Found 82 article(s) for author 'Dani Rodrik'

Will New Technologies Help or Harm Developing Countries?

Will New Technologies Help or Harm Developing Countries? Dani Rodrik, October 8, 2018, Opinion, “Trade and technology present an opportunity when they are able to leverage existing capabilities, and thereby provide a more direct and reliable path to development. When they demand complementary and costly investments, they are no longer a shortcut around traditional manufacturing-led development.Link

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New Technologies, Global Value Chains, and the Developing Economies

New Technologies, Global Value Chains, and the Developing Economies. Dani Rodrik, 2018, Paper, “The Pathways for Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development is proud to work with a talented and diverse group of commissioners who are global leaders from government, the private sector and academia. Hosted and managed by…Link

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Second thoughts on economics rules

Second thoughts on economics rules. Dani Rodrik, 2018, Paper, “When I was a graduate student at Princeton I used to hang out with a group of fellow students who were economic theorists. They were good at both thinking hard and drinking hard! After a couple of beers, I would start bugging them about the models we were being taught. Why do we focus so much on the perfectly rational individual even though real people do not seem to behave quite that way? (This was before the behavioral revolution obviously.) Shouldn’t we be paying a wee bit more attention to disequilibrium, in addition to equilibrium? Why do our models exclude social
and institutional features without which markets could not work? Why do we emphasize math so much and disregard things that cannot be easily quantified?Link

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The WTO has become dysfunctional

The WTO has become dysfunctional. Dani Rodrik, August 5, 2018, Opinion, “How will the world trade regime handle a large, increasingly powerful country such as China that apparently plays globalisation by different rules? This is the question that keeps US and European policymakers awake at night. The fever runs highest in the US, where the Trump administration has blamed China for engaging in economic aggression and has declared trade war in response. The US president’s methods may be frowned upon, but the view that omething has to be done about China’s trade and industrial practices is widespread among mainstream policy elites.Link

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How To Avoid a Trade War

How To Avoid a Trade War. Dani Rodrik, July 10, 2018, Opinion, “Economists typically argue against focusing excessively on the losers from freer trade, and they decry the tendency to overlook the beneficiaries on the export side. They should not be prone to the same fallacy now, by ignoring that US protectionism surely will generate some beneficiaries as well in other countries.Link

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How Democratic Is the Euro?

How Democratic Is the Euro? Dani Rodrik, June 11, 2018, Opinion, “If the European Union is to remain viable and democratic at the same time, policymakers will have to pay closer attention to the demanding requirements of delegating decisions to unelected bodies. They should promote such a delegation of sovereignty only when it truly enhances the long-term performance of their democracies.Link

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The Double Standard of America’s China Trade Policy

The Double Standard of America’s China Trade Policy. Dani Rodrik, May 10, 2018, Opinion, “Many liberal commentators in the US think that Donald Trump is right to confront China over its trade tactics, and object only to his methods. Yet Trump’s trade agenda is driven by a narrow mercantilism that privileges the interests of US corporations above those of all other.Link

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The Political Economy of Ideas: On Ideas Versus Interests in Policymaking

The Political Economy of Ideas: On Ideas Versus Interests in Policymaking. Dani Rodrik, March 2018, Paper, “We develop a conceptual framework to highlight the role of ideas as a catalyst for policy and institutional change. We make an explicit distinction between ideas and vested interests and show how they feed into each other. In doing so the paper integrates the Keynes-Hayek perspective on the importance of ideas with the currently more fashionable Stigler-Becker (interests only) approach to political economy. We distinguish between two kinds of ideational politics – the battle among different worldviews on the efficacy of policy (worldview politics) versus the politics of victimhood, pride and identity (identity politics).Link

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