Found 38 article(s) for author 'Entrepreneurship'

Coordination Frictions in Venture Capital Syndicates

Coordination Frictions in Venture Capital Syndicates. Ramana Nanda, Matthew Rhodes-Kropf, 2019, Book Chapter, “A clear implication of these potential frictions is that entrepreneurs need to be careful about how to select and build the syndicate of VC investors that back their firm … 18–037). Harvard Business School…Link

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Parallel Play: Startups, Nascent Markets, and the Effective Design of a Business Model

Parallel Play: Startups, Nascent Markets, and the Effective Design of a Business Model. Rory MacDonald, 2019, Paper, “Prior research advances several explanations for entrepreneurial success in nascent markets but leaves a key imperative unexplored: the business model. By studying five ventures in the same nascent market, we develop a novel theoretical framework for understanding how entrepreneurs effectively design business models: parallel play. Similar to parallel play by preschoolers, entrepreneurs engaged in parallel play interweave action, cognition, and timing to accelerate learning about a novel world. Specifically, they (1) borrow from peers and focus on established substitutes, (2) test assumptions, then commit to a broad business-model template, and (3) pause before elaborating the activity system. The insights from our framework contribute to research on optimal distinctiveness, and to the learning and evolutionary-adjustment literature on search. More broadly, we blend organization theory with a fresh theoretical lens—business-model processes—to highlight how organizations actually work and create value.Link

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Parallel Play: Startups, Nascent Markets, and the Effective Design of a Business Model

Parallel Play: Startups, Nascent Markets, and the Effective Design of a Business Model. Rory McDonald, 2019, Paper, “Prior research advances several explanations for entrepreneurial success in nascent markets but leaves a key imperative unexplored: the business model. By studying five ventures in the same nascent market, we develop a novel theoretical framework for understanding how entrepreneurs effectively design business models: parallel play. Similar to parallel play by preschoolers, entrepreneurs engaged in parallel play interweave action, cognition, and timing to accelerate learning about a novel world. Specifically, they (1) borrow from peers and focus on established substitutes, (2) test assumptions, then commit to a broad business-model template, and (3) pause before elaborating the activity system. The insights from our framework contribute to research on optimal distinctiveness, and to the learning and evolutionary-adjustment literature on search. More broadly, we blend organization theory with a fresh theoretical lens—business-model processes—to highlight how organizations actually work and create value.Link

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Social entrepreneurship as field encroachment: how a neoliberal social movement constructed a new field

Social entrepreneurship as field encroachment: how a neoliberal social movement constructed a new field. Tamara Kay, Marshall Ganz, May 18, 2019, Paper, “In explaining the emergence of new strategic action fields, in which social movements’ and organizations’ logic, rules and strategies are forged, inter-field dynamics remain under-explored. The case of Social Enterprise and Entrepreneurship (SEE) shows how new fields can emerge through field encroachment, whereby shifts among overlapping fields create structural opportunities for the ascendency of new fields, which may adapt logics borrowed from adjacent fields to construct legitimacy. SEE leveraged the 1980s’ shift between first-order market and state fields to encroach on the political strategies of community organizing, birthing a neoliberal social movement to create a new field addressing social problems using market-based, profit-motivated approaches. With its borrowed veneer of justice, SEE rapidly developed a high academic and public profile over just three decades, despite little evidence its approach to solving social problems works. In encroaching on proven political strategies for solving social problems, it may further undermine democratic practices.Link

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Innovation, competition and sectoral evolution: an introduction to the special section on Industrial Dynamics

Innovation, competition and sectoral evolution: an introduction to the special section on Industrial Dynamics. Gary Pisano, March 29, 2019, Paper, “This paper is the introduction to the ICC special section on Industrial Dynamics. Industrial dynamics has a venerable heritage in economics and after a long dormant period, it has witnessed a major resurgence beginning in the early 1980s. The current Special Section takes stock of the progress along this new and rich intellectual journey. This Introduction does not aim to present a review of the accomplishments reached in the last period. Rather, it reflects on the broad themes characterizing our progress in understanding industry evolution and industrial dynamics.Link

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Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton

Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton. Tarun Khanna, February 14, 2019, Audio, “In his book, Professor Khanna discusses the inherent trust that comes with the established customs and institutions of the developed world — through contracts, regulatory bodies, and so on — but this practice is seen less in the developing world. As a result, entrepreneurs looking to work in the developing world must first build a basis of trust with the individuals they’ll be working with if they want to be successful.” Link

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Learning to Improve the World: How Injaz Al-Arab helps youth in the Middle East develop an entrepreneurial mindset

Learning to Improve the World: How Injaz Al-Arab helps youth in the Middle East develop an entrepreneurial mindset. Fernando Reimers, August 2018, Book, “The world is changing rapidly. Globalization and technological innovation have created new opportunities and challenges for individuals, communities and nations. With these changes it has become necessary to revisit to what extent children and youth are being prepared to be effective and productive citizens and workers, and to what extent they are equipped not just to understand the future, but to invent it. In the 21st century the skills and dispositions necessary to live meaningful lives, to participate socially, civically and economically, have expanded from those which were sufficient in the past.Link

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Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries

Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries. Tarun Khanna, 2018, Book, “Entrepreneurs in developing countries who assume they will have the same legal, governmental, and institutional protections as their counterparts in the West will fail. To succeed, they need to build trust within the existing structures–and this book shows how it’s done.Link

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Immigrant Entrepreneurship in America: Evidence from the Survey of Business Owners 2007 & 2012

Immigrant Entrepreneurship in America: Evidence from the Survey of Business Owners 2007 & 2012. William Kerr, April 2018, Paper, “We study immigrant entrepreneurship and firm ownership in 2007 and 2012 using the Survey of Business Owners (SBO). The survival and growth of immigrant-owned businesses over time relative to native-founded companies is evaluated by linking the 2007 SBO to the Longitudinal Business Database (LBD). We quantify the dependency of the United States as a whole, as well as individual states, on the contributions of immigrant entrepreneurs in terms of firm formation and job creation. We describe differences in the types of businesses started by immigrants and the quality of jobs created by their firms.Link

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The Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History and the Daimonic Entrepreneur

The Harvard Research Center in Entrepreneurial History and the Daimonic Entrepreneur. Sophus Reinert, 2017, Paper, “This paper sketches the intellectual history of the Research Center in Entrepreneurial History, founded at Harvard in 1948, which helped established the contours of business history as a discipline. This history was shaped by the rivalry between N. S. B. Gras, the “father of business history,” and Arthur H. Cole, which defined still extant polarities in the field of business history. It provides context for the emergence of the figure of the “entrepreneur,” conceived of as an ambiguous and potent force of creative destruction, and of entrepreneurship as business history’s preeminent and vital dynamic. The paper focuses on German émigré Fritz L. Redlich, who was central to the Center’s work, and whose “creative entrepreneur” was conceived in explicit relation to the daimon, the godlike, frighteningly ambiguous, and often destructive power of inspiration and creativity.Link

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