Found 16 article(s) for author 'Developing Countries'

Why Trust Is the Gold Standard in Developing Countries

Why Trust Is the Gold Standard in Developing Countries. Tarun Khanna, April 18, 2019, Audio, “Entrepreneurs in the developing world face a distinct disadvantage over their Western counterparts – a widespread lack of trust. Western nations have spent centuries putting in place customs, institutions and regulations to support new companies. But those structures don’t necessarily exist in places like India, South America, Africa or China. Harvard Business School professor Tarun Khanna believes smart entrepreneurs who want to succeed in places with “rampant mistrust” must build their own microcosm of trust with employees, partners and customers. Khanna, who is also director of the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard, details this approach in his new book, Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries. He spoke on the Knowledge@Wharton radio show on SiriusXM about why a conventional strategy doesn’t work wherever societal mistrust is the norm.Link

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Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton

Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton. Tarun Khanna, February 14, 2019, Audio, “In his book, Professor Khanna discusses the inherent trust that comes with the established customs and institutions of the developed world — through contracts, regulatory bodies, and so on — but this practice is seen less in the developing world. As a result, entrepreneurs looking to work in the developing world must first build a basis of trust with the individuals they’ll be working with if they want to be successful.” Link

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Environmental Economics, Developing Nations and Michael Greenstone

Environmental Economics, Developing Nations and Michael Greenstone. Rema Hanna, 2019, Book Chapter, “I am very excited for this opportunity to honor Michael Greenstone and his work in shaping how we think about environmental economics in developing countries. What I’d like to do today is talk about Michael’s contributions in development and environmental economics, particularly around why we even really care that environmental economics is being focused on developing countries. I also will discuss work with Michael that illustrates the complexity of crafting effective environmental policy in developing countries and the potentially big pay-offs of effective policy.Link

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Are economic rents good for development? Evidence from the manufacturing sector

Are economic rents good for development? Evidence from the manufacturing sector. Eric Werker, December 2018, Paper, “Are rents, or excess profits, good for development? Rents could induce firms to lobby or bribe governments to preserve the status quo; on the other hand, rents may promote growth by giving firms the needed funds to make investments in fixed capital or research and development. To test this question empirically, we use a panel of manufacturing data at the industry-country-year level, and measure rents by the mark-up ratio. We find that the relationship between rents and growth is strongly negative, with the results being primarily driven by the poorer countries (or those with worse institutions) in the sample.Link

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Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries

Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries. Tarun Khanna, 2018, Book, “Entrepreneurs in developing countries who assume they will have the same legal, governmental, and institutional protections as their counterparts in the West will fail. To succeed, they need to build trust within the existing structures–and this book shows how it’s done.Link

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Inclusive Growth: Profitable Strategies for Tackling Poverty and Inequality

Inclusive Growth: Profitable Strategies for Tackling Poverty and Inequality. Robert Kaplan, George Serafeim, January 2018, Paper, “More than a billion people in the developing world remain in extreme poverty and outside the formal economy. Traditional CSR programs have done little to alleviate the situation and rarely produce transformative change. Instead of trying to fix local problems, the authors argue, corporations need to reimagine the regional ecosystems in which they participate. They should search for systemic, multisector opportunities; mobilize complementary partners; and obtain seed and scale-up financing from organizations with a mission to alleviate poverty.Link

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Urban Economics for the Developing World: An Introduction

Urban Economics for the Developing World: An Introduction. Edward Glaeser, 2017, Paper, “This is an introduction to the special issue of the Journal of Urban Economics on “Urbanization in Developing Countries: Past and Present”. We argue that the rapid urbanization and the rise of cities in the developing world demand new avenues of research and much more research to deal with the urban issues facing billions of people across the world that current work barely covers. This issue contains papers which move in that direction and signals a commitment by the journal to pursue this agenda.LInk

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Harvard Hosts Forum on Feeding the Planet During Climate Change

Harvard Hosts Forum on Feeding the Planet During Climate Change. Calestous Juma, December 19, 2016, Video, “A forum on “The Future of Food, Feeding the Planet During Climate Change” took place at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and was presented jointly with the Public Radio International program, “The World,” and WGBH on Tuesday, December 13.Link

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Developing Countries and International Organizations: Introduction to the Special Issue

Developing Countries and International Organizations: Introduction to the Special Issue. Eric Werker, April 30, 2016, Paper. “We describe four megatrends since the end of the Cold War that relate to developing countries: a greater share of the global economy; more accessible technologies, particularly in communication; breakthroughs in global cooperation in tackling basic human needs; and the evolution of a complex set of problems in spite of the progress. We then examine potential political economy channels that might hinder the ability of international organizations to adapt to the new realities. Introducing the articles to the special issue, we argue for four distinct variables that affect the behavior and character of international organizations: power, norms, preferences, and problems.Link

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Is Liberal Democracy Feasible in Developing Countries?

Is Liberal Democracy Feasible in Developing Countries? Dani Rodrik, March 9, 2016, Paper. “Liberal democracy has been difficult to institute and sustain in developing countries. This has to do both with ideational factors—the absence of a liberal tradition prior to electoral mobilization—and structural conditions—the prevalence of mass mobilization along identity rather than class cleavages. This paper considers the conditions under which liberal democracy emerges and speculates about its future in developing countries.Link

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