Found 5 article(s) for author 'exchange rates'

Dollar Invoicing and the Heterogeneity of Exchange Rate Pass-Through

Dollar Invoicing and the Heterogeneity of Exchange Rate Pass-Through. Gita Gopinath, 2019, Paper, “The vast majority of international goods trade is invoiced in a dominant currency, which is most often the U.S. dollar (Goldberg and Tille (2008); Gopinath (2015); Casas et al. (2016); Boz, Gopinath and Plagborg-Møller (2017)). Accordingly, the dominant currency paradigm (DCP) bargained transactions the empirically relevant framework for analyzing trade responses to exchange rate fluctuations and international spillovers of monetary policy. The theoretical framework underlying DCP predicts that pass through from exchange rates to prices or quantities should vary across countries, depending on the share of imports invoiced in dollars.Link

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The Real Exchange Rate, Innovation and Productivity

The Real Exchange Rate, Innovation and Productivity. Laura Alfaro, November 2017, Paper, “We evaluate manufacturing firms’ responses to changes in the real exchange rate (RER) using detailed firm-level data for a large set of countries for the period 2001-2010. We uncover the following stylized facts: In emerging Asia, real depreciations are associated with faster growth of firm-level TFP, sales and cash-flow, higher probabilities to engage in R&D and export. We find no significant effects for firms from industrialized economies and negative effects for firms in other emerging economies, which are less export-intensive and more import-intensive.Link

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The Currency-Plus-Commodity Basket: A Proposal for Exchange Rates in Oil-Exporting Countries to Accommodate Trade Shocks Automatically

The Currency-Plus-Commodity Basket: A Proposal for Exchange Rates in Oil-Exporting Countries to Accommodate Trade Shocks Automatically. Jeffrey Frankel, March 2017, Paper, “The paper proposes an exchange rate regime for oil-exporting countries. The goal is to achieve the best of both flexible and fixed exchange rates. The arrangement is designed to deliver monetary policy that counteracts rather than exacerbates the effects of swings in the oil market, while yet offering the day-to-day transparency and predictability of a currency peg. The proposal is to peg the national currency to a basket, but a basket that includes not only the currencies of major trading partners (in particular, the dollar and the euro), but also the export commodity (oil). The plan is called Currency-plus-Commodity Basket (CCB). The paper begins by fleshing out the need for an innovative arrangement that allows accommodation to trade shocks.Link

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The Country Chronologies to Exchange Rate Arrangements into the 21st Century: Will the Anchor Currency Hold?

The Country Chronologies to Exchange Rate Arrangements into the 21st Century: Will the Anchor Currency Hold? Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, February 2017, Paper, “Detailed country-by-country chronologies are an informative companion piece to our paper “Exchange Arrangements Entering the 21st Century: Which Anchor Will Hold?,” which provides a comprehensive history of anchor or reference currencies, exchange rate arrangements, and a new measure of foreign exchange restrictions for 194 countries and territories over 1946-2016. The individual country chronologies are also a central component of our approach to classifying regimes. These country histories date dual or multiple exchange rate episodes, as well as to differentiate between pre-announced pegs, crawling pegs, and bands from their de facto counterparts. We think it is important to distinguish between say, de facto pegs or bands from announced pegs or bands, because their properties are potentially different. The chronologies also flag the dates for important turning points, such as when the exchange rate first floated, or when the anchor currency was changed. We extend our chronologies as far back as possible, even though we only classify regimes from 1946 onwards.Link

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The Effects of a Stronger Dollar on U.S. Prices

The Effects of a Stronger Dollar on U.S. Prices. Gita Gopinath, December 1, 2015, Paper. “Since 2014:Q3, the U.S. dollar has experienced the third-fastest appreciation in over 30 years, with its nominal exchange and real exchange rate rising 15 percent against almost all foreign currencies (as measured by the Major Currencies Dollar Index). This sudden and rapid gain has engendered concerns about how a stronger dollar will affect U.S. export and import prices and ultimately, consumer prices and inflation in the United States. This paper assembles a rich database, spanning the period from 1985:Q1 through 2014:Q4, that combines several measures of prices and exchange rates in order to examine the likely outlook for U.S. import and export prices and consumer prices in the short run (one quarter) and over a 24-month period.Link

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