Found 98 article(s) for author 'Dani Rodrik'

Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality?

Is Global Equality the Enemy of National Equality? Dani Rodrik, January 2017, Paper, “The bulk of global inequality is accounted for by income differences across countries rather than within countries. Expanding trade with China has aggravated inequality in some advanced economies, while ameliorating global inequality. But the “China shock” is receding and other low-income countries are unlikely to replicate China’s export-oriented industrialization experience. Relaxing restrictions on cross-border labor mobility might have an even stronger positive effect on global inequality. However it also raises a similar tension. While there would likely be adverse effects on low-skill workers in the advanced economies, international labor mobility has some advantages compared to further liberalizing international trade in goods. I argue that none of the contending perspectives — national-egalitarian, cosmopolitan, utilitarian — provides on its own an adequate frame for evaluating the consequences.Link

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The Recent Growth Boom in Developing Economies: A Structural-Change Perspective

The Recent Growth Boom in Developing Economies: A Structural-Change Perspective. Dani Rodrick, January 2017, Paper, “Growth has accelerated in a wide range of developing countries over the last couple of decades, resulting in an extraordinary period of convergence with the advanced economies. We analyze this experience from the lens of structural change – the reallocation of labor from low- to high-productivity sectors. Patterns of structural change differ greatly in the recent growth experience. In contrast to the East Asian experience, none of the recent growth accelerations in Latin America, Africa, or South Asia was driven by rapid industrialization. Beyond that, we document that recent growth accelerations were based on either rapid within-sector labor productivity growth (Latin America) or growth-increasing structural change (Africa), but rarely both at the same time.Link

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Don’t Cry Over Dead Trade Agreements

Don’t Cry Over Dead Trade Agreements. Dani Rodrik, December 8, 2016, Opinion, “The seven decades since the end of World War II were an era of trade agreements. The world’s major economies were in a perpetual state of trade negotiations, concluding two major global multilateral deals: the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the treaty establishing the World Trade Organization. In addition, more than 500 bilateral and regional trade agreements were signed – the vast majority of them since the WTO replaced the GATT in 1995.Link

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No Time for Trade Fundamentalism

No Time for Trade Fundamentalism. Dani Rodrik, October 14, 2016, Opinion, ““One of the crucial challenges” of our era “is to maintain an open and expanding international trade system.” Unfortunately, “the liberal principles” of the world trade system “are under increasing attack.” “Protectionism has become increasingly prevalent.” “There is great danger that the system will break down … or that it will collapse in a grim replay of the 1930s.”Link

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Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science

Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science. Dani Rodrik, October 2016, Book, “Rethinking economics, from the inside out. In the wake of the financial crisis and the Great Recession, economics seems anything but a science. In this sharp, masterfully argued book, Dani Rodrik, a leading critic from within, takes a close look at economics to examine when it falls short and when it works, to give a surprisingly upbeat account of the discipline.Link

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Put Globalization to Work for Democracies

Put Globalization to Work for Democracies. Dani Rodrik, September 17, 2016, Opinion, “A Chinese student once described his country’s globalization strategy to me. China, he said, opened a window to the world economy, but placed a screen on it. The country got the fresh air it needed — nearly 700 million people have been lifted from extreme poverty since the early 1980s — but kept mosquitoes out. China benefited from the flourishing of trade and investment across national borders. For many, this was the magic of globalization.Link

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The False Economic Promise of Global Governance

The False Economic Promise of Global Governance. Dani Rodrik, August 11, 2016, Opinion, “Global governance is the mantra of our era’s elite. The surge in cross-border flows of goods, services, capital, and information produced by technological innovation and market liberalization has made the world’s countries too interconnected, their argument goes, for any country to be able to solve its economic problems on its own. We need global rules, global agreements, global institutions.Link

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Comments: Dani Rodrik and James E. Rauch

Comments: Dani Rodrik and James E. Rauch. Dani Rodrik, 2016, Book Chapter, “The fascinating papers in part I of this book focus on the causes and consequences of corruption, primarily from a domestic perspective. We learn that corruption is a multifaceted and complex phenomenon, that it is often deeply rooted in the politics of a country, and that it is measurably costly in terms of foregone investment and growth opportunities as well as in terms of equity.Link

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Innovation Is Not Enough

Innovation Is Not Enough. Dani Rodrik, June 3, 2016, Opinion. “We seem to be living in an accelerated age of revolutionary technological breakthroughs. Barely a day passes without the announcement of some major new development in artificial intelligence, biotechnology, digitization, or automation. Yet those who are supposed to know where it is all taking us can’t make up their minds.Link

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Fairness and Free Trade

Fairness and Free Trade. Dani Rodrik, May 12, 2016, Opinion. “The global trade system faces an important turning point at the end of this year, one that was postponed when China joined the World Trade Organization almost 15 years ago. The United States and the European Union must decide whether they will begin to treat China as a “market economy” in their trade policies. Unfortunately, even as the battle escalates over the course of this year, the terms of the choice ensure that nothing will be done to address the global trade regime’s deeper flaws.Link

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