Found 3 article(s) for author 'environmental impacts'

Trade Shifts Pollution More than Regs Shift Trade

Trade Shifts Pollution More than Regs Shift Trade. Joseph Aldy, September/October 2018, Paper, “Burning coal to power manufacturing
contributes to premature mortality in the United States and in developing countries alike. Despite stringent environmental regulations, U.S. coal-fired power plants still cause tens of thousands of early deaths each year. Any factor that causes manufacturing activity to shift from the United States to other countries can also shift the demand for coal-fired power — and its pollution — to these other countries.Link

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Irreparability as Irreversibility

Irreparability as Irreversibility. Cass Sunstein, 2018, Paper, “Some things, people say, are “gone forever.” But what exactly does that mean? Some losses are irreparable in the sense that nothing can be done to restore the status quo ante – or if something can be done, it is not enough (or perhaps outsiders can never know if it is). The Irreversible Harm Precautionary Principle takes the form of an insistence on paying a premium to freeze the status quo and to maintain flexibility for the future, while new information is acquired. In many settings, it makes sense to pay for an option to avoid a risk of irreversible losses. An implicit understanding of option value can be found in the emphasis on irreversibility in National Environmental Policy Act and other federal statutes, along with many international agreements.” Link

Tags: , , , ,

Securing Property Rights

Securing Property Rights. Edward Glaeser, Andrei Shleifer, September 2016, Paper, “A central challenge in securing property rights is the subversion of justice through legal skill, bribery, or physical force by the strong—the state or its powerful citizens—against the weak. We present evidence that the less educated and poorer citizens in many countries feel their property rights are least secure. We then present a model of a farmer and a mine which can pollute his farm in a jurisdiction where the mine can subvert law enforcement. We show that, in this model, injunctions or other forms of property rules work better than compensation for damage or liability rules. The equivalences of the Coase Theorem break down in realistic ways. The case for injunctions is even stronger when parties can invest in power. Our approach sheds light on several controversies in law and economics, but also applies to practical problems in developing countries, such as low demand for formality, law enforcement under uncertain property rights, and unresolved conflicts between environmental damage and development.Link

Tags: , , , , ,