Found 93 article(s) for author 'Edward Glaeser'

Entrepreneurship and the City

Entrepreneurship and the City. Edward Glaeser, October 2007, Paper. “Why do levels of entrepreneurship differ across America’s cities? This paper presents basic facts on two measures of entrepreneurship: the self-employment rate and the number of small firms. Both of these measures are correlated with urban success, suggesting that more entrepreneurial cities are more successful. There is considerable variation in the self-employment rate across metropolitan areas, but about one-half of this heterogeneity can be explained by demographic and industrial variation. Self-employment is particularly associated with abundant, older…” Link

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When Are Ghettos Bad? Lessons from Immigrant Segregation in the United States

When Are Ghettos Bad? Lessons from Immigrant Segregation in the United States. Edward Glaeser, David Cutler, May 2007, Paper. “Recent literature on the relationship between ethnic or racial segregation and outcomes has failed to produce a consensus view of the role of ghettos; some studies suggest that residence in an enclave is beneficial, some reach the opposite conclusion, and still others imply that any relationship is small. This paper presents new evidence on this relationship using data on first-generation immigrants in the United States. Using average group characteristics as instruments for segregation, controlling…” Link

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The Rise of the Sunbelt

The Rise of the Sunbelt. Edward Glaeser, Kristina Tobio, April 2007, Paper. “In the last 50 years, population and incomes have increased steadily throughout much of the Sunbelt. This paper assesses the relative contributions of rising productivity, rising demand for Southern amenities and increases in housing supply to the growth of warm areas, using data on income, housing price and population growth. Before 1980, economic productivity increased significantly in warmer areas and drove the population growth in those places. Since 1980, productivity growth has been more modest, but housing supply growth has been…” Link

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