Found 110 article(s) for author 'China'

Trump’s Mercantilist Mess

Trump’s Mercantilist Mess. Robert Barro, September 5, 2019, Opinion, “When US President Donald Trump boasted that trade wars are “easy to win” in March 2018, it was convenient to dismiss the remark as a rhetorical flourish. Yet it is now clear that Trump meant it, because he genuinely believes the bizarre and anachronistic macroeconomic theories underlying his approach.Link

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Jeffrey Frankel Says More…

Jeffrey Frankel Says More... Jeffrey Frankel, September 2019, Opinion, “Welcome to Say More, a weekly newsletter that brings Project Syndicate’s renowned contributors closer to readers. Each issue invites a selected contributor to expand on topics covered in their commentaries, address new ones, and share recommendations, offering readers exclusive insights into the ideas, interests, and personalities of the world’s leading thinkers. This week, Project Syndicate catches up with Jeffrey Frankel, Professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.Link

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China’s rise and the growing doubts over trade multilateralism

China’s rise and the growing doubts over trade multilateralism. Mark Wu, 2019, Book Chapter, “China’s impressive economic and technological rise in the early 21st century is unprecedented in modern times. For one, it marks the first time in the postwar era that the world’s leading trade power has embraced an economic and political model different than the traditional liberal democratic, market-oriented model associated with industrialised nations. While the world trading system has never mandated that countries within the regime conform to any economic model per se, the postwar global trade regime has always been led by countries within the Western security alliance, with the US at its fore. China, however, has sought to chart out its own path.Link

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Trump Is Losing the Trade War With China

Trump Is Losing the Trade War With China. Jason Furman, August 19, 2019, Opinion, “President Trump’s China strategy is failing. His tougher approach has yielded no meaningful Chinese concessions but is increasingly damaging the U.S. economy. Today China is more integrated with the rest of the world while the U.S. is more isolated. To combat China’s unfair, statist economic practices effectively, the U.S. must change its approach, enlisting allies and international institutions to advance a more focused set of demands.Link

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The currency manipulation game is afoot – but that’s better than a trade war

The currency manipulation game is afoot – but that’s better than a trade war. Jeffrey Frankel, August 13, 2019, Opinion, “The trade war between the United States and China is heating up again, with U.S. President Donald Trump abruptly announcing plans to impose a 10-per-cent tariff on the US$300-billion worth of imports from China that he had so far left untouched. The Chinese authorities then allowed their currency, the renminbi, to fall below the symbolic threshold of seven yuan for every U.S. dollar. The Trump administration promptly responded by naming China a “currency manipulator” – the first time the U.S. had done that to any country in 25 years. Pundits declared a currency war, and investors immediately sent global stock markets lower.Link

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Varieties of Outward Chinese Capital: Domestic Politics Status and Globalization of Chinese Firms

Varieties of Outward Chinese Capital: Domestic Politics Status and Globalization of Chinese Firms. Meg Rithmire, , Paper, “A great deal of scholarly and popular attention has been devoted the “specter of global China” (Lee 2017). Contemporary China has been interacting with and shaping processes of globalization since it opened its door in 1978, but the more recent spate of attention has focused specifically on Chinese outward investment, which has soared since the early 2000s and especially since the global financial crisis in 2008. Scholars and journalists have sought to understand the extent to which China is “buying the world,” what it means for both the developing world (presumed to be the target) and developed world (presumed to be the competition), and what patterns of investment can illuminate about whether China is “playing our game” (harmonizing with western political and economic institutions) or pursuing a revised world order (Nolan 2013; Steinfeld 2010; Toh 2017).Link

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China’s Overseas Lending

China’s Overseas Lending. Carmen Reinhart, July 2017, Paper, “Compared with China’s dominance in world trade, its expanding role in global finance is poorly documented and understood. Over the past decades, China has exported record amounts of capital to the rest of the world. Many of these financial flows are not reported to the IMF, the BIS or the World Bank. “Hidden debts” to China are especially significant for about three dozen developing countries, and distort the risk assessment in both policy surveillance and the market pricing of sovereign debt. We establish the size, destination, and characteristics of China’s overseas lending. We identify three key distinguishing features. First, almost all of China’s lending and investment abroad is official. As a result, the standard “push” and “pull” drivers of private cross-border flows do not play the same role in this case. Second, the documentation of China’s capital exports is (at best) opaque. China does not report on its official lending and there is no comprehensive standardized data on Chinese overseas debt stocks and flows. Third, the type of flows is tailored by recipient. Advanced and higher middle-income countries tend to receive portfolio debt flows, via sovereign bond purchases of the People’s Bank of China. Lower income developing economies mostly receive direct loans from China’s state-owned banks, often at market rates and backed by collateral such as oil. Our new dataset covers a total of 1,974 Chinese loans and 2,947 Chinese grants to 152 countries from 1949 to 2017. We find that about one half of China’s overseas loans to the developing world are “hidden”.Link

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Jeffrey Frankel on Taxes, Trade, Tariffs, and the Possibility of the Next Recession

Jeffrey Frankel on Taxes, Trade, Tariffs, and the Possibility of the Next Recession June 2019. GrowthPolicy’s Devjani Roy interviewed Jeffrey Frankel, James W. Harpel Professor of Capital Formation and Growth at Harvard Kennedy School, on the current tax policy, international trade, tariffs, and the possibility of the next recession. | Click here for more interviews […]

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