Found 57 article(s) for author 'Cass Sunstein'

Which Europeans Like Nudges? Approval and Controversy in Four European Countries

Which Europeans Like Nudges? Approval and Controversy in Four European Countries. Cass Sunstein, January 29, 2018, Paper, “Policy makers show an increasing interest in “nudges”—behaviorally motivated interventions that steer people in certain directions but maintain freedom of consumer choice. Despite this interest, little evidence has surfaced about which population groups support nudges and nudging. We report the results of nationally representative surveys in Denmark, Hungary, Italy, and the United Kingdom. Individual, household, and geographic characteristics served as predictors of nudge approval, and the count of significant predictors as measures of controversy.Link

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Should Governments Invest More in Nudging?

Should Governments Invest More in Nudging? John Beshears, Cass Sunstein, August 2017, Paper, “Governments are increasingly adopting behavioral science techniques for changing individual behavior in pursuit of policy objectives. The types of “nudge” interventions that governments are now adopting alter people’s decisions without coercion or significant changes to economic incentives. We calculated ratios of impact to cost for nudge interventions and for traditional policy tools, such as tax incentives and other financial inducements, and we found that nudge interventions often compare favorably with traditional interventions. We conclude that nudging is a valuable approach that should be used more often in conjunction with traditional policies, but more calculations are needed to determine the relative effectiveness of nudging.Link

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Deregulating Is Not So Easy

Deregulating Is Not So Easy. Cass Sunstein, July 25, 2017, Opinion, “In what sounded like a major announcement, the Trump administration last week highlighted numbers showing it was making big strides in controlling regulations. It is true that the pace of rulemaking has slowed dramatically. Thus far, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs has approved just 41 regulations, meaning that we might see fewer than 100 in all of 2017. That would be less than one-fifth of the average under the most recent Republican president, George W. Bush.” Link

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Should Governments Invest More in Nudging?

Should Governments Invest More in Nudging? Cass Sunstein, June 5, 2017, Paper, “Governments are increasingly adopting behavioral science techniques for changing individual behavior in pursuit of policy objectives. The types of “nudge” interventions that governments are now adopting alter people’s decisions without coercion or significant changes to economic incentives. We calculated ratios of impact to cost for nudge interventions and for traditional policy tools, such as tax incentives and other financial inducements, and we found that nudge interventions often compare favorably with traditional interventions. We conclude that nudging is a valuable approach that should be used more often in conjunction with traditional policies, but more calculations are needed to determine the relative effectiveness of nudging.Link

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Human Agency and Behavioral Economics Nudging Fast and Slow

Human Agency and Behavioral Economics: Nudging Fast and Slow. Cass Sunstein, 2017, Book, “This groundbreaking series is designed to make available in book form unique behavioral economic contributions. It provides a publishing opportunity for behavioral economist authors who have a novel perspective and have developed a special ability to integrate economics with other disciplines. It will allow these authors to fully develop
their ideas. In general, it is not a place for narrow technical contributions. Theoretical/conceptual, empirical, and policy contributions are all
welcome.Link

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Trump’s Safe and Sane ‘Regulatory Reform’ Idea

Trump’s Safe and Sane ‘Regulatory Reform’ Idea. Cass Sunstein, March 3, 2017, Opinion, “In one of his few statements since joining government, presidential adviser Stephen Bannon announced that one of the Trump administration’s principal goals was “the deconstruction of the administrative state.” Given the critical role of federal agencies in protecting public health and safety, that’s pretty provocative. But President Donald Trump’s latest action suggests that reform is the aim, rather than deconstruction — and the reform might even turn out to be reasonable.Link

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Donald Trump Should Know: This Is What Climate Change Costs Us

Donald Trump Should Know: This Is What Climate Change Costs Us. Cass Sunstein, December 15, 2016, Opinion, “Last week, Donald J. Trump’s transition team sent a startling questionnaire to the Department of Energy. Among other things, the questionnaire asked for the names of all employees and contractors who attended meetings of the Interagency Working Group on the Social Cost of Carbon, as well as all emails associated with those meetings, and the department’s “opinion” on the underlying issues — a request it essentially refused.Link

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Nudges That Fail

Nudges That Fail. Cass Sunstein, September 2016, Paper, “Why are some nudges ineffective, or at least less effective than choice architects hope and expect? Focusing primarily on default rules, this essay emphasizes two reasons. The first involves strong antecedent preferences on the part of choosers. The second involves successful “counternudges,” which persuade people to choose in a way that confounds the efforts of choice architects. Nudges might also be ineffective, and less effective than expected, for five other reasons.Link

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