Found 13 article(s) for author 'Economics'

Don’t Blame Economics, Blame Public Policy

Don’t Blame Economics, Blame Public Policy. Ricardo Hausmann, September 1, 2019, Opinion, “Engineering and medicine have in many respects become separate from their respective underlying sciences of physics and biology. Public-policy schools, which typically have a strong economics focus, must now rethink the way they teach students – and medical schools could offer a model to follow.Link

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The Case for a Bold Economics

The Case for a Bold Economics. Dani Rodrik, March 11, 2019, Opinion, “Although economists are well positioned to imagine new institutional arrangements, their habit of thinking at the margin and sticking close to the evidence at hand encourages an aversion to radical change. But, when presented with new challenges, economists must envision new solutions – as a new group is determined to do.Link

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Behind the Scenes with Harvard’s Martin Feldstein

Behind the Scenes with Harvard’s Martin Feldstein. Martin Feldstein, February 27, 2019, Audio, “Bloomberg Surveillance’s Tom Keene sits down with Harvard University George F. Baker Professor of Economics Martin Feldstein to discuss his work in Washington with President Reagan, the importance of introductory economics courses, and his time as an undergraduate at Harvard University.Link

 

 

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Lessons from Immigration Economics

Lessons from Immigration Economics. George Borjas, Winter 2018, Paper, “The article offers information on the things to be learnt from the immigration economics. Topics discussed include West Germany and European countries recruited and imported hundreds of guest workers from Turkey; book “Exodus: How Migration Is Changing Our World” by Paul Collier addresses question in development economics never directly worked on immigration issues in his academic work.; and researches ignoring the implication of the decisions potential immigrants.Link

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Advances in Economics and Econometrics: Volume 1: Eleventh World Congress

Advances in Economics and Econometrics: Volume 1: Eleventh World Congress. Ariel Pakes, October 2017, Book, “This is the first of two volumes containing papers and commentaries presented at the Eleventh World Congress of the Econometric Society, held in Montreal, Canada in August 2015. These papers provide state-of-the-art guides to the most important recent research in economics. The book includes surveys and interpretations of key developments in economics and econometrics, and discussion of future directions for a wide variety of topics, covering both theory and application. These volumes provide a unique, accessible survey of progress on the discipline, written by leading specialists in their fields. The first volume includes theoretical and applied papers addressing topics such as dynamic mechanism design, agency problems, and networks.Link

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Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science

Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science. Dani Rodrik, October 2016, Book, “Rethinking economics, from the inside out. In the wake of the financial crisis and the Great Recession, economics seems anything but a science. In this sharp, masterfully argued book, Dani Rodrik, a leading critic from within, takes a close look at economics to examine when it falls short and when it works, to give a surprisingly upbeat account of the discipline.Link

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The Curse of Cash

The Curse of Cash. Kenneth Rogoff, 2016, Book, “The world is drowning in cash—and it’s making us poorer and less safe. In The Curse of Cash, Kenneth Rogoff, one of the world’s leading economists, makes a persuasive and fascinating case for an idea that until recently would have seemed outlandish: getting rid of most paper money.  Even as people in advanced economies are using less paper money, there is more cash in circulation—a record $1.4 trillion in U.S. dollars alone, or $4,200 for every American, mostly in $100 bills. And the United States is hardly exceptional. So what is all that cash being used for? The answer is simple: a large part is feeding tax evasion, corruption, terrorism, the drug trade, human trafficking, and the rest of a massive global underground economy.Link

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Diets and Health: How Food Decisions Are Shaped by Biology, Economics, Geography, and Social Interactions

Diets and Health: How Food Decisions Are Shaped by Biology, Economics, Geography, and Social Interactions. Ichiro Kawachi, September 16, 2015, Paper. “Health is shaped by both personal choices and features of the food environment. Food-choice decisions depend on complex interactions between biology and behavior, and are further modulated by the built environment and community structure. That lower-income families have lower-quality diets is well established. Yet, diet quality also varies across small geographic neighborhoods and can be influenced by transportation, retail, and ease of access to healthy…” Link

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Mancur Olson and the Tragedy of the Unbalanced Commons

Mancur Olson and the Tragedy of the Unbalanced Commons. Richard Zeckhauser, 2015, Book Chapter. “Economists constitute a rich menagerie. The vast majority of economists are patient toilers. In their everyday investigations, conducting regressions, tallying benefits and costs, and taking derivatives, they till the local fields. Yet, the most famous economists are often the equivalent of fierce warlords, capturing intellectual territory and fighting off those who seek, with alternative models and rival empirical analyses, to occupy it. Those who follow these warlords work in concert, like armies. Warlords and their lieutenants together can dominate vast domains...” Link

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Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet

Climate Shock: The Economic Consequences of a Hotter Planet, Martin L. Weitzman, 2015, Book, If you had a 10 percent chance of having a fatal car accident, you’d take necessary precautions. If your finances had a 10 percent chance of suffering a severe loss, you’d reevaluate your assets. So if we know the world is warming and there’s a 10 percent chance this might eventually lead to a catastrophe beyond anything we could imagine, why aren’t we doing more about climate change right now? We insure our lives against an uncertain future–why not our planet? Link

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