Found 20 article(s) for author 'Developing Countries'

Flattening the COVID-19 Curve in Developing Countries

Flattening the COVID-19 Curve in Developing Countries. Ricardo Hausmann, March 24, 2020, Opinion, “The more contained you want the novel coronavirus to be, the more you will need to lock down your country – and the more fiscal space you will require to mitigate the deeper recession that will result. The problem for most of the Global South is that policymakers lack fiscal space even in the best of times.Link

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Urban waste to energy recovery assessment simulations for developing countries

Urban waste to energy recovery assessment simulations for developing countries. Venkatesh Narayanamurti, 2020, Paper, “Waste collection, treatment, and safe disposal systems are rare in developing countries as these processes and systems have been mostly viewed from a cost-centric perspective in conjunction with weak or non-existent environmental policies. Consequently, solid waste generation has turned into a problem of significant proportions in many countries with severe degradation of land, air, and water quality and adverse effects on environment and public health. New waste-to-energy (WtE) systems using municipal solid waste (MSW) to produce energy (based on emerging technologies beyond traditional incineration), can serve as a useful bridge towards sustainable waste management. In this paper, a quantitative Waste to Energy Recovery Assessment (WERA) framework is used to stochastically analyze the feasibility of WtE in selected cities in Asia. Future policy measures of feed-in tariffs, payments for avoided pollution, and higher waste collection fees are assessed to evaluate if WtE systems can be made self-sustaining investments. The results show that WtE systems can generate up to 290 GWh of electricity in Karachi, and up to 60 GWh in Delhi from municipal waste feedstock from which recyclables (such as paper and plastics) have been removed. Net Present Value (NPV) estimation shows that hybrid WtE technology systems can be feasible in Karachi and Delhi with policy support, however Jakarta’s case is challenging due to higher costs. Future investments for waste systems should use holistic evaluations that incorporate key social benefits and costs – not only of energy generation but also of emissions reductions and impacts on public health – and identify necessary policy support for ensuring viable and sustainable solutions.Link

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How to Support Developing Countries in Energy Transition

How to Support Developing Countries in Energy Transition. Kenneth Rogoff, October 11, 2019, Opinion, “Despite the severity of the climate-change crisis, much of the debate in advanced economies is entirely inward-looking, without recognizing that the real growth in carbon dioxide emissions is coming from emerging Asia. In fact, Asia already accounts for a higher share of global emissions than the United States and Europe combined.Link

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Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries

Creative Destruction or Idiot Winds: Schumpeterian Theory Meets the Educational Sector in Developing Countries. Mark Moore, 2019, Paper, “This is one of a series of working papers from “RISE”—the large-scale education systems research programme supported by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.Link

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Why Trust Is the Gold Standard in Developing Countries

Why Trust Is the Gold Standard in Developing Countries. Tarun Khanna, April 18, 2019, Audio, “Entrepreneurs in the developing world face a distinct disadvantage over their Western counterparts – a widespread lack of trust. Western nations have spent centuries putting in place customs, institutions and regulations to support new companies. But those structures don’t necessarily exist in places like India, South America, Africa or China. Harvard Business School professor Tarun Khanna believes smart entrepreneurs who want to succeed in places with “rampant mistrust” must build their own microcosm of trust with employees, partners and customers. Khanna, who is also director of the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute at Harvard, details this approach in his new book, Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries. He spoke on the Knowledge@Wharton radio show on SiriusXM about why a conventional strategy doesn’t work wherever societal mistrust is the norm.Link

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Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton

Tarun Khanna Talks Trust with Knowledge@Wharton. Tarun Khanna, February 14, 2019, Audio, “In his book, Professor Khanna discusses the inherent trust that comes with the established customs and institutions of the developed world — through contracts, regulatory bodies, and so on — but this practice is seen less in the developing world. As a result, entrepreneurs looking to work in the developing world must first build a basis of trust with the individuals they’ll be working with if they want to be successful.” Link

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Environmental Economics, Developing Nations and Michael Greenstone

Environmental Economics, Developing Nations and Michael Greenstone. Rema Hanna, 2019, Book Chapter, “I am very excited for this opportunity to honor Michael Greenstone and his work in shaping how we think about environmental economics in developing countries. What I’d like to do today is talk about Michael’s contributions in development and environmental economics, particularly around why we even really care that environmental economics is being focused on developing countries. I also will discuss work with Michael that illustrates the complexity of crafting effective environmental policy in developing countries and the potentially big pay-offs of effective policy.Link

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Are economic rents good for development? Evidence from the manufacturing sector

Are economic rents good for development? Evidence from the manufacturing sector. Eric Werker, December 2018, Paper, “Are rents, or excess profits, good for development? Rents could induce firms to lobby or bribe governments to preserve the status quo; on the other hand, rents may promote growth by giving firms the needed funds to make investments in fixed capital or research and development. To test this question empirically, we use a panel of manufacturing data at the industry-country-year level, and measure rents by the mark-up ratio. We find that the relationship between rents and growth is strongly negative, with the results being primarily driven by the poorer countries (or those with worse institutions) in the sample.Link

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Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries

Trust: Creating the Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries. Tarun Khanna, 2018, Book, “Entrepreneurs in developing countries who assume they will have the same legal, governmental, and institutional protections as their counterparts in the West will fail. To succeed, they need to build trust within the existing structures–and this book shows how it’s done.Link

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Inclusive Growth: Profitable Strategies for Tackling Poverty and Inequality

Inclusive Growth: Profitable Strategies for Tackling Poverty and Inequality. Robert Kaplan, George Serafeim, January 2018, Paper, “More than a billion people in the developing world remain in extreme poverty and outside the formal economy. Traditional CSR programs have done little to alleviate the situation and rarely produce transformative change. Instead of trying to fix local problems, the authors argue, corporations need to reimagine the regional ecosystems in which they participate. They should search for systemic, multisector opportunities; mobilize complementary partners; and obtain seed and scale-up financing from organizations with a mission to alleviate poverty.Link

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