Found 96 article(s) for author 'Edward Glaeser'

Housing Booms and City Centers

Housing Booms and City Centers. Edward Glaeser, Kristina Tobio, Joshua Gottlieb, March 2012, Paper. “Popular discussions often treat the great housing boom of the 1996-2006 period as if it were a national phenomenon with similar impacts across locales, but across metropolitan areas, price growth was dramatically higher in warmer, less educated cities with less initial density and higher initial housing values. Within metropolitan areas, price growth was faster in neighborhoods closer to the city center. The centralization of price growth during the boom was particularly dramatic in those metropolitan areas where income is higher away from the…” Link

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The End of the Segregated Century: Racial Separation in America’s Neighborhoods, 1890-2010

The End of the Segregated Century: Racial Separation in America’s Neighborhoods, 1890-2010. Edward Glaeser, January 2012, Paper. “Over the past century, residential segregation in the United States has undergone two radical transformations. The first occurred between 1910 and 1960, as African-American migration to cities met with white hostility and produced massive ghettos in almost every major city. The second transformation is still ongoing, according to recently released data from the 2010 census. Segregation has declined steadily from its mid-century peak, with significant drops in every decade since 1970. As of…” Link

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The Challenge of Urban Policy

The Challenge of Urban Policy. Edward Glaeser, November 1, 2011, Paper. “Urbanization almost invariably accompanies development, and the cities of India and China are experiencing spectacular increases in population. The concentration of millions of people in a small mass creates challenges for public policy, especially in the areas of basic infrastructure, public health, traffic congestion, and often law enforcement as well. In this essay, I discuss five core debates in urban policy, including the optimal degree of federalism, private versus public provision of urban services, optimal land use…” (May require purchase or user account) Link

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The Only Way is Up

The Only Way is Up. Edward Glaeser, September 21, 2011, Paper. “An economist explains the liberal principles which shape his perspective on architecture and the future of cities. Economists have no interest in aesthetics but recognise the accommodation of diverse tastes as an important aspect of freedom. Excessive historic preservation and barriers to building upwards are often unnecessary constraints on freedom. The economic and environmental case for building denser, higher cities depends ultimately on the architect’s freedom to take risks. Economists and architects have complementary, not competing, sets of skills…” Link

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Unleash the Entrepreneurs: Bad Policies are Holding Back the Ultimate Job Creators

Unleash the Entrepreneurs: Bad Policies are Holding Back the Ultimate Job Creators. Edward Glaeser, September 2011, Paper. “Three years have passed since the financial crisis of 2008, and unemployment rates remain painfully high. As of August 2011, America employed 6.6 million fewer workers than it did four years earlier. To try to fix the problem, the Obama administration has pursued a variety of Keynesian measures — above all, the huge stimulus package of 2009, which included not only direct government spending but also such features as tax credits for home buyers and temporary tax cuts for most Americans…” Link

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Cities: Engines of Innovation

Cities: Engines of Innovation. Edward Glaeser, September 2011, Paper. “Glaeser discusses the innovations that are happening in the cities. Cities bring opportunities for wealth and for the creative inspiration that can result only from face-to-face contact with others. In fact, the crush of people living in close quarters fosters the kind of collaborative creativity that has produced some of humanity’s best ideas, including the industrial revolution and the digital age. In the years ahead such collaborations can be expected to help solve the world’s most pressing problems-poverty, energy shortages, climate change-and…” (May require purchase or user account) Link

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Brains Over Buildings

Brains Over Buildings. Edward Glaeser, September 2011, Paper. “Detroit once had 1.85 million inhabitants. Now it has fewer than 740,000. Cleveland and St. Louis, too, are half the size they were in 1950. Across the Atlantic, Liverpool and Leipzig are also dramatically smaller. When so many cities are booming, why are some trapped in decline? Cities naturally rise and fall as technologies change. Detroit and the other cities of the Great Lakes established themselves as agricultural transport hubs before the Civil War. Afterward, they enjoyed a second growth spurt when American industry settled along waterways…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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New Land of Opportunity

New Land of Opportunity. Edward Glaeser, April 20, 2011, Paper. “Mumbai’s Dharavi slum is the most entrepreneurial place I’ve ever been. In one dark room–open to the street–there are two men recycling boxes by turning them inside out and re-stapling them. Across the dusty street, six women work together sorting great bins of plastic products for recycling. A few doorways down two men are maniacally sewing brassieres, just like on Manhattan’s Lower East Side in 1905. A little ways off craftspeople are painting and firing intricately designed ceramics. The UN estimates that 828 million people, which is about 12% of humanity, live in slums…” Link

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Cities, Skills and Regional Change

Cities, Skills and Regional Change. Edward Glaeser, Kristina Tobio, April 2011, Paper. “One approach to urban areas emphasizes the existence of certain immutable relationships, such as Zipf’s or Gibrat’s law. An alternative view is that urban change reflects individual responses to changing tastes or technologies. This paper examines almost 200 years of regional change in the United States and finds that few, if any, growth relationships remain constant, including Gibrat’s law. Education does a reasonable job of explaining urban resilience in recent decades, but it does not seem to predict county growth a century ago. After reviewing this evidence…” Link

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Detroit’s Decline and the Folly of Light Rail

Detroit’s Decline and the Folly of Light Rail. Edward Glaeser, March 25, 2011, Opinion. “The Census just reported that Detroit’s population dropped by 25% between 2000 and 2010, a stunning fall that is even larger than the 20% drop Detroit experienced during the 1970s. The story of this city’s devastating decline reminds us that urban fortunes depend on entrepreneurial human capital. Failed public policies that tried to fix Detroit with urban renewal and transportation projects stand as stark evidence against the view that our economic woes call for more federal spending on infrastructure…” May require purchase or user account. Link

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