Found 97 article(s) for author 'Dani Rodrik'

Putting Global Governance in its Place

Putting Global Governance in its Place. Dani Rodrik, June 2019, Paper, “In a world economy that has become highly integrated, problems always seem to require more international cooperation and better global governance. The populist backlash and U.S. President Donald Trump’s trade antics, if anything, have added fuel to the economists’, technocrats’ and commentariat’s call for more internationalism. ““[V]irtually every problem destabilizing the world in this plastic moment is global in nature and can be confronted only with a coalition that is global…” wrote the New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman recently.2 Or as Nemat Shafik, then the time the deputy managing director of the International Monetary Fund, put it in 2013, “what happens anywhere affects everybody—and increasingly so. So it is pretty clear that the world needs more, not less, international coordination and cooperation.” Link

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Can Global Rules Prevent National Self-Harm?

Can Global Rules Prevent National Self-Harm? Dani Rodrik, June 11, 2019, Opinion, “Most policy mishaps in the world economy today – as in the case of US President Donald Trump’s tariffs – occur as a result of failures at the national level, not because of a lack of international cooperation. And, with the exception of two types of cases, countries should be allowed to make their own mistakes.Link

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Globalization’s Wrong Turn, And How It Hurt America

Globalization’s Wrong Turn, And How It Hurt America. Dani Rodrik, July/August 2019, Opinion, “Globalization is in trouble. A populist backlash, personified by U.S. President Donald Trump, is in full swing. A simmering trade war between China and the United States could easily boil over. Countries across Europe are shutting their borders to immigrants. Even globalization’s biggest boosters now concede that it has produced lopsided benefits and that something will have to change.Link

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An Industrial Policy for Good Jobs

An Industrial Policy for Good Jobs. Dani Rodrik, May 8, 2019, “So-called productive dualism is driving many contemporary ills in developed and developing countries alike: rising inequality and exclusion, loss of trust in governing elites, and growing electoral support for authoritarian populists. But much of the policy discussion today focuses on solutions that miss the true source of the problem.Link

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Peaceful Coexistence 2.0

Peaceful Coexistence 2.0. Dani Rodrik, April 10, 2019, Opinion, “Today’s Sino-American impasse is rooted in “hyper-globalism,” under which countries must open their economies to foreign companies, regardless of the consequences for their growth strategies or social models. But a global trade regime that cannot accommodate the world’s largest trading economy is a regime in urgent need of repair.Link

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The Case for a Bold Economics

The Case for a Bold Economics. Dani Rodrik, March 11, 2019, Opinion, “Although economists are well positioned to imagine new institutional arrangements, their habit of thinking at the margin and sticking close to the evidence at hand encourages an aversion to radical change. But, when presented with new challenges, economists must envision new solutions – as a new group is determined to do.Link

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The Good Jobs Challenge

The Good Jobs Challenge. Dani Rodrik, February 7, 2019, Opinion, “Every economy in the world today is divided between an advanced segment, typically globally integrated, employing a minority of the labor force, and a low-productivity segment that absorbs the bulk of the workforce, often at low wages and under poor conditions. How should policymakers address this dualism?Link

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Economics for Inclusive Prosperity

Economics for Inclusive Prosperity: An Introduction. Dani Rodrik, January 2019, Paper, “We live in an age of astonishing inequality. Income and wealth disparities between the rich and the poor in the United States have risen to heights not seen since the gilded age in the early part of the 20th century, and are among the highest in the developed world. Median wages for American workers remain at 1970s levels. Fewer and fewer among newer generations can expect to do better than their parents. Organizational and technological changes and globalization have fueled great wealth accumulation among those able to take advantage of them, but have left large segments of the population behind. U.S. life expectancy has declined for the third year in a row in 2017, and the allocation of healthcare looks both inefficient and unfair. Advances in automation and digitization threaten even greater labor market disruptions in the years ahead. Climate change fueled disasters increasingly disrupt everyday life. Greater prosperity and inclusion both seem attainable, yet the joint target recedes ever further.Link

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Trump’s Trade Game

Trump’s Trade Game. Dani Rodrik, January 16, 2019, Opinion, “In 2018, US President Donald Trump finally followed through on his “America first” trade strategy. Yet it is already clear that his policies will have little impact on trade growth, and even less effect on China’s behavior.Link

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Labor Market Shocks and the Demand for Trade Protection: Evidence from Online Surveys

Labor Market Shocks and the Demand for Trade Protection: Evidence from Online Surveys. Rafael Di Tella, Dani Rodrik, January 16, 2019, Paper, “We study preferences for government action in response to layoffs resulting from different types of labor-market shocks. We consider the following shocks: technological change, a demand shift, bad management, and three kinds of international outsourcing. Respondents are given a choice among no government action, compensatory transfers, and trade protection. In response to these shocks, support for government intervention generally rises sharply and is heavily biased towards trade protection. Demand for import protection increases significantly in all cases, except for the “bad management” shock. Trade shocks generate more demand for protectionism, and among trade shocks, outsourcing to a developing country elicits greater demand for protectionism than outsourcing to a developed country. The “bad management” shock is the only scenario that induces a desired increase in compensatory transfers; it is also the only case without a significant increase in desired trade protection. Effects appear to be heterogeneous across subgroups with different political preferences and education. In particular, Trump supporters are more protectionist than Clinton supporters. But preferences seem malleable and easy to manipulate: Clinton supporters primed with trade shocks are as protectionist as baseline Trump voters.Link

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