Found 3 article(s) for author 'dollar'

Dollar Invoicing and the Heterogeneity of Exchange Rate Pass-Through

Dollar Invoicing and the Heterogeneity of Exchange Rate Pass-Through. Gita Gopinath, 2019, Paper, “The vast majority of international goods trade is invoiced in a dominant currency, which is most often the U.S. dollar (Goldberg and Tille (2008); Gopinath (2015); Casas et al. (2016); Boz, Gopinath and Plagborg-Møller (2017)). Accordingly, the dominant currency paradigm (DCP) bargained transactions the empirically relevant framework for analyzing trade responses to exchange rate fluctuations and international spillovers of monetary policy. The theoretical framework underlying DCP predicts that pass through from exchange rates to prices or quantities should vary across countries, depending on the share of imports invoiced in dollars.Link

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Dollar Dominance in Trade and Finance

Dollar Dominance in Trade and Finance. Gita Gopinath, 2019, Book Chapter, “According to the major paradigm in international macroeconomics, namely the Mundell-Fleming paradigm (Mundell 1963; Fleming 1962), the importance of a country’s currency in international trade is tied closely to its share in world trade. This is because each country is assumed to export its goods in its own currency. That is, if we consider trade among the United States, India, and Japan, the assumption is that all exports from the United States are invoiced in dollars, all exports from Japan are invoiced in yen, and all exports from India are invoiced in rupees. Further, because the paradigm assumes that prices are sticky in the exporter’s currency, exchange rate fluctuations across countries affect their bilateral terms of trade, defined as the ratio of the at-the-dock price of imports to that of exports.Link

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Why Treasury secretaries should stick with the strong dollar mantra

Why Treasury secretaries should stick with the strong dollar mantra. Lawrence Summers, January 25, 2018, Opinion, “Yesterday in Davos, Secretary Steven Mnuchin left the impression that he might be reversing 25 years of US Treasury strong dollar policy by asserting that, “obviously a weaker dollar is good for us as it relates to trade and opportunities”.  The dollar then had its biggest one-day decline in nearly a year and bond yields rose.Link

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