Found 6 article(s) for author 'economic inequality'

The American Dream Is Harder To Find In Some Neighborhoods

The American Dream Is Harder To Find In Some Neighborhoods. Raj Chetty, 10/1/18, Audio, “Does the neighborhood you grow up in determine how far you move up the economic ladder? A new online data tool being made public Monday finds a strong correlation between where people are raised and their chances of achieving the American dream.Link

Opportunity Atlas –

https://www.opportunityatlas.org/

 

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Good Credit and the Good Life: Credit Scores Predict Subjective Well-Being

Good Credit and the Good Life: Credit Scores Predict Subjective Well-Being. Ashley Whillans, 2018, Paper, “Can money buy happiness? To examine this question, research in economics, psychology, and sociology has focused almost exclusively on examining the associations between income,
spending or wealth and subjective well-being. Moving beyond this research, we provide the first empirical evidence that credit scores uniquely predict happiness. Across two samples, from the United Kingdom (N=615) and the United States (N=768), credit scores predicted life satisfaction even after controlling for a range of financial covariates, including income, spending, savings, debt, and home-ownership. Respondents with higher credit scores felt more optimistic about their future, promoting happiness.Link

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The State of the World with Rawi Abdelal

The State of the World with Rawi Abdelal. Rawi Abdelal, February 24, 2017, Audio, “At this moment of great geopolitical change, Davis Center Director Rawi Abdelal looks at the fate of globalization through the lenses of great power transitions, national borders, and economic inequality. Rawi Abdelal is the Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Management at Harvard Business School and the Director of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. His work focuses on international political economy and the politics of globalization and political economy of Eurasia.Link

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A Country Divided: The Growing Opportunity Gap in America

A Country Divided: The Growing Opportunity Gap in America. Robert Putnam, 2016, Paper, “Are the destinies of children from poor and wealthy families diverging? This paper explains why this is the question to ask if we wish to study equality of opportunity in America today. Drawing on the research behind Robert Putnam’s (2015) Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis, we show that, since the 1970s, children in the top-third and the bottom-third of the socioeconomic hierarchy have sharply diverged on factors predicting life success. This gaping “opportunity gap” augurs a collapse of social mobility in the decades ahead. Given the causes of the opportunity gap, we explore promising policy options for restoring equality of opportunity in America.Link

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Invisible Inequality Leads to Punishing the Poor and Rewarding the Rich

Invisible Inequality Leads to Punishing the Poor and Rewarding the Rich. Michael I. Norton, November 10, 2016, Paper, “How does lack of awareness of income inequality affect behaviour towards the rich and poor? To address this question, we assigned participants either at random or based on merit to one of five income levels (reflective of the U.S. income distribution), who then played a repeated public goods game with punishment, reward or both. When participants did not know the income distribution, they punished the poor and rewarded the rich.Link

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Who speaks for the dispossessed?

Who speaks for the dispossessed? Matthew Desmond, April 22, 2015, Paper. “This commentary articulates three perspectives on race in America: economic determinism, institutionalism and a field-theoretic approach. It argues that William Julius Wilson’s masterwork, The Declining Significance of Race, was informed by the first and anticipated the latter two. Wilson’s most profound and enduring legacy is his unwavering concern for the dispossessed...” Link

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