on, and the areas of academic research that have emerged in relation to these problems.Link

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Are economic rents good for development? Evidence from the manufacturing sector

Are economic rents good for development? Evidence from the manufacturing sector. Eric Werker, December 2018, Paper, “Are rents, or excess profits, good for development? Rents could induce firms to lobby or bribe governments to preserve the status quo; on the other hand, rents may promote growth by giving firms the needed funds to make investments in fixed capital or research and development. To test this question empirically, we use a panel of manufacturing data at the industry-country-year level, and measure rents by the mark-up ratio. We find that the relationship between rents and growth is strongly negative, with the results being primarily driven by the poorer countries (or those with worse institutions) in the sample.Link

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The Role of Industry, Occupation, and Location-Specific Knowledge in the Survival of New Firms

The Role of Industry, Occupation, and Location-Specific Knowledge in the Survival of New Firms. Edward Glaeser, July 2018, Paper, “How do regions acquire the knowledge they need to diversify their economic activities? How does the migration of workers among firms and industries contribute to the diffusion of that knowledge? Here we measure the industry, occupation, and location specific knowledge carried by workers from one establishment to the next using a dataset summarizing the individual work history for an entire country. We study pioneer firms-firms operating in an industry that was not present in a region-because the success of pioneers is the basic unit of regional economic diversification. We find that the growth and survival of pioneers increase significantly when their first hires are workers with experience in a related industry, and with work experience in the same location, but not with past experience in a related occupation.Link

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Firm Learning and Market Equilibrium

Firm Learning and Market Equilibrium. Ariel Pakes, 2018, Paper, “One goal of the field of industrial organization is to predict the response of markets to environmental or policy changes. A market, for our purposes, is a collection of firms that produce and sell competing products or services. Since the consequence of, say, a price change by a given firm depends on the prices of competing firms, realism requires analyzing these changes in the interacting agent frameworks supplied to us by our game theory colleagues. If a firm had set a profit maximizing price before an environmental change, that price was unlikely to be optimal after, say, a tariff or merger induced a price change by a competitor. It is important to take account of the price adjustments that followed the initial price change.Link

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Knowledge integrators and the survival of manufacturing clusters

Knowledge integrators and the survival of manufacturing clusters. Gary Pisano, June 26, 2018, Paper, “Over the past two decades, the greater prevalence of global supply chains has had contrasting effects on Western manufacturing clusters. While some of them dwindled, others proved resilient. Contributing to the recent literature on co-located clusters and clusters’ linkages, we focus on the impact of lead firms’ strategies on the competitiveness of a pair of ‘twin’ clusters located in Northeast Italy. Our findings suggest that production remains ‘sticky’ when leading firms pursue ‘process-embedded’ innovation by integrating global market and local technical knowledge. We refer to this type of firm as a Knowledge Integrator and discuss how its strategy supports the competitiveness of localized suppliers.Link

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