Found 1359 article(s) for author 'Economic Growth'

Productivity and Pay: Is the Link Broken?

Productivity and Pay: Is the Link Broken? Lawrence Summers, June 2018, Paper, “Since 1973 median compensation in the United States has diverged starkly from average labor productivity. Since 2000, average compensation has also begun to diverge from labor productivity. These divergences lead to the question: Holding all else equal, to what extent does productivity growth translate into compensation growth for typical American workers? We investigate this, regressing median, average, and  production/nonsupervisory compensation growth on productivity growth in various specifications. We find substantial evidence of linkage between productivity and compensation…Link

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Slower Productivity and Higher Inequality: Are They Related?

Slower Productivity and Higher Inequality: Are They Related? Jason Furman, June 2018, Paper, “Income growth for typical American families has slowed dramatically since 1973. Slower productivity growth and an increase in income inequality have both contributed to this trend. This paper addresses whether there is a relationship between the productivity slowdown and the increase in inequality, specifically exploring the extent to which reduced competition and dynamism can explain both of these phenomena. Productivity growth has been uneven across the economy, with top firms earning increasingly skewed returns. At the same time, the between-firm disparities have been important in explaining the increase in labor income inequality.Link

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U.S. tariffs boost trade tensions and protectionist theory

U.S. tariffs boost trade tensions and protectionist theory. Jeffry Frieden, June 14, 2018, Audio, “In the potential tariff war between China and the United States, each state is choosing to protect different sectors. Which is right? And is there a way for a country to engage in “good” protectionism for its own interests? First off, economists in general agree that tariffs should be avoided because they bring costly trade-offs. If a country taxes imported sneakers, for instance, it helps domestic shoemakers but deprives shoe buyers of the best, low-price kicks.Link

 

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The Republicans’ Protectionist Pedigree

The Republicans’ Protectionist Pedigree. Jeffrey Frankel, June 13, 2018, Opinion, “In recent decades, US Republicans have tended to embrace free trade more willingly than US Democrats. But, during most of its first century, the Republican Party was protectionist in both word and deed, and it has elected the four most aggressively protectionist presidents of the last 50 years.Link

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A Breath of Bad Air: Cost of the Trump Environmental Agenda May Lead to 80 000 Extra Deaths per Decade

A Breath of Bad Air: Cost of the Trump Environmental Agenda May Lead to 80 000 Extra Deaths per Decade. David Cutler, Francesca Dominici, June 12, 2018, Paper, “President Donald Trump and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt have pledged to reexamine landmark environmental policies and to repeal regulations. In their view, excessive regulations are harming US industry, and thus reducing regulation will be good for business. As Donald Trump has said, seemingly without irony, “We are going to get rid of the regulations that are just destroying us. You can’t breathe—you cannot breathe.”” Link

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The Persistence of Colonial Laws: Why Rwanda is Ready to Remove Outdated Legal Barriers to Health, Human Rights, and Development

The Persistence of Colonial Laws: Why Rwanda is Ready to Remove Outdated Legal Barriers to Health, Human Rights, and Development. Richard Freeman, Agnes Binagwaho, June 10, 2018, Paper, “Rwanda has earned a reputation as a trailblazer among developing nations. Especially in the health sector, it is often the early-adopter of international recommendations and new technologies. Yet at times, Rwanda’s momentum is impeded when it must grapple with a challenge that post-colonial societies commonly face: the persistence of colonial laws. When left in force, these legal vestiges, once designed to oppress and subordinate, can rear their head at unexpected moments, causing delays in policy implementation, uncertainty, or unjust outcomes.Link

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Are Emerging Markets the Canary in the Financial Coal Mine?

Are Emerging Markets the Canary in the Financial Coal Mine? Kenneth Rogoff, June 6, 2018, Opinion, “Economists who assure us that advanced-economy debt is completely “safe” sound eerily like those who touted the “Great Moderation” – the supposedly permanent reduction in cyclical volatility – a generation ago. In many cases, they are the same people.Link

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Larry Summers Discusses Areas of Growth and Concern for the U.S. Economy

Larry Summers Discusses Areas of Growth and Concern for the U.S. Economy. Lawrence Summers, June 5, 2018, Audio, [Episode 1] “In our inaugural episode, Former US Treasury Secretary Larry Summers tackles issues of sustainable growth, equality of opportunity, and why the story of China is more important than the Industrial Revolution.Link

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